THE BETTER LEMONS "I LOVE LA" CRITIC AWARD FOR 2019 GOES TO...

 PAUL MYRVOLD - Paul Myrvold's Theatre Notes

The "I Love LA" Award goes to the critic who did the most to promote LA Theatre in 2019.

Congratulations to Paul from all of us!

Paul Myrvold, has been writing theatre commentary for over thirty years, first in the Bay Area covering every kind of performance including plays, musicals, ballet, opera, circus, and even a Portuguese-style bull fight. He has written about theatrical performances at all levels in all kinds of venues from the premiere theatres, such as A.C.T., Berkeley Rep and TheatreWorks, to smaller, high quality venues such as San Jose Stage Company, City Lights Theatre Company, and Pacific Repertory Theatre in Carmel. He has also covered community theatre productions, college and university productions and, on occasion, high school productions.

Now residing in Southern California, Paul has been commenting on shows throughout Los Angeles County and has stretched his beat to Orange County and South Coast Repertory.

An Equity actor for over forty years, Paul played Jonathan Jeremiah Peachum in San Jose Stage Company’s award winning production of The Three Penny Opera and the dual roles of Sir Walter Elliot and Admiral Croft in the world premiere of Jane Austen’s Persuasion also at San Jose Stage Company. He earned a Bay Area Theatre Critics Circle Award for “Outstanding Performance” in the supporting roles of J. V. “Major” Bouvier and Dr. Norman Vincent Peale in the musical Grey Gardens at TheatreWorks (2008). In the summer of 2018, he appeared in the highly acclaimed Open Fist Theatre production of Dylan Thomas’ Under Milk Wood as Reverend Jenkins and Narrator. Paul has performed on Broadway (most notably in the hit show Shenandoah with John Cullum), off Broadway, off-off Broadway, in regional theatres, summer stock and as a Guest Artist at colleges and universities from coast to coast. He has performed his signature role Cervantes/Quixote in Man of La Mancha eight times over four decades, the latest of which was an intimate, theatre-in-the round production at Pacific Repertory Theatre. Some other favorite roles include King Lear, Fred Graham / Petruchio in Kiss Me, Kate, Trigorin in The Sea Gull, Fredrik Egerman in A Little Night Music and Caldwell B. Cladwell in Urinetown. Paul is never happier than when he is in the theatre, either on stage or in the audience, and he hopes to see you at intermission or after the show.

To view all of Paul's review excerpts, visit his Better Lemons page HERE.

To view all the Registered Critics on Better Lemons who post their own review excerpts and give each show a LemonMeter rating, go to Better-Lemons.com/Registered-Critics.

All Registered Critics write theater and art reviews for their own publications and then rate registered shows on our website and add their LemonMeter rating. Please contact them through their own website to congratulate them and to get them to review your production.

Tomorrow we will announce the winner of the "Enlightenment" Award - the critic who did the most to inform and educate in 2019.

THE BETTER LEMONS "FOMENTER OF REVOLUTION" CRITIC AWARD for 2019 went to Ed Rampell from Hollywood Progressive.

THE BETTER LEMONS "NAME DROPPER" CRITIC AWARD for 2019 went to Jill Weinlein from Onstage Blog.

THE BETTER LEMONS "SAY WHAT" CRITIC AWARD for 2019 went to Lorenzo Marchessi from The Geek Authority.

THE BETTER LEMONS "SILVER TONGUE" CRITIC AWARD for 2019 went to Vanessa Cate from Stage Raw.

THE BETTER LEMONS "DIRECTOR" CRITIC AWARD for 2019 went to Ernest Kearney from TheTVolution.

THE BETTER LEMONS "UP LATE" CRITIC AWARD for 2019 went to Eric Gordon from People's World.

THE BETTER LEMONS "THEATRE HOUND" CRITIC AWARD for 2019 went to Shari Barrett from Broadway World.


