Publicist: Marnie Olson

Jul

HOLLYWOODN'T

A sometimes uncomfortably sad, sometimes bitingly funny and nearly always poignant journey through the sexual landscape of Creeptown – I mean, Hollywood.
Lisa’s stories and her willingness to share so much is the best part about this show. It’s so refreshing to hear a woman talk so boldly about her sexuality without shame while also showing us the seedier side of what it means to be young, beautiful, and hopeful in Hollywood.
Lisa Verlo is very funny – an immensely talented woman.

sweet

Jul

Sexual Misadventures of a Straight White Male: A Privilege Story

Finally! A refreshing perspective from a straight white man taking responsibility for his own role in the ever-evolving feminist landscape.
Ross Gosla. He's funny, sweet, charming, breath-takingly honest and really trying to use his Straight White Man powers for good. He's also very weird, which as far as I'm concerned makes him more accessible, relatable, and frankly - cooler - than the Chads he eerily impersonates.
I enjoyed his not exactly under-the-top German accent as our tour guide to the Man Make Machine, but most of all, I appreciate that he asks himself the hard questions. What is a real man? A real man is one who knows if he's not part of the solution, he's part of the problem.
His dance moves are pretty tight too.
Also, he found himself a woman director, which shows that he gets it more than most men.
Kudos to director Steph Martinez who kept a quick pace and a constantly moving landscape.

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Jul

Leaving Prince Charming

Lara Repko is a gifted performer and storyteller. I loved the framing device of having her fairy godmother narrate for us – a refreshing new take on a solo show. I related to the many voices living in her head and the journey through her darkness as her Prince turns on her is gut-wrenching. Ms. Repko has immense vocal talent – she has more than just a series of funny character voices. Her voice changes in inflection, modulation, timbre and accent – and she executes this nearly flawlessly.
This show rightfully comes with a trigger warning – it is intense, and for anyone who has endured physical or psychological abuse, I say proceed with caution.

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Jul

What I Never Told You

The best part of this is the acting. While all the actors are great, Amy Argyle is breath-taking, heartbreaking and devastating.
I also appreciated some of the more unconventional aspects of the story-telling, which directly engaged the audience.
A truly beautiful piece of theatre.
While I loved the story, I felt that the twist in it was set up to be that - a twist. I can't say more without spoiling it, but I felt like I would have enjoyed it more if I hadn't figured out what the twist would be in the first few minutes of the play.
But maybe we are supposed to know and I misinterpreted that, but either way it made me antsy - wondering when Alysha (the character) would catch on to what seemed obvious.
But overall, What I Never Told You is a deeply moving story of love - and what it means to hold on and to let go.

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Jul

This Way Yonder

A charming script by Montana Cypress, clean and lean direction by Monica Martin and a powerhouse performance by Marjorie Knight.
I loved the story. I saw the Encore in which the writer (Montana Cypress) stepped in to play Cody and I really enjoyed the chemistry between him and Kelly Crossley as Maybelline.
Marjorie Knight’s performance shines especially bright though. Her portrayal of Ruth captured me completely.
The sound and lighting design was also stellar. I’m not sure how much of that was from Director Monica Martin or Stage Manager Hannah McDonald (or perhaps a combined effort), but it was fantastic.

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Jul

FERTILE: A Conversation About the Expectation of Procreation

Heather Dowling is a stand-out performer who transitions seamlessly between characters.
Heather Dowling is a fantastic performer. She's incredibly engaging and commits to each character fully. My favorite character is the old neighbor - absolutely hilarious.
This is challenging subject matter for me to invest in because I've never had even the slightest inkling toward motherhood. So while it's completely out of my grasp of understanding why anyone would put themselves through so much for something I cannot understand wanting in the first place, I go to the theatre to be lifted out of my own experience. And while I relate in no way to the concept of desiring motherhood, Heather took me on a journey that reminded me that it's not about WHAT you want and not getting it so much as it about learning to let go, and let your life unfold as it was meant to. Brava to brave women like Heather telling the hard stories!

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Jun

Goldfish

A slice of life, quite ordinary, made extraordinary by the beautiful script, taut direction and exquisite performances.

I LOVED this play. The script and actors are utterly charming.
John Kolvenbach’s words walk a tightrope between sweetness and cynicism. Particularly cutting and hilarious are the words of Margaret, delivered with a jaded deftness by the riveting Jessica Abrams.
Rich Grosso as Leo will break your heart. Leo was a man I couldn’t help but love in spite of his deeply flawed paternal struggle.
As our young couple in love, Damon McKinnis and Sami Henry are adorable, quirky, and fiercely intelligent with a resilient strength rarely seen (or portrayed onstage) in anyone so young.
Much can be said of Dean Farell Bruggeman’s impeccable direction. Where so many directors choose to clutter the stage with eternal and unneccessary crosses, pacing & get up, sit down, busy work for actors to “keep things moving”, Bruggeman’s tidy direction correctly chose stillness and always honored the long-asked question – “what would this character DO?” Sometimes, the answer is: just sit there. This gave me a sense that not only does Bruggeman trust his actors, he trusts his audience, and so, willingly we go, and sit and cozy up to the warm bubble of Goldfish.

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Jun

Ask A Black Woman

Shanara Sanders is an incredibly engaging performer. Whether she’s re-enacting scenes from her life in funny & sometimes cringe-worthy characterizations, singing in her gorgeous silky voice, or delivering powerful punches of riveting spoken word, you can’t take your eyes or your ears off her for a second.
Her power-walking scene is side-splittingly funny.
If you are Black, you should see this show. But if you are not, you should REALLY see this show. I was moved to tears a number of times, and always working to reign in my emotions – I didn’t want to be “that white woman” – you know the one – the one who has such a visceral emotional response that it starts to feel more about her than about the Black person who rightfully belongs in the spotlight. So I kept it together, but it wasn’t easy. Some of it is very hard to hear and slaps you in the face with “how far we still need to go”, but you will get those feel-good moments too, when you see how far so many have come, and overcome.

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    ADS
    • Imagine the possibilities. All of them.
    • THE ART OF DINING at the Gloria Gifford Conservatory
    • DIRTY TRICKS w/ The New Bad Boys of Magic
    • Masoch and DeSAde at Oh My Ribs! Theater

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