Cynthia Citron has lived and worked on every continent except Antarctica as a journalist, public relations and communications director, a documentary screenwriter and a theater reviewer. She is also a co-founder of Earthwatch, the scientific research expedition company, and served as the editor of Bostonia, the prize-winning alumni magazine of Boston University.

A DELICATE SHIP review

0%

If you are the type of person who would enjoy sitting through a vicious harangue for a couple of hours, then "A Delicate Ship" is the play for you. The story is set in Brooklyn. It's Christmas Eve and Sarah (Paris Perrault) and Nate (Josh Zuckerman) are spending a quiet evening in her apartment. They are interrupted suddenly, however, by a fierce pounding on the door and a boisterous young man, Sam (Philip Orazio), who bursts into the room and, ignoring Nate completely, begins a rambling, intimate conversation with Sarah. Sam is brash and confrontational. Sarah is confused. Nate is conflicted. Who is this raucous intruder? Sam begins to woo her with happy memories of their time together. She objects and argues with him, but can't help being mesmerized by his vociferous assertiveness. And meanwhile Nate stands by awkwardly, trying to blend into the woodwork.

..read full review...

THE CHOSEN review

100%

“The Chosen” pits two young men against the certainties of their fathers, two very different rabbis. David Malter, played by Jonathan Arkin, is a modern rabbi, an ardent supporter of Israel and a man who contemplates the future with equanimity and hope. The other rabbi, Reb Saunders, played by Alan Blumenfeld, looks to the past and agonizes over it. Reb Saunders is expecting his son to succeed him as a bridge between the people and God. But his son Danny wants to become a psychologist. Malter’s son Reuven is responsive to the wisdom and warmth of his father, but he has no intention of following his father’s profession. The four participants, under the superb direction of Simon Levy, present their opposing positions convincingly and forcefully, dealing with everything from the concepts and admonishments of the Torah to its arcane minutiae.

..read full review...

ROTTERDAM review

50%

The play is intelligent and sensitive. Wellpresented, especially by the two principal actors. And it's genuinely thought-provoking. "Rotterdam," written by Jon Brittain, deals with the emotional turmoil that three women undergo as they confront their self-proclaimed identity as lesbians. Alice (Miranda Wynne) has avoided "coming out" to her parents by running off to Rotterdam with her boyfriend Josh (Ryan Brophy). In the seven years that they have lived in Holland their relationship has evolved from lovers to "best friends." Even though they quarrel constantly Josh continues to hope that they will be together again at some future time. That hope is dashed, however, when Alice meets Josh's sister Fiona (Ashley Romans) and the two women fall in love.

..read full review...

RESOLVING HEDDA review

100%

IN THE 19TH CENTURY A woman’s role was explicitly defined: she was expected to be a charming hostess, a nurturing presence, and an indefatigable supporter of her husband. Her husband, on the other hand, was free to ignore her, to pursue his own individual interests, and to demand her complete subservience. Which may explain why Norwegian playwright Henrik Ibsen’s portrayal of women who deviated from this “norm” and had opinions of their own — and claimed the right to express them — unleashed a storm of criticism from his contemporaries. Which brings us to a contemporary version of “Hedda Gabler”, titled “Resolving Hedda”, which is now having its World Premiere at the Victory Theatre in Burbank. Its author is the brilliantly clever and witty Jon Klein and its director is the inimitable Maria Gobetti, who makes the most of Klein’s hilarious script. ..read full review...

..read full review...

RESOLVING HEDDA review

100%

IN THE 19TH CENTURY A woman’s role was explicitly defined: she was expected to be a charming hostess, a nurturing presence, and an indefatigable supporter of her husband. Her husband, on the other hand, was free to ignore her, to pursue his own individual interests, and to demand her complete subservience. Which may explain why Norwegian playwright Henrik Ibsen’s portrayal of women who deviated from this “norm” and had opinions of their own — and claimed the right to express them — unleashed a storm of criticism from his contemporaries. Which brings us to a contemporary version of “Hedda Gabler”, titled “Resolving Hedda”, which is now having its World Premiere at the Victory Theatre in Burbank. Its author is the brilliantly clever and witty Jon Klein and its director is the inimitable Maria Gobetti, who makes the most of Klein’s hilarious script.

..read full review...

THE RADIANT review

50%

Nina Sallinen is simply terrific channeling the fiery spirit of Marie Curie. She is sorrowful, angry, demanding, persistent, proud, playful, coquettish, loving, and RADIANT. And that last, in fact, is the title of the play. The play tells of Marie and her husband Pierre winning a shared Nobel Prize in Physics in 1903. And in 1911 she won her second Nobel, for Chemistry, for discovering radium and polonium. In between, she conducted a passionate affair with her lab assistant, which resulted in a scandal and caused her much pain, in addition to the vituperation of her colleagues.

..read full review...

A FUNNY THING HAPPENED ON THE WAY TO THE GYNECOLOGIC ONCOLOGY UNIT AT MEMORIAL SLOAN KETTERING CANCER CENTER OF NEW YORK CITY, review

50%

Only it isn’t very funny. It involves a ditzy stand-up comic who never stops talking and a scruffy-looking man who wants only to sit quietly and read his New Yorker. They are inhabiting the shared hospital room of their mothers, who are both dying of cancer.Karla’s comedy deals almost exclusively with sex and as the play opens she is rhapsodizing about her vibrator, even though her mother, Marcie (JoBeth Williams) is asleep and unresponsive for the first two/thirds of the play. In the other bed Don’s mother (Eileen T’Kaye) lies comatose and only wakes up to die. Finally Karla’s mother, Marcie, wakes up and begins to attack her daughter unmercifully. She is cruel and sarcastic, but she does have some funny lines. Karla and Don eventually stop hollering at each other, but you know their relationship, if they have one, is bound to remain dysfunctional.

..read full review...

RUNAWAY HOME review

0%

If you lived in Louisiana, you will remember August 29, 2005, the day that Hurricane Katrina, one of the deadliest hurricanes the country has ever experienced, made landfall and nearly destroyed New Orleans. Among the areas that were hardest hit was the Lower Ninth Ward. A bratty 14-year-old who has run away from home, is wandering around a deserted neighborhood of dilapidated remnants of homes that nobody lives in and nobody has restored. But a ragtag bunch that remained, or have returned, make their way in and out of Kali’s world to tell her about their lives, their expectations, and their disappointments.

..read full review...

SOMEWHERE IN THE MIDDLE review

100%

As the play opens, the family is waiting for daughter Sarah (Julie Lanctot) to return home from Stanford to join them for the Passover holiday.Eventually Sarah reveals that she has invited her friend Jamal to join them for the Passover holiday. The family is happy to include him, but when he arrives they are startled to discover that he is black.Even though the play is set in 2007, the familiar arguments voiced by David, Jamal, and Sarah are no closer to being resolved than they ever were.

..read full review...