COVID-19 THEATER SERIES: Reaching for the Stars - An Interview with Edgemar's Michelle Danner


To understand the philosophy of filmmaker, director, and acting coach Michelle Danner, it is only necessary to hear the truth of her own words:

"The craft of acting is as alluring as it is mysterious, and it takes a being of great passion, insight, and determination in order to succeed. But to teach acting – to inspire creative souls to successfully harvest those tools – requires an even great commitment to bring out the best in each and every actor one encounters…the important thing is to keep growing as an artist, to keep raising the bar for yourself.”

Michelle has taught acting for the last 29 years and has worked with many A-List actors privately and on set, including Chris Rock, Gerard Butler, Seth MacFarlane, Penelope Cruz, James Franco, and Zooey Deschanel. In 2020, Michelle anticipates the release of the supernatural thriller Bad Impulse, while prepping her next feature, The Runner starring Cameron Douglas. That’s in addition to running her weekly acting class, keeping watch over the conservatory program at the Los Angeles Acting School (which she co-founded), directing a play starring Anne Archer at the Edgemar Center for the Arts, or cheering on her two high-school aged sons as they pursue their own passions. Michelle took time out of her workaholic’s schedule to interview in April 2020.


Jerry Lacy and Gina Manziello in "Surviving Mama" - Photo by Eric Wade

When did the Edgemar Center for the Arts first begin its long career? What led to its creation? What's your mission? Were you involved from the beginning?

Michelle Danner:  We built the theaters and the art gallery at the Edgemar Center for the Arts in the year 2000. We’re actually celebrating our twentieth anniversary! When I discovered the space, the Santa Monica Museum of Art was there; and it was a big open space. We were able to raise funds to build these beautiful theaters. Ever since then, we have had many many theater productions, musical theater shows, children’s shows, independent film festivals, outreach programs, and exhibits. We have hosted hundreds of events. I was the person who got everyone to believe that this could be a thriving cultural center. I was involved from the beginning, including the construction. I always joke that I know more about drywall, plumbing, and electricity than I would have ever wanted to know. I have been the artistic director for the Edgemar Center for the Arts from its inception. I had a vision for what it could be, and I got a group of similar minded folks to come on board and be part of it.

Rob Estes and Michelle Danner in "One White Crow" - Photo by Sandis Babauskis

When did you close the theater due to COVID-19? Were you in the middle of a run?

MD: We were. Thankfully, we had just finished our film festival, Cinema at the Edge, that takes place every year. We had a great response to our screenings, culminating at the end with our award ceremony. Shortly after that, we had to shut down. I was in the middle of rehearsing a very wonderful show, A Ticket to the Circus, with Anne Archer. It was written by Bonnie Culver about Norris Church Mailer, the wife of Norman Mailer; and we had to cancel our rehearsals abruptly and reschedule them from day to day. When it became clear that we had to cancel everything all together, we shut down completely. Because of the unknown of this, it remains a mystery when we will be able to reopen. We had two other shows that were set to open which we also had to cancel and plan to reschedule.

Over the past weeks, how has COVID-19 impacted your theater?

MD: It’s impacted it tremendously in the way that everybody has stayed home, but we have touched base online and on the phone. People are scared, sometimes isolated, and not close to their families. A lot of our employees were dependent on their paycheck. We have done our best, but it’s not easy.

Christine Dunford in "Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike" - Photo by Teferi Seifu

Are you dong anything right now to keep your live theater going? Streaming? Having virtual meetings? Planning for your next show when you reopen? Auditioning? Fundraising?

MD: We are streaming chats and having virtual meetings with our acting students, but it’s not the easiest. Again, all of this because there is an unknown factor to it. We are, however, starting a GoFundMe page to ask people to help keep the theater open. When it’s time - and if anybody would like to help - we are a 501(c)(3). No donation is too small, and they are all tax deductible. Anyone can reach me directly through our website. I would be happy to talk to anyone about different possibilities.

What do you think will be the impact of COVID-19 on live theater in general in Los Angeles? Do you foresee any permanent changes?

MD: If we read the history of all pandemics, they all come to an end. So I am hoping that there will be a renewed desire to want to share live theater with other people. There is nothing like a communal experience together. Maybe this will help us appreciate the value of that even more.

What are some of your future plans?

MD: Our future plans are to remount what we had planned for the spring and the summer and develop some new plays that will thematically address what we have all been going through. We will also be preparing for “Cinema at the Edge 2021.” I believe that great art can come out of scary times. This is a moment in our lives that can give birth to great content. From my point of view, the theater can never die. When we are back in action, we all need to support it. Right now, I miss theater and that magical shared experience with others.


This article first appeared in LA Splash Worldwide.



COVID-19 THEATER SERIES: Youth and Theater - An Interview with Young Stars Theatre's Jack Bennett


The multi-talented Jack J. Bennett has tried his hand at nearly every aspect of show business, including stand-up comedy, live theater, and directing. Jack is also the veteran of over 100 television commercials, as well as film and television appearances in shows like Desperate Housewives, House, and The Bold and the Beautiful. In 2000, he and his wife Gloria co-founded Young Stars Theatre, specializing in live theater for youth, where he is the artistic director. Jack took time from his schedule to interview in April 2020. 


Corwin Daley, Rowan Farley, Augie Matsuura, and Victoria Field in "Disney's Beauty and the Beast Jr. - Photo by Jack J. Bennett

When did your theater first begin? What led to its creation? What is your mission? Were you involved from the beginning?

Jack J. Bennett:  I met my wife Gloria doing Equity theater in 1996 at the Alhambra Dinner Theatre in Jacksonville, Florida. We became friends, and then I went to work for her as the office manager of her music studio. In 1997, we got hired to run a youth summer drama camp. We noticed that there were some issues working with a few of the staff, but we learned something too. We took away the idea that we could do this ourselves. We did a yearly summer drama camp for several years and started noticing how sad the kids would be at the end. They became tearful because it might not be until the next summer that they got another chance to do theater. That’s how we came up with the idea of year-round youth community theater for kids 18 and under. The Young Stars Theatre (YST) was born in 2000.  Gloria produces and directs the music, and I direct and design/build sets and handle marketing materials. Up until the summer of 2005, we continued doing summer camps in Jacksonville – even after we had moved to the LA area.

