OUR TOWN review

The journey Wilder takes us on through the cycle of life in an ordinary American town is too emotionally pure to resist. The playwright doesn’t say anything we don’t already know, but the playful way he says it helps us to take in a wisdom that no technological breakthrough will ever render obsolete. Best of all, this production of “Our Town” really seems like our town.

..read full review...

HEAD OF PASSES review

“Head of Passes” doesn’t end in catharsis. McCraney denies his audience such consolation. But the knowledge born of suffering that dawns in Rashad’s eyes is a theatrical sight you won’t soon forget.

..read full review...

PLEASE EXCUSE MY DEAR AUNT SALLY review

There’s nothing by the numbers about “Please Excuse My Dear Aunt Sally,” which follows neither the rules of dramaturgy nor morality. It’s impossible to predict how the story will unfold. Armento’s language has a rhythmic vibrancy that creates its own universe, which is accentuated by Smith’s nifty sound design. But it’s Piper’s invigorating incarnation of an eager-to-please phone, a computerized buddy as helpful as it is ultimately helpless, that powers the production.

..read full review...

BIG NIGHT review

Big Night" may be earnest in patches, not entirely convincing and a bit thin, but Rudnick hasn't lost his talent to amuse. The play is funny even when it stumbles and stalls.

..read full review...

HAMILTON review

“Hamilton” is a true ensemble musical, and I found myself admiring more than ever Andy Blankenbuehler’s choreography, which unifies the cast and translates the drama into physical language that’s as lyrical as any of the songwriting. The dancing is heart-stoppingly coordinated with Howell Binkley’s lighting, and the tableaux on David Korins’ nimble set of exposed brick and wooden scaffolding are etched with rousing bodily fluidity.

..read full review...

HEISENBERG review

“Heisenberg” is perhaps most memorable, however, for the way it demonstrates how this dynamic science works on the level of performance. In an equation that operates more like a dance, Parker and Arndt prove that talent is expanded when those slippery variables of time and relativity are factored in.

..read full review...