Writer: Travis Michael Holder - Ticket Holders LA

TRAVIS MICHAEL HOLDER is Opinionatedasswipe-in-Chief for the new handydandy arts-oriented website TicketHoldersLA.com. He has been a LA theatre critic since 1987 and has taught acting at the New York Film Academy’s west coast campus since 2010. He was Theatre Editor for Entertainment Today for 21 years, reviewed for BackStage for 12 years, and is also currently a contributor to ArtsInLA.com. As a writer, five of his plays have been produced in LA and his first, "Surprise Surprise," became a feature film in 2010, for which Travis wrote the screenplay and appeared in a leading role. An actor since childhood who originally came to LA under contract to Paramount Pictures, he has appeared in six Broadway productions and has traveled extensively in everything from "Bye Bye Birdie," "Hair," and throughout Europe and Asia in "Hello Dolly" to touring as Amos (Mr. Cellophane) Hart in "Chicago." Locally, Travis received the LA Drama Critics’ Circle Award as Kenneth Halliwell in the west coast premiere of "Nasty Little Secrets," a Drama-Logue Award as Lennie in "Of Mice and Men," and he has also received six acting nominations from LA Weekly; a Sage Award; Ovation, GLAAD, NAACP, and five Garland Award nominations. Regionally, he was given the Inland Theatre League Award as Ken Talley in "Fifth of July," three awards for direction and performance as Dr. Dysart in "Equus," and he was up for Washington, DC’s Helen Hayes honors as Oscar Wilde in the premiere of "Oscar & Speranza." His first novel "Waiting for Walk," a memoir of growing up as a child actor, has been sitting in a desk drawer since its completion in 2005, proving there is often a deep divide between talent and functionality. www.travismichaelholder.coms
Oct

HEAD OF PASSES

Phylicia Rashad is certainly a force of nature, although the only uncluttered place left for her to explore is littered with Terrell Alvin McCraney's continuous clichés. His newest play is chockfull of good god-fearin' born-again eye-flutterin' and the lifting of palms to the heavens while constantly telling others how to live their lives. Director Tina Landau, however, leads her startlingly gifted ensemble and the no-holds-barred performance of Rashad with amazing grace.

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Oct

Runaway Home

At a critical time when massive storms have devastated Texas, Florida, and now Puerto Rico while that monstrous destroyer of the free world Dotard Donnie assures us his soulless administration's efforts for recovery are going “really, really well,” the world premiere of Jeremy J. Kamps' arresting new play could not possibly be more urgently important.

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Oct

Walking to Buchenwald

Long ago, the term Ugly American was coined to describe rude and entitled American tourists trampling the world in their Bermuda shorts with ankle socks, loud Hawaiian camp shirts, and ever-present fannypacks, leaving a cultureless footprint behind wherever they traveled. But today, the stakes are infinitely higher. Suddenly, Tom Jacobson's newest narratively-challenged play takes on a new national dilemma: what it means to be an American in a time when we are no longer admired in the world but reviled—and sadly but appropriately feared.

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Sep

A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Gynecologic Oncology Unit at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center of New York City,

Some people will obviously be deeply offended by Halley Feiffer's twisted sense of inherited humor, but anyone who has ever faced a long hospital stay or dealt with catastrophic illness personally or caring for a loved one—or if you've worked in a hospital where gallows humor runs rampant to erase the tensions and potential heartache—will enjoy her hilariously dark play with an appreciation and understanding others cannot. And as the civilized world crumples and burns around us, a little bit of Feiffer's off-kilter and wacky yet sophisticated Duck Soupian humor could not be more welcome.

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Sep

THE RED SHOES

The omnipresent raison d'être for this production to have blossomed to fruition is the staging and choreography gifted us by its genius creator, a man who I swear must be part Michel Fokine, part Bob Fosse, a little Mandy Moore, and a lotta just plain Sir Matthew Bourne. No one before him has ever taken the perfection and rigidity of classic ballet and morphed it so successfully with a haunting art deco-angular sensibility and, above all, his signature sense of humor that infuses everything he touches. It's as though sometime in another life, Bourne was movement coach for Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy—that is when not coaching Vaslav Nijinsky himself.