We literally knocked down a wall in Gloria's music studio to create a small theatre space with a tiny stage that was 13.5' wide x 8' deep that could seat about 40. We started doing regular productions there; for a couple of years, we did around six a year. The building in Florida was sold, and the new landlords asked for debilitating rent increases. We were forced to shut the Florida program in 2002 (except for the summer camps). After moving to the LA area in 2005, we reopened YST. Starting in 2016, we moved into our permanent space at the Fremont Centre Theatre in South Pasadena. Although we still mostly do eight youth productions a year, we do at least one show a year with adult performers. We almost always have a youth cast for those productions as well.

Kurt Koehler, Tara Cox, Aidan Martin, and Eadan Franklynn in "Bye Bye Birdie" - Photo by Jack J. Bennett

When did you close the theater due to COVID-19? Were you in the middle of a run?

JJB: We made the decision on March 11 and closed on March 12, right after hearing that the NBA was shutting down. We were right in the middle of our run of Seussical Jr. We had already performed for two weekends and had two more weekends (eight shows) to go. Audiences were already very low, as the coronavirus news was already making people wary.  A big moment was when one of our actors commented, "I'm not worried about the virus, but I don't want to catch it and take it home to my grandma." That was a real wake-up call.

Over the past weeks, how has COVID-19 impacted your theater?

JJB: As with any small theater, our margin is razor thin. Losing two weeks, which was really four weeks since the first two weekends were not well attended, meant that the loss of ticket sales was financially crushing. Largely thanks to some donations and purchases of gift certificates, we were able to pay our lease for April.

Are you doing anything right now to keep your live theater going? Streaming? Having virtual meetings? Planning for your next show when you reopen? Auditions? Fundraising? 

JJB: We were in the middle of rehearsals for our next show, The Wizard of Oz.  My wife has been using ZOOM for years, both for virtual lessons (she is a voice teacher) and for meetings for a side business. Because of that, we translated almost immediately to ZOOM rehearsals. Virtual rehearsals have actually gone quite well. Of course, there are challenges trying to communicate movement and spatial relationship in a virtual environment. Besides, having everyone sing a group song is impossible in the traditional sense. But I think we have come up with some viable workarounds for the time being. We are also continuing our improv classes online for our youth membership company.

Jack J. Bennett and Gloria Bennett in "Sweeney Todd" - Photo by Marie Lafranque

What do you think will be the impact of COVID-19 on live theater in general in Los Angeles? Do you foresee any permanent changes?

JJB: I truly hope we can get back to business more or less as usual; but right now, it's impossible to see. Even when theaters reopen, some questions remain. Will audiences be okay with coming back? Will they have income to spend on theater? I'm actually more concerned about the economic effects going forward than anything else. We were somewhat fortunate to have recently come off a very successful run, so we had a tiny buffer - but not everyone does. I hope I'm wrong, but I'm afraid there are going to be a lot of theaters that close permanently because of this. That really makes me sad.

Brayden Nguyen, Ella Dan, and Carolyn Mottern in "Elf Jr." - Photo by Terre Marriott

What do you need right now to keep going forward? What would you like from the theater public?

JJB: It's pretty simple: money. Bills are not susceptible to the virus. We've applied for different programs and loans, but we have no idea whether we'll see a dollar of that. If you have a favorite theater where you love to go, you need to support them financially right now. Donate, buy gift cards, help with fundraisers, anything you can do that helps them keep paying their bills when they have almost no income right now. If you don't, they might not be around later.

What are some of your future plans?

JJB: We are still planning to complete the run of Seussical Jr, put The Wizard of Oz on stage right after that, and then start our summer camps. Fingers crossed.


This article first appeared in LA Splash Worldwide.



COVID-19 THEATER SERIES: Ronnie Marmo on the Move - A Coast-to-Coast Artist


Originally from the East Coast, actor / producer / director / writer / chief bottle washer Ronnie Marmo has managed to call both the East and West coast home during his life-long career. Perhaps best known for his stellar performance in I'm Not a Comedian... I'm Lenny Bruce, which he also penned – directed, by the way, by the talented Joe Mantegna - or his three year / 150 episode run on General Hospital just a few years ago, Ronnie traveled from Los Angeles to New York to Chicago to entertain audiences far and wide. With critically acclaimed performances in dozens of plays, including Bill W. and Dr. Bob and Tony ‘N Tina’s Wedding, Ronnie co-founded Theatre 68 Los Angeles 19 years ago. The New York Chapter opened nine years ago now, making Theatre 68 a bi-coastal home for many artists. Despite his perpetual-motion-machine style, Ronnie took time out to interview during the COVID-19 “holiday” from live theater.


Ronnie Marmo as Lenny Bruce - Photo by Doren Sorell

How is the COVID-19 ban on live theater affecting you and Theatre 68?

Ronnie Marmo:  We tried to keep the Lenny Bruce show open in Chicago as long as we could. We got as far as Sunday, March 15 before we ultimately postponed the show and went dark for the time being. For our last four performances, we deliberately sold only a quarter of the 180 seats in the theater to allow for social distancing; and we sanitized everything that people might touch. In 25 years, I’ve never missed a performance. Now we don’t have a choice, but this virus is scary and it’s important to respect the people who know more than us about COVID-19 safety.