Audio Interview: Carlos Lacámara the author of NOWHERE ON THE BORDER

A border watch volunteer confronts a Mexican man who claims to be looking for his missing daughter. Set in a hostile wasteland between nations, Nowhere on the Border reveals the personal dramas that drive people to cross borders both physical and emotional.*

Enjoy this interview with Carlos Lacámara the author of “NOWHERE ON THE BORDER at the Road Theatre, playing through Mar 8th. You can listen to this interview while commuting, while waiting in line at the grocery store or at an audition, backstage and even front of the stage. For tickets and more info Click here.

*taken from the website


THE BETTER LEMONS "THEATRE HOUND" CRITIC AWARD FOR 2019 GOES TO...

SHARI BARRETT - Broadway World

The "Theatre Hound" Award goes to the critic most likely to review the hidden gems, off the beaten path, those with short runs and small budgets.

Congratulations to Shari from all of us!

Shari Barrett, a Los Angeles native, has been active in the theater world since the age of six - acting, singing, and dancing her way across the boards all over town. After teaching in local secondary schools, working in marketing for several studios, writing, directing, producing, and performing in productions for several non-profit theaters, Shari now dedicates her time and focuses her skills as an independent publicist to "get the word out" about smaller theaters throughout the Los Angeles area. As a founding member of the LA Stage Alliance Leadership Council Task Force, she and reps from theaters throughout the city worked together to articulate a vision for the theatre community of Greater Los Angeles. Shari has received recognition from the City of Los Angeles for her dedication of heart and hand to the needs of friends, neighbors and fellow members of society for her devotion of service to the people of Los Angeles, and is honored to serve the theatre world in her hometown.

To view all of Shari's review excerpts, visit her Better Lemons page HERE.

To view all the Registered Critics on Better Lemons who post their own review excerpts and give each show a LemonMeter rating, go to Better-Lemons.com/Registered-Critics.

All Registered Critics write theater and art reviews for their own publications and then rate registered shows on our website and add their LemonMeter rating. Please contact them through their own website to congratulate them and to get them to review your production.

Tomorrow we will announce the winner of the "I Love LA" Award - the critic who did the most to promote LA Theatre in 2019.

THE BETTER LEMONS "FOMENTER OF REVOLUTION" CRITIC AWARD for 2019 went to Ed Rampell from Hollywood Progressive.

THE BETTER LEMONS "NAME DROPPER" CRITIC AWARD for 2019 went to Jill Weinlein from Onstage Blog.

THE BETTER LEMONS "SAY WHAT" CRITIC AWARD for 2019 went to Lorenzo Marchessi from The Geek Authority.

THE BETTER LEMONS "SILVER TONGUE" CRITIC AWARD for 2019 went to Vanessa Cate from Stage Raw.

THE BETTER LEMONS "DIRECTOR" CRITIC AWARD for 2019 went to Ernest Kearney from TheTVolution.

THE BETTER LEMONS "UP LATE" CRITIC AWARD for 2019 went to Eric Gordon from People's World.


Rosie Glen-Lambert Pens Intriguing Work for the Attic Collective

The Attic Collective has devised a new intriguing play entitled "I Decided I'm Fine: A Roach Play" written by Rosie Glen-Lambert and Veronica Tjioe and directed by Rosie Glen-Lambert. Glen-Lambert (pictured above) talks to us in great detail about the Attic Collective and this fascinating new work.

Tell first and foremost about the mission of The Attic Collective.

R G-L: The Attic Collective is a community of diverse young artists whose unique approach to live performance strives to redefine theatre, both in who it is for and what it can be. Our work investigates the human experience with equal parts joy and profundity; by utilizing magical realism, clowning, movement, music, and an emphasis on design, our work tackles universal questions through a lens of wonder and discovery. We offer our audiences universes unbound by the rules of reality as a sanctuary of escape to, and not from, their own emotions. We create theatre for theatre-lovers, theatre-haters, theatre-skeptics, theatre-believers, theatre professionals, theatre novices, or, put more simply: we create theatre for everyone.

How does this revamped play I Decided I'm Fine: A Roach Play fit into the mission?

