Registered Critic: Cynthia Citron

Cynthia Citron has lived and worked on every continent except Antarctica as a journalist, public relations and communications director, a documentary screenwriter and a theater reviewer. She is also a co-founder of Earthwatch, the scientific research expedition company, and served as the editor of Bostonia, the prize-winning alumni magazine of Boston University.
Nov

Elijah

Imagine, if you will, six strong personalities stranded in a
Thank God It's Friday pub while a hurricane rages outside.
The accompanying rain has flooded the streets, and all the
highways in this small Texas town have been closed. The town is so small, in fact, that its most prominent feature is the jail, where a child murderer is about to be put to death on this night.

sweet - ...read full review

Nov

Between Riverside and Crazy

This apartment on Riverside Drive in a relatively classy section of New York's West Side was given to Pops in compensation for having had six bullets pumped into his leg and groin eight years earlier by a white rookie cop. This has left Pops lame, alcoholic, and celibate.

sour - ...read full review

Oct

Sisters In Law

The two actors, who give an absolutely stunning performance under the superb direction of Patricia McGregor, are Tovuh Feldshuh as Ruth and Stephanie Faracy as Sandra. Their performances are enhanced by the exceptional scenic design of Rachel Myers and the projection design of Yee Eun Nam, who keep everything moving swiftly and smoothly by providing moving images in black and white on the screen in the background.

This play is a must-see, especially if you've seen the recent documentaries of the notorious RBG. You'll love seeing her in person, represented by the fabulous and ubiquitous Tovah Feldshuh, and you'll enjoy the relationship and dialog between the two Supremes.

sweet - ...read full review

Sep

DRIVING WILDE

It is called “Driving Wilde” but the only relation it has to Oscar Wilde is that it is playwright Jacqueline Wright’s tedious version of Wilde’s classic “The Picture of Dorian Gray” and the actor who plays the lead is actually called Dorian. And Dorian (Michael Kodi Farrow) at one point expresses the wish, as Wilde’s Dorian did, that he could remain young and beautiful as his portrait becomes old and ugly.

Farrow, who actually is young and beautiful, is represented as a swanning gay man who spends all his time posing seductively and fluttering around orgasmically. And as his personality grows more and more evil, he develops the habit of addressing his conquests lavishly and lovingly one moment and turning vicious and hateful in the next, berating them and insulting them vociferously.

sour - ...read full review

Aug

GOOD MOURNING

Ernest was a boy full of sadness and woe, and, I think you’ll agree, justifiably so.His mother had died, and just as he feared, his father then, literally, just disappeared.Leaving him, at thirteen, all alone, feeling abandoned and on his own.

sweet - ...read full review

Jul

Nancy F***ing Reagan

It’s been nearly 35 years since the beloved film star Rock Hudson died of a heretofore unknown disease called AIDS. At the time, Ronald Reagan, who had been a movie star himself (although not a beloved one) was president. He reacted to news of the malady that was soon to take the lives of a generation of men with indifference and denial. If he had had access to the damning terminology of our current president, he might have dismissed this tragedy as “just a Chinese hoax.”

sweet - ...read full review

Jul

LOVE, MADNESS, AND SOMEWHERE IN BETWEEN

When the actor, James Cox, appears and begins to bellow the story of his life, the audience is riveted for an hour by the range of emotional turmoil he reveals. His father was a brutal drunk who beat and terrorized him through his childhood. And at 11 Jimmy fell in love for the first time with a girl who was indifferent to his hesitant declaration. That same year, while serving as an altar boy, he was “buggered” by the parish priest, Father Chuck, who introduced the activity as “wrestling.” It was a soul-shattering experience for Jimmy, but he still implored Father Chuck to remain his friend.

sour - ...read full review

Jul

Mysterious Circumstances

The play consists of seven actors playing some 26 different characters, as well as “others” too insignificant to identify specifically. And so the stage was a chaos of people coming and going, often dressed in costumes very different from the ones in which they had previously appeared, and delivering their crucial commentary in a variety of nearly impenetrable British accents.

sweet-sour - ...read full review

Jul

Mysterious Circumstances

While “Mysterious Circumstances” may be a little hard to keep up with, it is exceptionally well done, thanks to the intense direction of Matt Shakman and the impeccable work of the extensive cast...

