Rob Stevens began reviewing in 1973for the monthly community theatre magazine, Showcase, covering the professional theatres in Los Angeles. He served as editor/co-publisher of It’s Showtime in 1996-98. He has also been a reviewer/interviewer for Dimension, Data-Boy Magazine, The Civic Star, Frontiers, Frontiers After Dark, Drama-Logue, Backstage West, L.A. Reader, Santa Barbara Independent and a few others. In 1988 he began writing the column West Coast Stages in the national publication Backstage. In recent years he has written for the websites Showmag.com, Theatremania.com, and StageHappenings.com. He is the founder of The Robby Awards which began as a listing in Showcase magazine in 1975 and has since grown into an annual awards show. The 30th Robby Awards were presented in February, 2016. He is a member of the LA Drama Critics Circle.

The Devil's Wife

Eric Hoff’s assured direction keeps the action moving smoothly and quickly and the cast of four each get their moment to shine and shine they do. Wallin does a masterful job as The Devil and as his elderly servant, playing off all three wives with a wicked sense of humor and carefree abandon.

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The Cake

Brunstetter’s writing is pretty much one-sided...Jennifer Chambers has done a fine job of directing and the cast delivers strong performances, especially Rupp. This is one instance where you can see The Cake and get to eat it also (in the lobby after the show).

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Pledge

It’s a simple plot and the actors do a fine job fleshing out the thinly written characters. Their charm and gusto make the time fly past swiftly.

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Metalhead

The cast is game (Nichols and Citron really do well as robots) but they just don’t have the singing prowess to pull of even the lackluster score. Metalhead might work better as just a full out political parody.

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Charlie Moose Makes His Move

Turner has a knack for writing engaging dialogue but she seems to have painted herself into a corner with the utter distastefulness of these characters. Even in the darkest of dark comedies, there has to be some glimmer of light. The cast is totally committed to playing these characters full out under Sam Wilkes’s unflinching direction.

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Psychosical: An Asylum Cabaret

This was by far the best, most involving experience I have been a part of in four years of Fringe Festival attendance. I can’t express how much I long for this show to have an extended run somewhere so I can see it again and again and cajole all my musical theatre friends to witness it.

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Slightly-Off Broadway

Sludikoff proves to be a clever little parodist...The voices aren’t the strongest in Fringe but they are pleasant enough and seem to grow stronger as the show progresses.

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Apathy Killed the Cat

He has created some interesting characters and situations but the whole is not as good as its various parts. His direction mostly just has the cast standing around saying lines. Meow! This needs a rewrite stat!

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