The LA and NY Chapters of Theatre 68 are currently dark for productions; however, the community is sticking together with our Monday Night Actors Gym on both coasts. It's a hard time right now because many of us don’t know much about this virus. I’m concerned for theaters both small and large around the world because, generally speaking, theater is not a very lucrative business; and many of us survive month to month. After all, we don’t get into the theater business to get rich. We do it because we can’t help ourselves; we love it. It’s a sickness of sorts (laughing). My hope is that people will continue to support the arts. For example, if you currently have tickets for a show or event, it would be wonderful if people can move those tickets to a performance down the road as opposed to asking for a refund - but ONLY if they could afford to do so.

Ronnie Marmo as Lenny Bruce - Photo by Doren Sorell 2

Tell us about your plans for the future. Will you continue with I'm Not a Comedian...I'm Lenny Bruce? Do you have any new shows planned?

RM:  First and foremost, we plan on bringing the Lenny Bruce show back to Chicago just as soon as it is safe to do so. Also, we plan on having a few pop-up performances here in Los Angeles. We have just signed with Columbia Artists Theatrical, and they are working on a national tour. We have already had an offer for early 2021 in Tampa, Florida; and many other venues have inquired. But I assume that, with the virus, things may be delayed a bit. We will see.

Let me tell you a bit more about Theatre 68 and our productions. We have great leadership on both Coasts, and we’ve been in constant meetings making plans and finding ways to keep the company inspired during this very tough time.

I plan to keep moving forward in hopes that all will be well soon enough / Combined on both coasts, we have 90 actors who take part in our NOW virtual Monday Night Actor’s Gym. I’m constantly trying to help keep everyone engaged. We’re working really hard with lots of writing assignments, monologue jams, anything we can do virtually to continue to grow as artists. We’re constantly producing on both coasts. Right now, we’re working on Stupid Fucking Bird by Aaron Posner. It’s a great play, a really cool play. It’s sort of a contemporary version of Anton Chekhov’s, Seagull. We plan to open in June in Los Angeles. We’re having virtual auditions next week, and we plan to move forward as if it will happen, even if maybe we have to postpone it. In NY, we are in the middle of developing seven original one-act plays written by NY company members. We’re going into virtual auditions for that as well in the coming weeks.

Monday night at Theatre 68's virtual gym - Photo by Ronnie Marmo

Any final thoughts on live theater's survival during a pandemic?

RM:  Our survival depends on how kind the landlords are to theater owners. I’m going to work my pants off to keep this thing going for all involved. I feel that enthusiasm is the key to life, and that certainly has been the case for me. People have asked me how I’ve found success in different areas of show business, and I simply tell them - I do my best to finish what I start.


This article first appeared in LA Splash Worldwide.



COVID-19 THEATER SERIES: The Show Must Go On - An Interview with Echo Theatre Company's Chris Fields


A Los Angeles-based director, teacher, and actor, Chris Fields is currently the artistic director of the award-winning Echo Theater Company, a theater which he co-founded in 1997. Since its beginnings, the Echo Theater Company has presented multiple award-winning productions. Chris has worked in film and television, including stints in Fight Club, Apollo 13, Jurassic Park, NYPD Blue, and ER. From 1996 to 2000, he was founder and artistic director of the Ojai Playwrights Conference. As a director, he won the LADCC for Firemen and the Stage Raw award for Gloria. In 2017, the Company founded the National Young Playwrights in Residence in order to encourage and mentor young writers across the country. Describing Echo Theater Company’s approach to play selection, KCRW noted:

“The Echo Theater Company is on a fierce journey…they’re choosing plays that are consistently challenging, and all have a deep conscious…a rare commodity…the body of work that Echo is building is substantial…if you wanted to pick one small theater to add to your cultural roster – Echo is a consistent favorite.”

Chris took time from his busy schedule to interview in March 2020.


Steven Stroble, Alana Dietze, and Devere Rogers in "Gloria" - Photo by Darrett Sanders

Tell us something about the founding of the echo theatre company. What was the impetus for it to begin? What kind of programs does Echo offer? 

Chris Fields:  A half dozen of us founded Echo in 1996. The group of us went to the Eugene O’Neil National Playwrights Conference every year in the summer. One of the things we learned in the workshops was that the only way to develop a play is by working with the writer. Process, not product, is the key. We were all actors and transplants to LA, so we thought we would start a company that emphasized having a relationship with the writer.

One outgrowth of that was that award-winner Bekah Brunstetter wrote The Cake in our Lab. We told her to take her time with the play. We were able to do that because we have a relationship with her. Another writer we have a relationship with is Kate Robin, a writer for Six Feet Under on TV. She wrote Anon, and we put 22 women on stage in that one. By developing and maintaining a close relationship with writers, we’re able to develop really powerful stories.

Megan Ketch and Jackie Chung in "Cry It Out" - Photo by Darrett Sanders

When did you close the theater due to COVID-19? Were you in the middle of a run? 

CF: We were planning to open Chiara Atik’s Poor Clare on March 14, and we had previews on March 11 and March 12. The play was very well received. Then the Mayor shut down all the theaters, so we never really had an opening night.

Over the past few weeks, how has COVID-19 impacted your theater?

CF: Poor Clare was a world premiere production, and we put all our money into the show. When it didn't open, it was scary. We took a financial hit and immediately launched a fundraising campaign. Our financial model was shaken up quite a bit. Like almost everyone else in theater, it’s been tough going.

Kari Lee Cartwright, Troy Leigh-Anne Johnson, and Martica De Cardenas in "Poor Care" - Photo by Darrett Sanders

Are you doing anything right now to keep our live theater going? Streaming? Having virtual meetings? Planning for your next show when you reopen? Auditioning? Fundraising? What would you like from the Theater public?

CF: We will have on-line meetings of Echo National Young Playwrights in Residence. We pair a novice with a professional artist mentor. We’ve always done that on Skype because the writers are chosen from all over the country. We also have the Echo Young Playwrights, which is LA-based; that too will meet digitally.