So go! You’ll be transfixed.

sweet - ...read full review

May

The Long Gravel Road

In a bewildering, long-winded, stream of consciousness train of thought peppered with non sequiturs, playwright and actor Abbott Alexander delivers a 90-minute monologue that will leave you noggle-swoggled and mind-boggled, to say the least.

sweet - ...read full review

Mar

FRIENDS WITH GUNS

Shannon and Josh are having dinner with new friends Leah and Danny. Abetted by abundant wine, they declare themselves "best friends" and make a plan to celebrate the upcoming holiday, Thanksgiving, together. The mood changes abruptly, however, when Danny mentions that he has a gun collection locked up in his garage. At that point Josh jumps up and cancels not only the plans for Thanksgiving but the friendship as well. Josh, as it turns out, is violently antipathetic to guns and the people who use them.

sweet-sour - ...read full review

Mar

CATS

The production now playing at the Pantages seemed to go on for weeks, even though the theater pulled out all the stops to make it a “spectacular adventure”. They were Jellico Cats, after all, as they told us at interminable length, but most of their explanations were lost in the turmoil of the over-loud band that banged its way through all the songs. It wasn't until the second act that we became aware that all the soloists had incredibly beautiful voices. But the entire production reached its peak when Grizabella took the stage to sing the song that Barbra Streisand made immortal, “Memory”. Grizabella's rendition was heart-stopping and the audience was transfixed by her amazing voice. When she finished, the audience gave her a ten-minute sitting ovation that stopped the show.

sweet-sour - ...read full review

Mar

Miss America's Ugly Daughter: Bess Myerson & Me

“Miss America's Ugly Daughter” begins when Barra is 27 years old, as she waits for her mother to disembark from a plane from which she has stolen all the blankets. Her mother's greeting is, “You look old!”
It's not hard to understand why Barra “daydreamed about becoming an orphan.”

sweet-sour - ...read full review

Feb

Witness Uganda

A dozen African-American artists begin by blasting out an enthusiastic melodious chant in one of the Ugandan languages, followed by a spirited dance that even Jerome Robbins would envy. All flailing arms and flying legs, accompanied by more chanting.

sweet - ...read full review

Feb

Death House

I have to emphasize, once again, that this play is remarkable for its verbal exchanges and for the way the three magnificent actors bring it to life.  It's a production that ought to be seen by everyone, no matter which side of the death penalty issue they espouse.

sweet - ...read full review

Feb

LINDA VISTA

Wheeler is an unhappy man, drifting through life without direction, without ambition, without compassion, without hope. He is not as great a photographer as the "greats" that he admires and, at 50, he is "too old to be something I'm not." Ian Barford plays Wheeler surrounded by an awesome team of his fellow ensemble members from Chicago's wonderful Steppenwolf Theatre Company, and all of the characters are effectively galvanized by the impeccable direction of Dexter Bullard and the creative scenic design of Todd Rosenthal. But the last word goes to the playwright, Tracy Letts, because he has so many of them. Humorous, humiliating, witty, and grim. But thoroughly engaging.

sweet - ...read full review

Jan

An Inspector Calls

The play is “An Inspector Calls”. Unfortunately, he was calling from another country. And another century. With accents so “teddily British” that the play could have really used subtitles.
An Inspector Calls", in my view, does not warrant being hailed as "the theatrical event of its generation," as it has been, in spite of Director Stephen Daldry's version having won three Oliviers, four Tonys, and seven Drama Desk Awards.
It starts out on a virtually empty stage, much too spacious for the oddly designed house plunked in the middle of it.
The Inspector arrives to question the principals about a young woman who has committed suicide. The two young men, Gerald and Eric, recognize her as a woman they had each slept with (gasp!). Eric, in fact, had impregnated her, and Gerald had stolen money to help her out (gasp! gasp!).
If there are any thrills or chills to be had, as advertised, they turn up at the end of the play, but I wasn't particularly thrilled or chilled.

sour - ...read full review

Jan

Forever Brooklyn

Can you imagine seeing the name "Melvyn Kaplofkis" up in lights on Broadway? Well, neither could he. So he changed it to "Mel King" and became "The King of Brooklyn." Although Danny DiTorrice has charm, a pleasant singing voice, and a legitimate Brooklyn accent, the play is badly misidentified as a "musical comedy". Relabeling it a "coming-of-age drama" would certainly help.

sweet-sour - ...read full review

Jan

LOVE ACTUALLY LIVE

The film is much fun, but the current musical is absolutely sensational! Each of the principals in the film is matched by a doppelganger on stage dressed in outfits similar to the film actors' and they arrive on stage and continue to walk across it just as the film actor reaches the edge of the screen. Moreover, each and every member of this huge cast has an unbelievably beautiful singing voice, which they put to great use singing most of the songs on the original “Love, Actually” soundtrack.

sweet - ...read full review

Jan

Famous

All the factors involved in becoming a leading man add up to his current state of decrepitude, but Dietrick in portraying the older, addled Jason, gives a performance that would certainly win him a Tony if this play were staged in New York.

sweet - ...read full review

ADS
  • Joyfully shedding the invisibility of aging!
  • La Vie En Rose with Julia Migenes

Featured LemonAide