F*CK TINDER: FIVE QUESTIONS FOR DAVID RODWIN AT THE HOLLYWOOD FRINGE


Roger Q Mason

Roger Q Mason

Writer


Writer/performer David Rodwin has returned to Los Angeles to present his new solo show F*ck Tinder during the Hollywood Fringe Festival at Sacred Fools Theatre.

Lauded by the San Francisco Bay Guardian as, “an exceptional, inspiring talent,” Rodwin's show is sure to be one of the toasts of the Fringe this year.  As he prepared for his presentation of F*ck Tinder here in Hollywood, I took some time to ask David a few questions about the work, his development process, and what creative pursuits are next on the horizon for him.

1) So you're back in LA for the Fringe Festival.  Where have you been?  What have you been up to?

I moved to San Francisco a few months after doing my last solo show Total Novice at HFF'14. I moved because my girlfriend broke up with me and an hour later, when I went out for a walk to think about how I was going to have to move out, I got held up at gunpoint. The next day a dear friend in San Francisco called me up and said “I heard about what happened. You need to get out of LA. I need a roommate. Move up." So I did.

2) What's F*ck Tinder all about?

F*ck Tinder is about kinky sex, polyamory, and acid trips. But mostly it's about the crazy we dive into when we enter the world of dating on apps. It's also a love story. The first half is about the first year I spent in San Francisco where I wanted to have fun and get freaky after being in a committed relationship while I was hearing about how people were on this insane new app which I thought was all about  “Free sex. Right now. Often weird.” I found out the weird part was true, but that was more about the people. There was far less se than I was hoping. But those awkward encounters are what make comedy. People are FUNNY. The second half is when I started wanting something more. Something deeper. And that's when I really found the weird. San Francisco weird.

3) This piece isn't your first solo show.  What's your process in creating solo work?

I worked with Spalding Gray for a while years ago and I've inherited his process for storytelling. I have other solo work that is musical in nature, for which I have a very different process. My first three solo shows were one-man, multimedia operas. I used a very different process. But for the last two shows, I used Spalding's style, which is to write an extremely brief outline, a few words to remind you of each sequence (1-5 min). Talk the story out loud with your mouth. Do it again and remember what worked well. Do it in front of an audience. Do it again and again, remembering what you did last time. Finding the words with your mouth.

I don't write the shows down until a show is set which can take dozens of performances. When I do they're just a transcription. That keeps it very lively. I see too many shows where I can tell the performing is reciting words they've memorized. Even when it's their own, it can often feel stale to my ears. The process I use can be terrifying. There's nothing to hold on to. And for me the biggest challenge at Fringe is keeping the shows on time. I could do a 24 hour version of F*ck Tinder tomorrow. In fact, I might do that for Valentine's Day next year. Partially for fun and partially to bring attention to the book of F*ck Tinder which will be released then, but you can get online one chapter at a time, in serialized form through Patreon starting June 8. Sign up for it here: https://www.f-tinder.com/book

4) Has Tinder ruined the art of courtship?

When was there an art of courtship?

Seriously though, I've been awkward around girls my entire life. I actually have an entire section in my book F*ck Tinder about the genesis of that. Sadly the live show is only an hour and I can't fit it in. Suffice to say it revolves around the prettiest girl in 5th grade making fun of me in a fictionalized story she wrote about me being a mad scientist that the teacher thought was so great she decided to share it with the whole class.

But in terms of courtship, the biggest thing today is that all rules have been thrown out the window. Especially in San Francisco. No one knows what the other is hoping for or expecting. One person's idea of courtship can be a huge turn off to someone else. I ruined a perfectly good fuckbuddy once when I told her “I like you,” that was too much commitment for her. Personally, I like to like the people I have sex with. Not her. Also, I was disabused of the notion that women in San Francisco wants to be monogamous, much less get married and have kids. In two years meeting people in real life and online, I haven't met one. Out of 120 women I dated.

I think that's peculiar to San Francisco, but the non-monogamy movement has been taking hold around the country. I wish it had when I was younger. But again, the problem of courtship is expectations. And even on Tinder, which was invented as the “Straight man's Grinder,” now many people post NOT HERE FOR HOOK-UPS. But sometimes the ones who say that in all caps are doing it because they were there for just that last week. And they don't always mean what they say, which is a real problem in a world where I demand not just affirmative consent, but enthusiastic consent. Even if I'm at a sex club.

5) What's next?

I'm directing and starring in a feature film of my last one man show Total Novice. I may eventually go back to the original title “Crackwhore Pornstar Love,” but while I'm raising the funds, I'm sticking with Total Novice. Want to invest in a movie? Check out the teaser at: www.jadelake.com

Roger Q Mason
Roger Q. Mason is a writer whose work gives voice to the silenced. A recurring theme in his writing is the intersection of race, history, and memory.

Mason’s plays include Orange Woman: A Ballad for a Moor; Onion Creek; and The Duat. Mason's works have been seen at such venues as McCarter Theatre Center, Ensemble Studio Theatre/LA; Son of Semele Theatre; Teatro Vista at Victory Gardens; and Chicago Dramatists. He is an Activate: Midwest New Play Festival finalist, New York Theatre Innovator’s Award nominee, and the winner of the 2014 Hollywood Fringe Festival Encore Producer's Award. Mason holds an BA in English and Theatre from Princeton University, an MA in English from Middlebury College, and an MFA in Writing for the Screen and Stage from Northwestern University.

Mason has received commissions from Steep Theatre and Chimera Ensemble in Chicago, as well as the Obie-winning Fire This Time Festival.

For more on Roger Q. Mason, visit www.rogerqmason.com