We’ve moved everything to digital platforms. That includes our weekly meetings and the Young Playwrights. We’re rehearsing a play right now via Zoom. It’s called Forget Me Not When Far Away by Kira Obolensky. She’s from Minneapolis and wrote the play for the “10,000 Things” Project. She wrote for an inmate population in Minnesota, and her play has 39 women and one male character. Eleven of our Associate Company members are cast, and we even have men playing women. It’s fine by me so long as they don’t “camp” it up; and Kira agreed. I’m not sure when it will open, since everything is up in the air.

Jenny Soo and Teagan Rose in "Dry Land" - Photo by Darrett Sanders

We have a Playwriting Lab headed up by Darcy Fowler, a writer, and Stephanie Ward, a director. We discussed the current situation and decided we can’t just sit around. We’re putting content on our Facebook page. We’ve also already posted a radio play to our Facebook page. We introduced a “Lifetime Pass” in which people pay $500 and have a lifetime pass to everything that Echo does. People are responding well to that. Since we’re a non-profit, it’s tax deductible too. We want the theater public to remain connected and involved.

 

What are some of your future plans?

CF: We want to keep on going. We’re hoping to open Poor Clare in July. We have a season of three plays planned. I hope that everything works out. Right now, I know that this will end at some point; and then we’ll be ready to offer quality productions again. We just keep going with love for our work and our community.


This article first appeared in LA Splash Worldwide.



COVID-19 Theater Series: A 70-Year Theater Family Legacy - Ellen Geer and Theatricum Botanicum


Currently the matriarch of a theater dynasty, Ellen Geer followed in the family footsteps from an early age. Both her parents were actors, with her father Will Geer earning national fame as Grandfather Zeb Walton on TV’s 1960s hit, “The Waltons.” Ellen worked in some of the major repertory theatres around the country and has been active in film and television since 1971. Her career stretches to the present. In 1978, Ellen became the producing artistic director of her father’s dream theater after his death – certainly a huge undertaking for a busy actor, professor, theater director, and writer. She has performed admirably in all these roles, including a parental role. Her sister, Melora Marshall, her brother Thad Geer, and her daughter Willow have continued the family tradition as accomplished actors. Ellen still remains very active in theater as actor, director, playwright, adaptor, and producer. She took time from her busy schedule to interview in April 2020.


Will Geer - Photo courtesy of Theatricum Botanicum

Tell us something about Theatricum Botanicum. When did your theater first begin its long career? Who/how/why/where was it founded?

Ellen Geer:  It was really founded in the 1950s. It was the cruel time of the McCarthy hearings, when people were blackballed and couldn’t work in show business. There were actors, technicians, writers, folksingers, all sorts of out-of-work people essential to theater.  We called our home “Geer Gardens.” We made a living selling plants and became a haven for out-of-work artists. At the time, I was around ten years old – so I was almost born into our family theater. And, given my dad’s career, I was most certainly born into show business.  In the seventies, the family returned; and my father Will Geer founded Theatricum Botanicum. We performed our first show in Topanga Canyon in 1973; it was Shakespeare’s Midsummer’s Night’s Dream – and we have been performing the play ever since. We also started free workshops in 1973. Hollywood actors wanted to do Shakespeare and other classics, so we had lots of support.

Michael McFall and Melora Marshall in "Midsummer Nights Dream" - Photo by Ian Flanders

When my father died in 1978, the family continued performing and kept the theater going. I took over the running of the theater. We became members of Equity, the actors and stage managers union. My mother was still alive, and the whole family, including brother and sisters, etched out the dream of theater and education. We got our first grant in 1978. That enabled us to begin our educational programs for kids and adults. We have an Academy of Classics; and we also run School Days, a field trip of Shakespeare, and classes for youth in the Los Angeles Unified School District. We have always been a professional theater, but we’re also non-profit and are able to accept grants and donations.

Theatricum Botanicum Company in 1973 - Photo courtesy of Theatricum Botanicum

Theatricum Botanicum has an outdoor stage. Have you had to make any special accommodations to perform on a hillside?

EG:  I absolutely love it. In fact, I like it much more than being indoors with wings and curtains. Nature and art are the best of friends. We have a beautiful natural background, so we don’t have to spend huge amounts of money on sets. Our sets are the great outdoors. But performing in nature also dictates some of our choices. Sometimes, the weather may also interfere. I remember once, a long time ago, it started to rain. The audience opened their umbrellas, so we had to keep going. In Merchant of Venice, a dove of peace flew on the oak tree during the court room scene – it sat there and observed the whole thing! Once a large rat fell from a tree in the middle of a love scene. Our star grabbed the stunned animal by the tale, swung it around over his head, and tossed it far away! There are lots of creative ways to deal with almost anything.

Willow Geer and Christine Breihan in "Twelfth Night" - Photo by Ian Flanders

When did you close the theater due to COVID-19? Were you in the middle of a run?

EG:  It was a week before casting. We planned to open School Days at the end of April. Our main repertory season of five plays runs from June to September; and we have programs for the kids in May and October, as well as a camp in the summer. We were all ready to go. Many theaters were in the middle of a run - so hard. We were lucky.

Over the past weeks, how has COVID-19 impacted your theater?

EG:  We had to let go of some of our staff; now some are on unemployment. It’s interesting that unemployment is paying them more than we could as a non-profit. We really miss our artists and educators. At this point, all education is online.

Willow Geer and Ellen Geer in "Chalk Garden" - Photo by Liam Flanders

Are you doing anything right now to keep your live theater going? Are you streaming videos? Do you have virtual meetings? Are you planning for your next show when you reopen? Any auditions coming up or fund raising?

EG:  All education is now digital. Our staff has learned how to use different kinds of digital platforms like Zoom. Elizabeth Tobias, our incredible educational director, has set a full schedule of monologue, poetry, movement, and technical approaches to the classics for adults. We’re also going to have a program on rhetoric and language taught by Milan Dragicevich, who’s an Amhurst professor specializing in Shakespeare. He was one of our original company members. We have teen online classes where students write their own monologues, and we even have a sword fighting class!  We want to have them move - even when quarantined! We’re working with the union trying to find a way to do story telling. We also plan to put on concerts. I’m wondering if someday they may unionize people performing in the digital world. Artists need to be paid!

