Cynthia Citron has lived and worked on every continent except Antarctica as a journalist, public relations and communications director, a documentary screenwriter and a theater reviewer. She is also a co-founder of Earthwatch, the scientific research expedition company, and served as the editor of Bostonia, the prize-winning alumni magazine of Boston University.

RESOLVING HEDDA review

IN THE 19TH CENTURY A woman’s role was explicitly defined: she was expected to be a charming hostess, a nurturing presence, and an indefatigable supporter of her husband. Her husband, on the other hand, was free to ignore her, to pursue his own individual interests, and to demand her complete subservience. Which may explain why Norwegian playwright Henrik Ibsen’s portrayal of women who deviated from this “norm” and had opinions of their own — and claimed the right to express them — unleashed a storm of criticism from his contemporaries. Which brings us to a contemporary version of “Hedda Gabler”, titled “Resolving Hedda”, which is now having its World Premiere at the Victory Theatre in Burbank. Its author is the brilliantly clever and witty Jon Klein and its director is the inimitable Maria Gobetti, who makes the most of Klein’s hilarious script. ..read full review...

..read full review...

RESOLVING HEDDA review

IN THE 19TH CENTURY A woman’s role was explicitly defined: she was expected to be a charming hostess, a nurturing presence, and an indefatigable supporter of her husband. Her husband, on the other hand, was free to ignore her, to pursue his own individual interests, and to demand her complete subservience. Which may explain why Norwegian playwright Henrik Ibsen’s portrayal of women who deviated from this “norm” and had opinions of their own — and claimed the right to express them — unleashed a storm of criticism from his contemporaries. Which brings us to a contemporary version of “Hedda Gabler”, titled “Resolving Hedda”, which is now having its World Premiere at the Victory Theatre in Burbank. Its author is the brilliantly clever and witty Jon Klein and its director is the inimitable Maria Gobetti, who makes the most of Klein’s hilarious script.

..read full review...

THE RADIANT review

Nina Sallinen is simply terrific channeling the fiery spirit of Marie Curie. She is sorrowful, angry, demanding, persistent, proud, playful, coquettish, loving, and RADIANT. And that last, in fact, is the title of the play. The play tells of Marie and her husband Pierre winning a shared Nobel Prize in Physics in 1903. And in 1911 she won her second Nobel, for Chemistry, for discovering radium and polonium. In between, she conducted a passionate affair with her lab assistant, which resulted in a scandal and caused her much pain, in addition to the vituperation of her colleagues.

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A FUNNY THING HAPPENED ON THE WAY TO THE GYNECOLOGIC ONCOLOGY UNIT AT MEMORIAL SLOAN KETTERING CANCER CENTER OF NEW YORK CITY, review

Only it isn’t very funny. It involves a ditzy stand-up comic who never stops talking and a scruffy-looking man who wants only to sit quietly and read his New Yorker. They are inhabiting the shared hospital room of their mothers, who are both dying of cancer.Karla’s comedy deals almost exclusively with sex and as the play opens she is rhapsodizing about her vibrator, even though her mother, Marcie (JoBeth Williams) is asleep and unresponsive for the first two/thirds of the play. In the other bed Don’s mother (Eileen T’Kaye) lies comatose and only wakes up to die. Finally Karla’s mother, Marcie, wakes up and begins to attack her daughter unmercifully. She is cruel and sarcastic, but she does have some funny lines. Karla and Don eventually stop hollering at each other, but you know their relationship, if they have one, is bound to remain dysfunctional.

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RUNAWAY HOME review

If you lived in Louisiana, you will remember August 29, 2005, the day that Hurricane Katrina, one of the deadliest hurricanes the country has ever experienced, made landfall and nearly destroyed New Orleans. Among the areas that were hardest hit was the Lower Ninth Ward. A bratty 14-year-old who has run away from home, is wandering around a deserted neighborhood of dilapidated remnants of homes that nobody lives in and nobody has restored. But a ragtag bunch that remained, or have returned, make their way in and out of Kali’s world to tell her about their lives, their expectations, and their disappointments.

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SOMEWHERE IN THE MIDDLE review

As the play opens, the family is waiting for daughter Sarah (Julie Lanctot) to return home from Stanford to join them for the Passover holiday.Eventually Sarah reveals that she has invited her friend Jamal to join them for the Passover holiday. The family is happy to include him, but when he arrives they are startled to discover that he is black.Even though the play is set in 2007, the familiar arguments voiced by David, Jamal, and Sarah are no closer to being resolved than they ever were.

..read full review...

A FUNNY THING HAPPENED ON THE WAY TO THE GYNECOLOGIC ONCOLOGY UNIT AT MEMORIAL SLOAN KETTERING CANCER CENTER OF NEW YORK CITY, review

Only it isn’t very funny. It involves a ditzy stand-up comic who never stops talking and a scruffy-looking man who wants only to sit quietly and read his New Yorker. They are inhabiting the shared hospital room of their mothers, who are both dying of cancer.Karla’s comedy deals almost exclusively with sex and as the play opens she is rhapsodizing about her vibrator, even though her mother, Marcie (JoBeth Williams) is asleep and unresponsive for the first two/thirds of the play. In the other bed Don’s mother (Eileen T’Kaye) lies comatose and only wakes up to die.

..read full review...

THE DREAMER EXAMINES HIS PILLOW review

This production of “The Dreamer Examines His Pillow”, directed by Mark Blanchard, is enhanced by the three exceptional actors who enliven what might have been a rather static play. The action is all in the intensity of the monologues, which hold your attention throughout.

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GREY NOMAD review

Dan Lee’s play is predictable, boring, and nearly unfathomable due to the garbled accents, quirky vernacular, and fast-paced delivery of the players. Because the play apparently contains many Australian idioms (which you can neither decipher nor understand because of the tortured speech patterns of the players), there is a glossary included in the playbill. For example, “a headless chook” is someone who is not thinking clearly; if someone takes off without warning, he has “dunna runna” (done a runner); and if you say someone is “a bit ‘how’s your father’” you are indicating that the person is odd, “not quite right.”

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A STEADY RAIN - THE BROADWAY SMASH HIT BY KEITH HUFF, 2ND EXTENSION! AUG 4-20 review

Denny (R.J. DeBard), the “bad cop,” is an explosive, out-of-control bully. Joey, the “good cop” (played by Andy Hoff in a consistently supportive and self-effacing manner) takes the brunt of Denny’s bullying, both physical and emotional, turns a blind eye to his partner’s misdemeanors, and covers for him with police officials and with Denny’s wife Connie. Which makes him not always the “good” cop.

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