R G-L: This is a play which tackles very difficult subject matter, so it would be easy for it to be two hours of difficult-to-watch drama. But our company believes in exploring the complexity of human emotion from seemingly unlikely vantage points. There is clowning in this show. There is comedy in this show. There is a fifteen minute cockroach musical in this show. It is our belief that, rather than minimizing the weightiness of this play, these moments of levity bring our audience closer to the emotional stakes present. Laughing one minute and crying the next is our brand. It is how we take care of our audience, assuring them that emotional release and enjoyment are not mutually exclusive. This is a very “Attic Collective” show.

The show is about hoarding. I am a hoarder myself, so can definitely relate to how serious a problem this is. What inspired you to write a play about this issue?

R G-L: It’s fascinating to me who self-identifies as a “hoarder” and who doesn’t. As a person who has held on to every note I’ve received since childhood and who cannot bring myself to throw out a single VHS tape in my storage unit, I used to sort of casually self-identify, finding it to be a kind of humorous self-deprecation. But the question of who and what a hoarder is is unbelievably complex. As we have been developing and discussing this show over the past two years I’ve gotten to hear varying responses to this classification. I Decided I’m Fine: A Roach Play was created after our company was commissioned by another theatre company to create a new, devised work as part of their season. The space we would be creating it for was wonderful but intimate-just 35 seats and two entrances. As we were pondering the best way to make the intimate setting for this new piece purposeful, I was simultaneously in the process of making multiple trips to Detroit to help my family sort through my grandmother’s home in preparation for helping her move into a nursing facility. My grandmother, a tough, wonderful woman, had a home teeming with belongings: antiques, documents, receipts, unopened purchases, etc. We always knew she was a collector, but the scale to which she had accumulated only really became evident as we were helping to facilitate this move.

I started to wonder about where this tendency stemmed from. Was it her impoverished upbringing, being raised by Jewish immigrants during the Great Depression? Was it a symptom of her abusive marriage? Had she collected to this extent as a response to her failing memory? I thought about the reality shows we have all become so familiar with, the ones which encourage us to shudder and retch at people who’ve “let things get out of control.” I thought about the way these shows focus on the symptoms of each “hoarder’s” lifestyle, giving little or no attention to the source of the compulsion. I thought about the way these shows are meant for entertainment. I did research about Compulsive Hoarding Disorder, and the ways in which hoarding is most often a response to a trauma. I thought about the way wealthier people are often considered “collectors” rather than hoarders because of the space they have to store their objects. I thought about my own overflowing storage unit (filled with things I inherited from my grandmother) and wondered what my own children will say about me as they facilitate my move one day. The topic felt too rich not to investigate further, so I brought it to the Company and we began devising this play.

The play concerns a serious problem with a couple who are experiencing a serious loss. How does the magic and clowning play into this scenario? How, as director, do you meet the challenges of the switch in tone?

R G-L: Hoarding is an incredibly delicate issue that is frequently handled indelicately. For many people, their only familiarity with the topic comes from reality television which has stigmatized and sensationalized the behavior. In creating a new piece of theatre which aimed to address hoarding empathetically, it felt impossible not to grapple with this cultural touchstone directly. We watched several episodes of both A&E’s “Hoarders” And TLC’s “Hoarding: Buried Alive” as research and were struck by the presentational quality of these shows. Each “Hoarder’s” life was compressed into an hour-long episode where the most shocking and disturbing details were highlighted for the viewers benefit. This steered us towards a framing device for our show which addresses the sensationalism of these reality shows somewhat directly: celebrity doctors/lifestyle coach type characters who “present” the core story of Ellen, a woman who is hoarding as a response to loss. These characters are inherently clowns, representing a removal from the sympathy the audience may feel for Ellen. Separately, there is another frame through which the audience can watch the performance which highlights through magic and abstraction the comfort (as well as the distress) that Ellen gains from her accumulation. How do these different framing devices work together? I think quite similarly to the way we approach this topic in real life. Hoarding is something you are asked to gawk and laugh at when you’re watching strangers on television. It is something you feel sad about when you watch it have a stronghold over someone you love. It is something that can at times feel magical, like an incredible archive of a person’s life. The tonal shifts ask the audience to grapple with the complexity of the behavior itself.