Melora Marshall and Ellen Geer in "The Tempest" - Photo by Ian Flanders

What do you think will be the impact of COVID-19 on live theater in general in Los Angeles? Do you foresee any permanent changes?

EG:  Until we get a clear understanding about what COVID-19 is, we can’t really make any predictions. We have a huge population in Southern California, and Theatricum won’t open until it’s safe. But I sincerely believe that theater will always come back - maybe in a different form - but theater will still return. Some theaters may die, but new things will come out of it. If a group can’t pay their rent, they may go under for a while. But actors will always start up a new theater, and theater will take on a new form. For sure, the theater we see after the pandemic will be different because actors, crew, and audiences have gone through a life-changing experience. Theatre people will help define it.

Theatricum Botanicum is planning on going green. We’re revitalizing our creek and making other earth-friendly changes. We want people to see what can be done to alleviate climate change. We want to help people grow in their respect for nature.

Mark Bramhall, Willow Geer, and Ellen Geer in "Other Desert Cities" - Photo by Miriam Geer

What do you need right now to keep going forward? What would you like from the theater public?

EG:  Return to theater-going! Support young people’s desire to learn about great playwrights, and help them feel comfortable presenting before their peers. Theater helps create the next good society. Theatricum will survive and keep doing what we love. Artists keep going because you know deep in your soul that you have to. Arts have taken a back seat because this plague is so big. But we’re all creating new exciting stories, and the rugged time will change. Stay positive and carry on!

What are some of your future plans?

EG: To open or not to open is up to the scientists and medical world. We will continue our academic and educational work - with social distancing. Actually, social distancing is easier for us because we’re in nature. Where we go in the future will also depend on budgeting and funding and when audiences feel safe again to gather. But we plan to go forward because we have a strong company who have a passion for theater and education. We know that audiences will always have a need to get together and share theater. “O Time, must untangle this, not I: It is too hard a knot for me t’untie!” (Twelfth Night by Shakespeare).


This article first appeared in LA Splash Worldwide.



"MEET THE PUBLICISTS" PANEL PODCAST

Better Lemons and Theatre West hosted “Meet the Publicists” featuring several of LA's premier publicists for a panel discussion of theatre publicity, marketing, and promotion.

The following publicists were on the panel:

Tim Choy (Davidson & Choy Publicity)
DAVIDSON & CHOY PUBLICITY (Press Representatives) resume includes the original Evita through The Book of Mormon and stints with American Ballet Theatre and Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater. Clients include Actor's Gang, Broad Stage, El Capitan Theatre, Ford Theatres, Hollywood Bowl, Lythgoe Pantos, Pasadena Playhouse, Segerstrom Center, Shakespeare Center LA, The Soraya, and Walt Disney Imagineering.

Lucy Pollak (Lucy Pollak Public Relations)
Lucy Pollak has been providing publicity services to the Los Angeles arts community for the past 27 years for companies including 24th STreet Theatre, Antaeus Theatre Company, The Echo Theater Company, Fountain Theatre, International City Theatre, L.A. Theatre Works, Latino Theater Company at the LATC, Los Angeles County Arts Commission, Odyssey Theatre Ensemble, Padua Playwrights, Theatre Planners, Will Geer's Theatricum Botanicum; numerous independent theater and dance productions; and large events and festivals such as the annual L.A. County Holiday Celebration at The Music Center.

From 1981 to 1990, she was production manager/staff producer at the Odyssey Theatre, where she co-produced over 100 productions with artistic director Ron Sossi.

She is the recipient of a Los Angeles Drama Critic's Circle Award (Master Class), an LA Weekly Award (Mary Barnes), four Drama-Logue Awards (Mary Barnes, Idioglossia, Accidental Death of An Anarchist, It's A Girl!), and a Women in Theatre Recognition Award. She has served on the boards of directors of the Los Angeles Theatre Alliance (now L.A. Stage Alliance), Women in Theatre and P.A.T.H. (Performing Arts Theatre for the Handicapped).

Philip Sokoloff
PHILIP SOKOLOFF has been a publicist for 24 years. He represents over 100 live attractions and several dozen feature films annually. His long-term clients include Theatre 40, Edgemar Center for the Arts, Sierra Madre Playhouse, Robey Theatre Company, Arena Cinelounge, Dean Productions and more.He is a member of the Public Relations Society of America. He has also produced for stage and television and has been an actor for 49 years.

Lynn Tejada (Green Galactic)
For 25 years, Green Galactic Founder Lynn Tejada has been the go-to publicist in Los Angeles for alternative art and culture producers, representing clients on a local, regional, national, and international scale. Since 1994, her promotions and client-base has included music of all sorts, theatre, art, film, dance, and more.

Tejada is also drawn to helping charities and nonprofit clients – she currently sits on the board of Linda Carmella Sibio's Bezerk Productions, Dance Camera West and on the advisory board of Lauren Segal's Give A Beat. She is also on the Honorary Board of Flea's Silverlake Conservatory of Music and sat on the board of humanitarian nonprofit NextAid for many years.


Now Registered on the Better Lemons Calendar – April 1 - 7, 2019

Theatrical shows registered on the Better Lemons calendar!
For more shows visit our Calendar.
For shows with a LemonMeter rating, visit our LemonMeter page.