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Sep

Grey Nomad

What makes Dan Lee's painfully old-fashioned sitcom-y script palpable, besides his sharply quirky dialogue and insight into the process of growing older despite ourselves, are these veteran performers able to make it work. This is especially true of Ros Gentle, with whom we fall in love as the curious, frustrated, ever-patient Helen in the first minutes. Every subtly pained expression, every moment of closing her fluttering eyelids to regain her composure, is golden, something that proves even more endearing when Val's more outrageously free behavior begins to rub off on her more infinitely more conservative protégée.

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Sep

EMILIE: LA MARQUISE DU CHATELET DEFENDS HER LIFE TONIGHT

Coeurage Theatre Company's mounting of Lauren Gunderson's intellectually challenging new play is not to be missed, for an introduction to an amazing new playwright, as a nod to this company's commitment to create innovative and thought-provoking theatre at every turn, and for the unearthly and stalwart performance of Sammi Smith in the title role.

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Aug

Arsenic and Old Lace

Whenever Jacque Lynn Colton and Sheelagh Cullen are onstage, their presence is sure to make anyone smile from ear to ear. Explaining to Mortimer their mission to help poor lonely old creatures find their peace is hysterically funny in its abject seriousness, like two aged homicidal Mother Theresas proudly proclaiming all the good they've done and all the lepers they've saved. These two incredible veteran performers often seem to be moving or speaking as one, almost finishing each other's sentences and nodding conspiratorially whenever the other makes a point. Like Jean Adair and Josephine Hull, the original Brewster sisters, their performances are the heart of this production, making it one of the premier theatrical events in a rather parched season.

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Aug

BLACKBIRD

Hard to watch this psychologically traumatizing journey unfold twice in two months but ironically, this second time out proved a fascinating and interesting homage to just how beautifully David Harrower's troubled characters are written. I want to do anything but compare the two productions or two casts but, suffice to say, if you're a student of theatre, the comparison between the two BLACKBIRDs is almost instantly apparent. Even the direction shows two totally different approaches to the same subject. Where Anna Stromberg's kinetic staging had her performers constantly circling each other ominously like caged animals, here Jeremy Ardianne Lelliott takes a far simpler, far more cerebral approach to the material, a choice which makes the ending even more devastating than the other. Both directions, amazingly, work beautifully.

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Aug

Honky Tonk Laundry

Even though they're “cuter than two insects goin' ta' the June Bug Ball in July”—yes, you heard me right—even the infectious talents and incredibly powerful voices of Bets Malone and Misty Cotton can't save this Laundry from puttin' out the CLOSED sign. As wonderful as it always is to hear both of them sing, having only their two voices to listen to, hugely and inexplicably over-amplified overpowering the tiny Hudson's sound system, eventually makes the evening a two-Ibuprofen event. So if you're able to sit through the CMT Awards on TV or Miranda Lambert in concert, by all means head to the Hudson and stomp those feet of yours until they hurt. You probably haven't had so much fun since the pigs et yer little sister.

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Aug

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time

Simon Stephen's adaptation of Mark Haddon's best-selling novel examines, through incredibly imaginative visual devices, the inside of someone's brain living precariously with an unnamed condition falling within the crowded autism spectrum. I am often impressed with the ingenuity, imagination, and determination needed to bring a story like this to fruition as a performance piece, but this five-time Tony winner goes far, far beyond that. This is the stuff that keeps me waking up every morning, switching on the coffee, and facing another day in a world rapidly going to shit around us.

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Aug

THE LOST CHILD

The true elephant in the room chockfull of puzzling and off-the-wall developments is when Angelica admits she is something of a fairy person, living underground with her mystical supernatural guru, if I wasn't too confused and uninterested by then to get it right. There's so much to still explore—and eliminate—here. Rowland's dialogue is beautifully written and the characters are potentially intriguing, but even considering all that and the knockout performance by Addie Daddio that will tear at your heart, little Angelica needs to have Ann sew her shadow back on, put her hands on her hips as she often does and sing a chorus or two of “I Won't Grow Up,” then head back underground just a wee bit longer.