Why did you revamp the original version of the play? Did audience reaction suggest this?

R G-L: As a company, we have created a number of new plays through our distinctive devising process which have all been well-attended and well-received. But I Decided I’m Fine: A Roach Play, which was originally performed in August of 2018, had a unique effect on our audience. It elicited the most vulnerable post-show conversations, resulted in the most thoughtful next-day email messages, and we continued to hear about the way it stuck with our audiences long past its final performance. People who thought coming in to the performance they had no personal connection to the subject matter left empathizing with friends and family, and people for whom the topic was deeply personal entered the performance with trepidation and left feeling validated and hungry for deeper conversation. And, thrillingly, a number of patrons who do not typically go to the theatre (some for whom this was their first live theatrical performance!) left excited about seeing more. One patron approached me afterwards to tell me that he “didn’t realize this is what theatre could be.” It felt like it was too special to put back in the vault, so we’ve continued to work on it in the hopes of bringing it to a wider audience.

Attic Collective has received awards and has a fantastic reputation in the theatre community. Could you talk about this a little bit?

R G-L: We are very proud of the work we have created for the Los Angeles community. This past summer, our sold-out run of The Last Croissant, which we produced for the Hollywood Fringe Festival, won Best Ensemble Theatre, Best of the Broadwater, as well as Top of the Fringe, the top honor awarded. We were also nominated for the Larry Cornwall Award for Musical Excellence as well as the Steve Kent Award for Social and Political Change. Our previous Fringe project, Dead Dog’s Bone: A Birthday Play was awarded the 2015 Encore Producer’s Award and earned nominations for Best Direction of the festival as well as Best Performance. Our devised play, What Happened to Where I’ve Been, was chosen to be a part of Son of Semele’s Company Creation Festival in 2017 and enjoyed an extension after the close of the Festival. In addition to the award-winning work we do, we are also extremely proud to offer free theatre workshops that are open to the community. Every three months we gather to hone our skills, create and play. It is a wonderful opportunity for artists to practice their craft and deepen their sense of community. In this way we hope that in addition to making a name for ourselves by creating thoughtful and evocative theatre we are also adding to the Los Angeles theatrical landscape by providing a place for artists to connect with one another.

Is there anything you wish to add?

R G-L: I think this is a special, very difficult play. I hope it can be the beginning of a continued conversation about grief, mental health, stigma and compassion.

Content Warning: Please be advised that the following themes which may be triggering for some audience members are present in this performance: Alcoholism, Anxiety, Compulsive Hoarding Disorder, Death, Death of an infant, Hoarding, Mental Illness.

I Decided I'm Fine: A Roach Play runs Feb. 7 – Mar. 1. It plays Fridays, Saturdays @ 8pm, Sundays 6pm) at Studio/Stage 520 N. Western Ave., Los Angeles, CA 90004

For tickets, visit: TheAtticCollectiveLA.com/i-decided-im-fine-a-roach-play

(Photo credit: Rachel Rambaldi)


THE BETTER LEMONS "UP LATE" CRITIC AWARD FOR 2019 GOES TO...

ERIC GORDON - People's World

The "Up Late" Award goes to the most prolific critic.

Congratulations to Eric from all of us!

Eric Gordon writes for People's World. He has written for dozens of local, national, and international publications, mostly about art, music, culture, religion and politics. His undergraduate degree is from Yale and his doctorate in history is from Tulane. He was director of the Workmen's Circle/Arbeter Ring in Southern California from 1995 to 2010. Eric is the author of Mark the Music: The Life and Work of Marc Blitzstein, and co-author of Ballad of an American: The Autobiography of Earl Robinson. A book he translated from Portuguese (Waving to the Train and Other Stories, by Hadasa Cytrynowicz) appeared in 2013. In 2015 he executive produced City of the Future, a CD of Soviet Yiddish music from the 1930s. He is the former Southern California Chapter Chair of the National Writers Union (Local 1981 UAW/AFL-CIO).