 

Invisible Tango

“Magic sensation Helder Guimarães returns to the Geffen with the world premiere of his one-man show, Invisible Tango. Directed by legendary film producer and director Frank Marshall (Jurassic World, Indiana Jones, Goonies, Back to the Future), Invisible Tango explores the nature of secrets and how far we are willing to go to discover them. In the midst of the information age and our culture of over-sharing, Guimarães challenges our interaction with the unknown and explores how we can embrace the magic of wonder and mystery. Guimarães last amazed and charmed Geffen audiences in the smash hit Nothing to Hide, the two-man magic show that extended four times before transferring to New York. ”

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SINGIN' IN THE RAIN

“The Tap-Happiest Show Ever! GOOD MORNING TO YOU! LA MIRADA THEATRE FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS & McCOY RIGBY ENTERTAINMENT (celebrating its 25th Silver Anniversary at the theatre) are thrilled to present SINGIN' IN THE RAIN, based on the greatest movie musical of all time with screenplay by Betty Comden & Adolph Green and songs by Nacio Herb Brown and Arthur Freed. The fresh new production will be directed & choreographed by Spencer Liff (Emmy nominee for TV's “So You Think You Can Dance” and Broadway's Head Over Heels, Hedwig and the Angry Inch and Falsettos), associate director is Cynthia Ferrer (original “Kathy Selden” in the first National Tour of Singin' in the Rain) with musical direction by Keith Harrison.”

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EVERYTHING IS ILLUMINATED

“ENSEMBLE THEATRE COMPANY (ETC) presents the fourth show of its 40th Anniversary Season, the Southern California premiere of the stunning and wildly popular novel by Jonathan Safran Foer, EVERYTHING IS ILLUMINATED, adapted by Simon Block and directed by Jonathan Fox.
Jonathan, a young Jewish-American writer, travels to Ukraine to seek out the woman who may have saved his grandfather from the Nazis. He hires Alex, a young Ukrainian tour guide who takes him on a hilarious road trip in search of the woman's village. Along the way, they confront haunting memories as Jonathan and Alex's histories become entwined.”

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Moving On: The One-Acts 2019

“Moving On: The 2019 One Acts features a mix of established playwrights and exciting, emerging younger talent.”

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Boxing Lessons

“A ferociously dark and hilarious new comedy by award-winning playwright John Bunzel (63 Trillion, Death of a Buick). When a famous writer dies under mysterious circumstances, family and friends gather in his cabin on a remote island in the Puget Sound to box up his belongings. As they go through the clutter dad left behind, hidden family secrets come to light — and they come to realize just how much they both despise and love one another.”

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A Bad Year for Tomatoes

“Fed up with the pressures and demands of her acting career, the famous Myra Marlowe leases a house in the tiny Vermont hamlet of Beaver Haven, and settles down to write her autobiography. She is successful in turning aside the offers pressed on her by her long-time agent, but dealing with her nosy, omnipresent neighbors is a different matter. In an attempt to shoo them away, and gain some privacy, Myra invents a mad, homicidal sister – who is kept locked in an upstairs room, but who occasionally escapes long enough to scare off uninvited visitors. The ruse works well, at first, but complications result when the local handyman conceives an affection for “Sister Sadie' (really Myra in a fright wig) and some of the more officious ladies decide it is their Christian duty to save the poor demented Sadie's soul. In desperation, Myra announces that her imaginary sibling has suddenly gone off to Boston – which brings on the sheriff, and the suspicion of murder!”

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Twisted Broadway

“'Twisted Broadway' promises to be an irreverent afternoon offering your favorite Broadway tunes turned upside down and inside out...Theatre LA Cares, LA's newest producing company, is committed to empowerment, healing, and dignity, and robustly supports Time's Up so that someday soon no one will ever have to say, “me, too” again. Time's Up is a unified call for change from women in entertainment and for women everywhere. From movie sets to farm fields to boardrooms alike, Time's Up envisions nationwide leadership that reflects the world in which we live.”

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The First Wives Fight Club

“A musical parody of the cult film classics “The First Wives Club” and “Fight Club” starring Raja, Brooke Lynn Hytes, Ginger Minj, Peaches Christ, and more. Written and directed by Varla Jean Merman & Peaches Christ.”

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Duet for One

“A famous concert violinist is stricken with a disease which necessitates her retirement from the stage and which threatens her marriage as well. The play is structured as a series of interviews between the violinist and her psychiatrist in which she tries to cope with her illness and its effect on her life. Featuring Mia Christou and Howard Leder. ”

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Brain Problems

“A world premiere comedy by Malcolm Barrett, directed by Bernardo Cubría. After being diagnosed with ‘brain problems,' a cynical man copes with his life-threatening condition by retreating into his imagination.”

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The Fantasticks by Tom Jones & Harvey Schmidt

“The Fantasticks by Tom Jones & Harvey Schmidt
Produced through special arrangement with Music Theatre International
“Try To Remember” a time when this romantic charmer wasn't enchanting audiences around the world. The Fantasticks is the longest-running musical in the world and with good reason: at the heart of its breathtaking poetry and subtle theatrical sophistication is a purity and simplicity that transcends cultural barriers. The result is a timeless fable of love that manages to be nostalgic and universal at the same time.”

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Dying for Our Voices

“Our journalists are in danger – being forsaken by their people and slaughtered for their pursuit of the truth. As a multidisciplinary piece performed in three different languages, Dying for Our Voices explores that pursuit's high costs, its global impacts, and personal consequences. ”

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The End of Sex

“It's Nancy's birthday. Her daughter and son-in-law come to take the parents out to celebrate. But when new desires and old frustrations collide over dinner, all four slide into a tense standoff as Nancy questions her own collusion with the sexual agreements and power dynamics within her own marriage. Using cutting humor and venturing into tricky territory, The End of Sex (Or What's Wrong With Mom) wrestles with how sexual behavior encourages and creates power arrangements – even in consensual relations.”

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Valley of the Dolls

“An all-star benefit reading of Jacqueline Susann's Valley of the Dolls, directed by Richard Hochberg. Susann's infamous tale of cutthroat careerism, wild sex, and fierce female protagonists will be on hilarious display for two nights only. The cast features (in alphabetical order) Steve Bluestein, Wilson Cruz, Joely Fisher, Mo Gaffney, Robert Gant, Tom Lenk, Greg Louganis, Alec Mapa, Laraine Newman, Sheryl Lee Ralph, Gordon Thomson, Joan Van Ark, Bruce Vilanch, Marissa Jaret Winokur.
One hundred percent of the proceeds will benefit Alcott Center for Mental Health Services and the Los Angeles LGBT Center.”