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Jul

Hershey Felder's "Our Great Tchaikovsky"

Hershey Felder returns to LA and, unlike his previous efforts, this time out has a political and social message that elevates it to an even higher status than all the others. As fame and notoriety grew for Piotr Ilyich during the last half of the 19th century, so did his fearful trepidation that he would be exposed as a homosexual. “Nature is not perfect,” Felder as Tchaikovsky prophetically drops, something he then illustrates, bravely energizing the great man's rule-breaking compositions while showing how his proclivities haunted his troubled and unfulfilled personal life. Under the wise directorial hand of his frequent contributor Trevor Hay, Felder presents Tchaikovsky as a sweet but tortured man unable to live the life which was endemic to him and, with extremely evocative expertise, he clearly elucidates this malady with his onstage artistry, arrestingly playing some of the master's most enduringly beautiful compositions with worldclass results.

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Jul

The Devil's Wife

For whatever might be lacking, the Skylight's impressive production values and Tom Jacobson's unique capacity to entertain is not among the considerations. It's actually a kinda perfect choice for a mostly mindless night out of summer fun, something desperately needed as our beloved country spirals down into the crapper around us. If I wasn't such an avid devotee of Jacobson's work and had no previous reference leading to a prevailing sense of disappointment since I probably was expecting so much, I'll bet it would have provided a much better time.

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Jul

Jacques Brel is Alive and Well and Living in Paris

The production serves as proof that the haunting lyricism of Jacques Brel's music and the insightful nature of his evocative, poetic lyrics can make this classic revue survive just about anything--and even eventually inspire director Dan Fishbach's less accomplished, initially less magnetic cast to eventually soar to unexpected heights.

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Jul

HEISENBERG

Simon Stephens has created a unique play from a predictable situation, delicately peeling away the layers of the 40-something Georgie's ditsy dysfunctionality and the 75-year-old Alex' intense emptiness and disappointment with life as their improbable love affair intensifies. Still, a large part of this problem with this production might be the venue itself. The sound at the 739-seat Taper is challenging enough, but when the space is opened to having even more audience on the opposite side while recreating director Mark Brokaw's original staging from the far more intimate Manhattan Theatre Club, the result is problematic. Regardless, Brokaw's staging must have been dazzling in better physical conditions and what Stephens' gives us could easily become a modern classic.

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Jul

Les Blancs

The spectre of playwright Lorraine Hansberry, who tragically died of pancreatic cancer in 1965 at age 34 before this play was finished, permeates this long, long overdue mounting of "Les Blancs," the ultimate masterpiece capping her brief but brilliant career. It is long and gritty and epic, which is surely why it has been so long ignored despite its continuing importance, but Rogue Machine and director Gregg T. Daniel have taken it on in its difficult uncut state and, adding a dynamic cast and brilliant production designs, have simply made it the highlight of the season for LA theatre.

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Jul

The Cake

As the U.S. Supreme Court prepares to take on the case of the Colorado baker who refused to create a wedding cake for a gay couple, Bekah Brunstetter introduces us to a similarly burdened Della (Debra Jo Rupp), a sweetly dutiful god-fearin' housewife who has found fulfilment in her own small storefront baking business. Director Jennifer Chambers' cast is uniformly golden and it's especially glorious to see Rupp onstage playing a darker, naked-er version of Kitty Forman, but the incredibly funny and promising Brunstetter still needs to go back to the drawing board to tie everything up with a bit less episodic television-like ease. As is, The Cake is hilarious, potentially moving, but... well... slightly undercooked.

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Jun

The Pride

Though seemingly simple, under the surface The Pride is a stinging indictment that we, as a species, should live the lives we feel is right for us, without care of what anyone else thinks about our choices. Both in 1958 and 2008, Oliver's world, which should be rewarding him for his essential gentleness and obvious talents, has turned on him, mainly due to what he has been told all his life was right and what was wrong, leading him into sad, ugly, risky behavior. If we choose to live truthfully, with genuine regard for one another and with our heads held high, nobody can tell us who we should be or what bastardized and antiquated religious-based edicts we must follow.

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Jun

Blackbird

To the credit of director Anna Stromberg and her exceptional performers, what this courageously brazen playwright, unfettered by societal mores that might make him a target for our current conservative “leadership,” eventually manages to accomplish is to make us feel a tremendous well of sympathy for both Una and Peter despite the nature of a crime that, in our culture, is considered abhorrent in every regard. What this leaves us wondering, if we're really willing to listen, is how much human behavior, all those things that should be allowed to be decided on a private and individual basis, turns twisted because we are told it is twisted. Do such things destroy lives because they're inherently evil—or is it because our accepted and religiously-spawned heritage demands it must be?

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