To view all of Eric's review excerpts, visit his Better Lemons page HERE.

To view all the Registered Critics on Better Lemons who post their own review excerpts and give each show a LemonMeter rating, go to Better-Lemons.com/Registered-Critics.

All Registered Critics write theater and art reviews for their own publications and then rate registered shows on our website and add their LemonMeter rating. Please contact them through their own website to congratulate them and to get them to review your production.

Tomorrow we will announce the winner of the "Theatre Hound" Award - which goes to the critic most likely to review the hidden gems, off the beaten path, those with short runs and small budgets.

THE BETTER LEMONS "FOMENTER OF REVOLUTION" CRITIC AWARD for 2019 went to Ed Rampell from Hollywood Progressive.

THE BETTER LEMONS "NAME DROPPER" CRITIC AWARD for 2019 went to Jill Weinlein from Onstage Blog.

THE BETTER LEMONS "SAY WHAT" CRITIC AWARD for 2019 went to Lorenzo Marchessi from The Geek Authority.

THE BETTER LEMONS "SILVER TONGUE" CRITIC AWARD for 2019 went to Vanessa Cate from Stage Raw.

THE BETTER LEMONS "DIRECTOR" CRITIC AWARD for 2019 went to Ernest Kearney from TheTVolution.


Now Registered on the Better Lemons Calendar – January 27 - February 3, 2020


Theatrical, One-Person, Musicals, and Comedy shows, Music, Dance, and Cabaret now registered on the Better Lemons calendar!

For shows with a LemonMeter rating, visit our LemonMeter page.


Sugar Houses

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Looking for Leroy

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Cafe Vida

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The Andrews Brothers

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Taming the Lion

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Birthday Wish

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Uncle Vanya

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Matt & Ben

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The Secret Comedy of Women

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Our Man in Santiago

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Shades of War The play

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Melinda Doolittle - The Great American Soul Book

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The World is My Home: The Life of Paul Robeson

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A Good Day to Fly

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THE BETTER LEMONS "DIRECTOR" CRITIC AWARD FOR 2019 GOES TO...

ERNEST KEARNEY - The TVolution

The "Director" Award goes to the critic who is most likely to write reviews that inform the artists.

Congratulations to Ernest from all of us!

Ernest Kearney is an award-winning L.A. playwright and rabble-rouser of note. He has worked as literary manager or as dramaturge for among others The Hudson Theater Guild, Nova Diem and the Odyssey Ensemble Theatre, where he still serves on the play selection committee. He has been the recipient of two Dramalogue Awards and a finalist or semi-finalist three times in the Julie Harris Playwriting Competition. His play Peddle was selected by the Midwest Theatre Network as one of the best plays of 1997. His most recent work 'The Salt Prince' was awarded honors from the Nathan Miller History Play Contest as well as the Fremont Center Theatre Play Contest. A passionate theatre and history buff, Mr. Kearney's reviews can be found on WorkingAuthor.com and TheTVolution.com.

To view all of Ernest's review excerpts, visit his Better Lemons page HERE.

To view all the Registered Critics on Better Lemons who post their own review excerpts and give each show a LemonMeter rating, go to Better-Lemons.com/Registered-Critics.

All Registered Critics write theater and art reviews for their own publications and then rate registered shows on our website and add their LemonMeter rating. Please contact them through their own website to congratulate them and to get them to review your production.

On Monday we will announce the winner of the "Up Late" Award - the award that goes to the most prolific critic in 2019.

THE BETTER LEMONS "FOMENTER OF REVOLUTION" CRITIC AWARD for 2019 went to Ed Rampell from Hollywood Progressive.

THE BETTER LEMONS "NAME DROPPER" CRITIC AWARD for 2019 went to Jill Weinlein from Onstage Blog.

THE BETTER LEMONS "SAY WHAT" CRITIC AWARD for 2019 went to Lorenzo Marchessi from The Geek Authority.

THE BETTER LEMONS "SILVER TONGUE" CRITIC AWARD for 2019 went to Vanessa Cate from Stage Raw.