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Wild Son: The Testimony of Christian Brando

“Set under the white-hot glare of Hollywood and Celebrity, “Wild Son: The Testimony of Christian Brando” tells the story of Marlon Brando's troubled, headline-making son…in his own words. Written by Champ Clark and featuring John Mese as Christian, this 59-minute one-act–based on personal interviews conducted by Clark and populated by the likes of Jack Nicholson, Michael Jackson, Johnny Depp, Sean Penn, Anjelica Huston, Robert Blake and others–is, most importantly, the story of father and son.”

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Argonautika

“In this fresh retelling of the classic Greek myth, Jason and his quest for the Golden Fleece has been reframed for our time. Join the fantastic voyage and encounter Hercules, Hera, sirens, centaurs, and more—familiar mythological figures imbued with unexpected character and depth. Discover humor, love, and the unimaginable as Tony Award® winner Mary Zimmerman reveals the humanity in the most monstrous of creatures in this unforgettable journey for the ages.”

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Noises Off

“One of ANW's most beloved production is back: Your favorites are ready to rein in the chaos of this joyfully out-of-control British farce about the auspiciously titled play-within-a-play Nothing On. Step behind the curtain and meet the under-rehearsed and over-worked cast and crew with a penchant for drama more personal than professional. As the production progresses, the bumbling cast brings down the house—literally!
Better Lemons readers receive $5 off with the discount code ANWLemon when you purchase your tickets.”

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Let's Write a Musical

“David Hamilton decides to write a romantic musical comedy with his wife to cheer himself up when he's diagnosed with cancer. “Let's Write a Musical “ is the musical they wrote together with the story of their cancer journey weaving through it. Based on a true story.”

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SkyPilot Runway - A Funny Thing Happened On The Way To Divorce

“A Funny Thing …, written by Jeff Gould and directed by Margaret Starbuck, introduces three couples, all going through difficult divorces, as they anxiously and frustratingly wait in a room at a courthouse for an appointment with a mediator. Conversations begin, details of each of their troubled marriages are revealed and they eventually learn more about themselves and their relationships in just hours than they have in years of matrimony.”

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Maroo Village the Musical

“In the Korean language with English Subtitles. In the summer of 2014, Ezekiel Drama Ministry's third project, the musical Maroo Village opened. The musical explores the definition of church and defines it as not a place, but the people themselves. Maroo Village was a success that broke records leading to multiple encore shows in the same year. The Ezekiel is now opening a remastered version that takes on the original 1hr 20 minutes of the musical Maroo Village to a full-length 2-hour musical...this creative Christian musical Maroo Village pertains to 20 actors [and]...There are 24 songs from various genres including Korean folk songs, opera, classic musical, retro rock, hip hop, and waltz.”

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WORKING 2020

“The Actors Gym, in association with the Whitefire Theatre, present WORKING 2020. Created and written by Academy Award winner Bobby Moresco (Crash, Million Dollar Baby), and members of the Actors Gym, produced by Bryan Rasmussen, Bobby Moresco, and Steven Christopher Parker. Working 2020 explores what work means to different people in different circumstances in the U.S. today, adding new characters, and this time focusing on the sadly relevant slide from middle to working class.”

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LET ME HEAR YOU WHISPER & THE STRANGEST KIND OF ROMANCE

“The Group Rep presents two unusual one-acts, Paul Zindel's LET ME HEAR YOU WHISPER directed by Katelyn Ann Clark, and Tennessee Williams' THE STRANGEST KIND OF ROMANCE directed by JC Gafford. LET ME HEAR YOU WHISPER concerns a cleaning lady working in a mysterious lab where experiments are being conducted on mammals. Drawn to one of the subjects, she is shocked when she learns the gentle creature's fate is in danger. In THE STRANGEST KIND OF ROMANCE the proprietress of a boarding house tells a potential tenant that one of the former tenants left his cat behind. This highly unusual piece is peopled with fascinating, strongly-opinionated characters, and someone falls in love with … the cat.”

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Sand Moon

“What does it mean to love someone? What do we do when that person becomes unrecognizable? When a brother and sister start bringing their girlfriends on family vacations, a house built on secrets begins to shift. The push and pull of the ones we love gives us one of two options: resist or relent? WORLD PREMIERE.”

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Dorothy's Adventures in Oz

“A vibrant, joyful family-friendly musical comedy that follows a grown-up Dorothy on the quest to return to OZ… Based on characters created by L. Frank Baum, the originator of the first fourteen Oz books ... Follow the escapades of Dorothy and her companions along the windy road to that mystical place where dreams really do come true and nothing is as it seems…along the way, help Dorothy save her family farm, do battle with the vain but glorious Queen Coo-ee-oh, join forces with a vagabond princess who is revolting (although she doesn't look it), meet a magical Patchwork Girl, a Rainbow Maiden and help to set free the King of the Rainbow, face such looming monsters as war, drought and mortgages, learn a great deal about the world around us, and even a little bit about ourselves.”

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Willy's Lil Virgin Queen

“Winner of the 2017 Hollywood Fringe Festival Encore Producer's Award. Willy's Lil Virgin Queen illuminates one woman's journey to discover strength and empowerment and triumph over tragedy as she finds her true power through the words of a playwright; William Shakespeare. This urgently-paced, hilarious and dark coming-of-age-story dives deeply into the many roles that a woman plays on her road from girlhood to womanhood, and it does not shy away from the darker aspects of finding one's own purpose in a world that tells girls to shut-up and look pretty. As was true for the original Virgin Queen Elizabeth, in a man's world it takes a woman to rule herself, and one woman in particular to learn that that within the words of the greatest playwright in history there is truth and within every woman there is a queen.”

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(mostly)musicals: KEEP THE CHANGE

“(mostly)musicals returns to Upstairs at Vitello's with it's 32nd edition on April 8th with a cabaret you'll flip for! Join music director Gregory Nabours and a stellar cast of singers from LA and Broadway for an exciting evening featuring songs about changing your mind, changing the world, changing your clothes, and maybe just spare change!”

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Disrobed

“The producers of the HFF16 immersive hit, Love the Body Positive, are back with the full length comedy, “Disrobed: Why so clothes-minded?” The play has been adapted and updated by Steven Vlasak (HFF18's Nights at The Algonquin Roundtable) from the British naturist classic, “Barely Proper” by Tom Cushing. It's Meet The Parents with a twist! Skye is about to introduce her conservative boyfriend to her family. But she's never told him that she and her family are all nudists! Will their relationship survive? Once again, this immersive theatre experience requires the audience to be in their birthday suits. Don't forget to bring a clothes bag and a towel to sit on! All photography is prohibited and all cellphones must be turned off and stored in the clothes bag upon entering the venue”

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Peter and the Starcatcher

“Tony-winning Peter and the Starcatcher upends the century-old story of how a miserable orphan comes to be The Boy Who Would Not Grow Up (a.k.a. Peter Pan). A wildly theatrical adaptation of Dave Barry and Ridley Pearson's best-selling novels, including marauding pirates and jungle tyrants to unwilling comrades and unlikely heroes, Peter and the Starcatcher playfully explores the depths of greed and despair… and the bonds of friendship, duty and love. ”

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Scarlett Fever

“In 1936, producer David O'Selznick began a 2 year search to find an unknown to play Scarlett O'Hara in Gone with the Wind. The story unfolds in 10 moments incorporating stylized movement, dance, song, original text, several suitcases, and the great Scarlett dress. All accompanied by live percussion.”

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Homeward LA 2019

“Homeward L.A. 2019 is a program consisting of eleven monologues based on stories of people who've experienced homelessness. Actors of Theatre 40 will perform the show, directed by one of Theatre 40's regular directors, Jules Aaron. Proceeds benefit Midnight Mission.”

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Old Jews Telling Jokes

“'Old Jews Telling Jokes,' which has been called a 'pickle-barrel full of giggles,' showcases five actors in a revue-type production that pays tribute to and reinvents classic jokes of the past and present. It celebrates the rich tradition of Jewish humor and ‘all the rabbis, complaining wives, fed-up husbands, patience-challenged physicians, gossiping ladies, and competitive men' populating it. The humor is suggestive and even raunchy as the ‘Old Jews' make fun of themselves as well as followers of every other religion ... Warning: adult (bawdy) humor. Not for audiences under 21.”

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WHAT I DID FOR A JOB

“In What I Did for… a Job, J. Elaine humorously reveals her unique approach to auditioning and what it took to book 10 Broadway Shows. “I had to learn to break the “rules” in order to be noticed. Many of my audition pieces were practically cabaret acts so I put them in a show.” says Broadway veteran. J. Elaine was last seen playing ‘Alexi Darling” in RENT: LIVE . “I've also added some inside scoop about doing RENT: LIVE.”

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Crime and Punishment

“This award-winning adaptation of Fyodor Dostoevsky's famous novel is a thrilling 90-minute psychological inquiry into the troubled mind of a murderer. Dive into the greatest crime story ever written, a tale of murder, motive and redemption that plumbs the depths of the human soul. Written for only three actors, Crime and Punishment stars Michael Trevino (CW's Roswell, New Mexico; The Vampire Diaries) as Raskolnikov, with Lola Kelly (Circle X, Chance Theatre, SCR, REDCAT) and Brian Wallace (End of the Rainbow at La Mirada, Cash on Delivery at the El Portal) playing all the other characters. 'Engrossing theater… will banish any bad memories you might have of trying to struggle through Dostoyevsky's book'”

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Yes. No. Maybe.

“What would you do for a million dollars? What would you do for someone you love? Can we ever be certain that we'll NEVER do something like have sex for money or career advancement? Thorne & his wife Fleur find themselves in a modern day twist of the Indecent Proposal scenario. Yes, people are being targeted by sexual predators, but what about the people who consciously use sex to get ahead? “Yes. No. Maybe.” examines the moral implications of the ways in which we all prostitute ourselves to advance our careers, improve our bank balances, stay in power, keep a roof over our heads, or get whatever it is we feel we ‘need' to survive, be happy or feel validated ... 'Yes. No. Maybe.' is a dramedy of manners for an adult audience unafraid to consider the possibility that their morals may not be as set in stone as they'd like to believe…Comedy, drama and a splash of contemporary dance merge to create a unique theatrical experience.”

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Cirque du Giselle

“Giselle is an ethereal, “Fringe Festival” contemporary take on the classic ballet. Giselle, a sickly peasant girl , falls in love with, and subsequently dies of a broken heart after discovering her love is actually betrothed to another. A dark and tragic love story of deceit, heartbreak, consequences, and redemption – where love eventually triumphs over vengeance from the grave and beyond. Brought to life on the stage in a swirl of aerial and cirque magic!”

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Octopi Wall Street

“Octopi Wall Street addresses the subject of climate change through a series of vignettes told from the perspective of both human and non-human entities (think drunk birds, drag queen barley, algae, and a glacier). The play is based on extensive research of mainstream media articles dealing with off-beat aspects of global warming and climate change. The opening monologue of the play recently won a nationally recognized award at the Region 8 Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival as its 2019 Monologue Selection.”

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Now Registered on the Better Lemons Calendar – January 14 - 27, 2019

Theatrical shows and Workshops registered on the Better Lemons calendar! For more shows visit our Calendar. For shows with a LemonMeter rating, visit our LemonMeter page.

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