Del Shores Goes This Side of Crazy

Actor/playwright Del Shores certainly needs no introduction. His plays Southern Baptist Sissies, Sordid Lives, and The Trials and Tribulations of a Trailer Trash Housewife have been made into either films or TV series. Shores is opening his latest play This Side of Crazy at the Zephyr Theatre, tonight, January 31. In our conversation he tells our readers about the play in detail. Those who like 'crazy' should not miss this one!

Tell our readers about the story behind This Side of Crazy.

DS: This play has been brewing for years. It all started with my obsession with gospel music. When I listen to the song Son of a Preacher Man, I sometimes go down a YouTube rabbit hole and listen to the music I grew up with, mostly Southern gospel. I became obsessed with Dottie Rambo, who wrote over 2000 gospel songs. Then a crazy thing happened — Dottie Rambo contacted me (around 2005) on MySpace no less and told me she was a fan of Sordid Lives. She sent me a package of all her CDs and even a Dottie Rambo doll. A few months later, we were on tour with the play Sordid Lives and we landed in Nashville, where she lived. I invited her to come see the play where I got to meet her. Then tragically, just a few months later, Dottie was killed when her tour bus crashed. I became even more obsessed with her. And the more I watched her, the more I realized that as she gave God the glory, like many performers, she was also pretty narcissistic. Praising herself while praising Jesus! So, I thought ‘Oh, I could heighten that a little bit’, and I found my character “Ditty Blaylock”.

In another YouTube rabbit hole, I saw these three little girls called The Peasall Sisters singing perfect gospel three-part harmony. These little pastor’s daughters went on to win a Grammy award for doing the voices for George Clooney’s daughters in O Brother, Where Art Thou?.

As I do so often when I write, I started playing the ‘What if’ game. What if Ditty Blaylock was the mother of three girls, little superstars for Jesus. What happened to them when they grew up?’ I then found Rachel, Bethany and Rachel, and as always, my characters started writing their story.

Does This Side of Crazy and Sordid Lives have any similarities?

DS: I guess my humor will always peak through. This was/is darker, with much more drama, more the blend of tones of my last three (Southern Baptist Sissies, The Trials and Tribulations of a Trailer Trash Housewife, and Yellow.) But the themes of family, forgiveness, and secrets are certainly similar to Sordid Lives. It’s not as broad. Less camp, although some would think “Ditty" just may rival “Brother Boy."

These stories come from your past. How much is real and how much is fiction?

DS: This one really is all fiction. Oh sure, there are people I’ve met who inspired characters and characteristics, but I really did create the Blaylocks. I guess if anybody is a little bit me, it would be that wild child “Bethany."

You create wonderful female characters. Explain how females dominated your life growing up.

DS: Oh they were all around me. Starting with my mother, who was a force (some of “Ditty” is certainly my Mom). I was fascinated by my aunts, the women in church and the backsliding relatives who wore lots of make up and had big hair and had very loud voices, with strong opinions. So, yes, I gravitate to tell the stories of woman of a certain age because frankly, I love them.

What is the theme or message in this play?

DS: Family. Forgiveness. And not just that we always need to forgive or are capable - but can we when the crime is so big; depression because of circumstances; sisters/siblings. Like I said, some dark themes in this, but I think many can relate to the stains that so many families have.

What would you like audiences to take away after seeing it?

DS: I want them to first and foremost enjoy an evening or a matinee of theatre. Laugh some, forget that outside world for a couple of hours, maybe think and shed a tear or two. A lot of people will also probably realize that their lives are not all that bad after visiting the Blaylocks.

Tell us about the cast and the chemistry between its members..

DS: It is a ridiculously talented cast. They all started as friends and now have become family. They truly love each other. The play is so intense that we always start by trading hugs. I adore each and every one of them and they are all repeats, having been in other plays, films, or TV of mine.

Anything you wish to add?

DS: Just that it’s amazing to be back doing theatre in Los Angeles. LA is the city that embraced my work as a playwright and I am so very grateful. And, it certainly takes a village. I love my “Crazy” theatre family. The designers, the cast, crew - and my amazing producing partners Emerson Collins and Louise H. Beard.

To make reservations, go to DelShores.com


THE BETTER LEMONS "SILVER TONGUE" CRITIC AWARD FOR 2019 GOES TO...

VANESSA CATE - Stage Raw

The "Silver Tongue" Award goes to the most persuasive critic, capable of enticing anyone into a theatre seat.

Congratulations to Vanessa from all of us!

Vanessa Cate is the Assigning Editor for Stage Raw and former Editor-in-Chief for @thisstage.la. Vanessa is a performance artist, writer, and jack of all trades, and they can be found on stage, in strange audiences, and in interesting situations. Vanessa Cate’s passion for theatre and reverence for fantasy blinds them to how to best live a normal life. Apart from their work with Stage Raw since its inception, Vanessa is the Founder and Artistic Director of the feminist performance-coven known as TheatreWitch, as well as the fantasy dance group Cabaret le Fey. Vanessa performs, writes, directs, and generally creates however and whenever they can.

To view all of Vanessa's review excerpts, visit their Better Lemons page HERE.

To view all the Registered Critics on Better Lemons who post their own review excerpts and give each show a LemonMeter rating, go to Better-Lemons.com/Registered-Critics.

All Registered Critics write theater and art reviews for their own publications and then rate registered shows on our website and add their LemonMeter rating. Please contact them through their own website to congratulate them and to get them to review your production.

Tomorrow we will announce the winner of the "Director" Award - the most persuasive critic, capable of enticing anyone into a theatre seat.

THE BETTER LEMONS "FOMENTER OF REVOLUTION" CRITIC AWARD for 2019 went to Ed Rampell from Hollywood Progressive.

THE BETTER LEMONS "NAME DROPPER" CRITIC AWARD for 2019 went to Jill Weinlein from Onstage Blog.

THE BETTER LEMONS "SAY WHAT" CRITIC AWARD for 2019 went to Lorenzo Marchessi from The Geek Authority.


THE BETTER LEMONS "SAY WHAT?" CRITIC AWARD FOR 2019 GOES TO...

LORENZO MARCHESSI - The Geek Authority

The "Say What?" Award goes to the most provocative critic.

Congratulations to Lorenzo from all of us!

Lorenzo Marchessi is a Chicago born transplant to Southern California who has several degrees in Theatre, Film, Radio, Television, Business and Communications and has worked both on stage and on camera before working directly behind the scenes for stage and screen. Directing over 50 theatrical shows like Annie, A View From The Bridge, and Noises Off for the stage, he has written and produced over 100 shorts, TV spots, and at live entertainment venues. The one thing he has done the most is writing. With stage play, teleplay and screenplay writing credits behind him has received most acclaim and Critics Choice awarded (twice in Illinois as well as Iowa and CA) and has been reviewing since his college days. Currently the owner/President of The Geek Authority which reviews, interviews, does live video feeds and photo expose's at more that 50 conventions a year that feature Fantasy / Sci-Fi / Anime / Comics / TV / Films / Products / Music / Toys / Celebrities / Pop Culture related events. Also, Lorenzo is constantly reviewing over 150 theatrical events (plays. concerts, opera, live entertainment) a year all over Southern CA, AZ and NV. The Geek Authority is now over 10 years old and has expanded with correspondents all over the country.

To view all of Lorenzo's review excerpts, visit his Better Lemons page HERE.

To view all the Registered Critics on Better Lemons who post their own review excerpts and give each show a LemonMeter rating, go to Better-Lemons.com/Registered-Critics.

All Registered Critics write theater and art reviews for their own publications and then rate registered shows on our website and add their LemonMeter rating. Please contact them through their own website to congratulate them and to get them to review your production.

Tomorrow we will announce the winner of the "Silver Tongue" Award - the most persuasive critic, capable of enticing anyone into a theatre seat.

THE BETTER LEMONS "FOMENTER OF REVOLUTION" CRITIC AWARD for 2019 went to Ed Rampell from Hollywood Progressive.

THE BETTER LEMONS "NAME DROPPER" CRITIC AWARD for 2019 went to Jill Weinlein from Onstage Blog.


Audio Interview: the cast of "Sunday Dinner" at THEATRE 40

An Italian-American family in the Bronx comes together for a momentous dinner, where a number of secrets, some old and some new, will be revealed.*

Enjoy this interview with the cast of “Sunday Dinner” at Theatre 40, running until Feb 16th. You can listen to this interview while commuting, while waiting in line at the grocery store or at an audition, backstage and even front of the stage. For tickets and more info Click here.

*taken from the website


THE BETTER LEMONS "Name Dropper" CRITIC AWARD FOR 2019 GOES TO...

JILL WEINLEIN from Onstage Blog

"Name Dropper" Award goes to the critic who is most likely to review the big shows in the big theatres with the big names and the big budgets.

Congratulations to Jill from all of us!

Jill Weinlein graduated from UCLA with a B.A. in Theater Arts. Her training gave her an understanding and appreciation for the writing, directing, acting and the technical team. Besides reviewing community and big Broadway shows, she lives in Los Angeles and writes restaurant reviews for the Beverly Press and Park LaBrea News. Her reviews can be viewed on dineandtravel.me.

To view all of Jill's review excerpts, visit her Better Lemons page HERE.

To view all the Registered Critics on Better Lemons who post their own review excerpts and give each show a LemonMeter rating, go to Better-Lemons.com/Registered-Critics.

All Registered Critics write theater and art reviews for their own publications and then rate registered shows on our website and add their LemonMeter rating. Please contact them through their own website to congratulate them and to get them to review your production.

Tomorrow we will announce the winner of the "Say What?" Award - the most provocative critic.

THE BETTER LEMONS "FOMENTER OF REVOLUTION" CRITIC AWARD FOR 2019 went to Ed Rampell from Hollywood Progressive.


The Better Lemons "Fomenter of Revolution" Critic Award for 2019 Goes To...

ED RAMPELL from Hollywood Progressive

The "Fomenter of Revolution" Award goes to the Critic who is most likely to stir a conversation about theater, politics, and social justice.

Congratulations to Ed from all of us at Better Lemons!

Ed Rampell is an L.A.-based full-time freelance writer and author. He majored in Cinema at Manhattan’s Hunter College. After graduating, Rampell lived in Tahiti, Samoa, Hawaii, and Micronesia, reporting on the nuclear free and independent Pacific and Hawaiian Sovereignty movements for: ABC News’ “20/20,” Reuters, AP, Radio Australia, Radio New Zealand, NewsWeek, Honolulu Weekly, etc. In 1999 Rampell relocated to L.A. and contributed to: “The Finger” column for New Times L.A., Variety, Written By, The Nation, L.A. Times, L.A. Daily News, Financial Times, New York Press, Guardian, The Progressive, Sierra Magazine, Earth Island Journal, Washington Post, The Forward, In These Times, AlterNet, DestinAsian, etc. Rampell currently covers L.A.’s arts scene for: HollywoodProgressive.com, Jesther Entertainment, People’s World, etc.

Rampell co-authored “Conversations with W.S. Merwin” and the film histories: “Made In Paradise, Hollywood’s Films of Hawaii and the South Seas,” “Pearl Harbor in the Movies, and “The Hawaii Movie and Television Book.” Rampell is solo author of the 2005 book “Progressive Hollywood, A People’s Film History of the United States.” Rampell appears in the 2005 Australian documentary “Hula Girls, Imagining Paradise.”

To view all of Ed's review excerpts visit his Better Lemons page HERE.

To view all the Registered Critics on Better Lemons who post their own review excerpts and give each show a LemonMeter rating, go to Better-Lemons.com/Registered-Critics.

All Registered Critics write theater and art reviews for their own publications and then rate registered shows on our website and add their LemonMeter rating. Please contact them through their own website to congratulate them and to get them to review your production.

Tomorrow we will announce the winner of the "Name Dropper" Award - the critic most likely to review the big shows in the big theatres with the big names and the big budgets.