100 Aprils

Critics

LemonMeter

72 %

Reviews: 9

Audience

LemonMeter

Reviews: 0

"TOP TEN" - Stage Raw

“I love playwright Leslie Ayvazian's use of language. Michael Arabian (Director) gets the style of the piece exactly right…she gets at something I haven't seen explored before” – Stage and Cinema

Winner of the 2017 Ovation Award for “Best Season,” and two time recipient of the Los Angeles Drama Critics Circle “Polly Warfield Award for an Excellent Season in a Small to Mid-Size Theatre,” Rogue Machine presents a stunning new play to run through July 23rd.

100 APRILS is a darkly comic look at the generational consequences, and insanity, of history denied. John Saypian is a modern-day Don Quixote. He and his family are second generation Armenians whose parents escaped the Genocide. John believes that a tormentor is pursuing him. Is the enemy a haunted memory from his childhood or is he real?

“A well-paced, well-acted staging. The action is set in 1982, a time frame that gives the atrocities - and John's memories of his older relatives' first person accounts of barbarism - a harrowing immediacy, especially in John's mind” - LA Times

Universal in scope, 100 Aprils mines the seeds of hope from a truth that must be told.

“I felt that I needed to contribute something to honor, and coincide with, the centennial commemoration of the Armenian genocide,” says playwright Leslie Ayvazian. “It is a story that all Armenians carry, and tell throughout generations. This particular telling comes from an absurdist world. It lives partially in hallucination and partially in dreams that cannot be silenced.”

100 APRILS runs Saturdays and Mondays at 8:30pm, Sundays at 3:00pm through July 23, 2018. Rogue Machine is located in The Met, 1089 N Oxford Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90029. Tickets are $40. Reservations: 855-585-5185 or at www.roguemachinetheatre.com

Reviews

Avatar

Some stories can cut to the chase so quickly that they know to tell "lightning in a bottle" moments of time. "100 Aprils" is set in such a continuous moment of a psychiatric ward, told in real life. Yet stories of that ilk deserve clearer substance. Ayvazian's play recalls an experimental structure not unlike Luis Buñuel. In its characters, in its structure, in its narrative, there's an unnerving message that has a germ of potential in its ambiguity. But if only we could figure it out easier.

sweet-sour - Victor Kong - Discover Hollywood - ...read full review


David MacDowell Blue - Night Tinted Glasses

Almost surprisingly, this never becomes a polemic about the Genocide, or even about evil per se. Rather, we get a slice of life about what evil can do to those touched even second or third hand. In the process, though, we see more about those touched than about the evil itself. Maybe that makes for a moral if you like, or a lesson, or maybe just a possibility this audience member found compelling.

sweet - David MacDowell Blue - Night Tinted Glasses - ...read full review


Avatar

After watching the play, the setting seems to tell the story of the genocide by universalizing it. It feels emotionally-driven, enabling the entire audience to resonate with what's right in front of them.

sweet - Lori Sinanian - Armenian Weekly - ...read full review


Elaine L. Mura - LA Splash

A powerful, intimate look at the effects of violence on a people….how real people respond to life's twists and turns. 100 APRILS raises many issues worthy of serious discussion. Portrayed with compassion and honesty...Flynn achieves a moving portrayal of a man living between two worlds...and getting ready to leave both of them.

sweet - Elaine Mura - Splash Magazine - ...read full review


Deborah Klugman

The play has disconcerting tonal shifts as well. But Brian Gale's accomplished lighting adds notable texture to the story, which takes a strange twist as it pursues its expression of what happens when people's sense of justice is denied.

sweet-sour - Deborah Klugman - StageRaw - ...read full review


Avatar

This play, may be brilliant in its attempt to make a strong polemic statement bringing more to light the notion that we are all victims in one way or another.

sweet - Michael Sheehan - On Stage LA - ...read full review


Avatar

Michael Arabian gets the style of the piece exactly right. Memories may be literal, but also flexible, hazy, and haphazard. There is a purposely tedious joke that is referred to a couple of times before becoming a rather touching end piece. It involves anthropomorphic pots and has a punch line that is apparently uproarious if you are from the Old Country, and impenetrable if you are not. Humor can be generational and culturally specific. Just like pain.

sweet - Samuel Garza Bernstein - Stage and Cinema - ...read full review


Avatar

There's certainly the germ of a geopolitically relevant play here. There are also the makings for a plangent absurdist comedy. Unfortunately, “Aprils” falls precipitously into the divide between surrealism and political didacticism. Not knowing how to react or what to think, we remain at a troubling emotional disconnect throughout Ayvazian's well-intentioned but failed experiment.

sour - Kathleen Foley - LA Times - ...read full review


Steven Stanley

Though too much of a polemic to fully hit the mark, 100 Aprils is worth seeing if for no other reason than the light it shines on a holocaust second only to The Holocaust in modern times.

sweet-sour - Steven Stanley - Stage Scene LA - ...read full review


Avatar

Some stories can cut to the chase so quickly that they know to tell "lightning in a bottle" moments of time. "100 Aprils" is set in such a continuous moment of a psychiatric ward, told in real life. Yet stories of that ilk deserve clearer substance. Ayvazian's play recalls an experimental structure not unlike Luis Buñuel. In its characters, in its structure, in its narrative, there's an unnerving message that has a germ of potential in its ambiguity. But if only we could figure it out easier.

sweet-sour - Victor Kong - Discover Hollywood - ...read full review


David MacDowell Blue - Night Tinted Glasses

Almost surprisingly, this never becomes a polemic about the Genocide, or even about evil per se. Rather, we get a slice of life about what evil can do to those touched even second or third hand. In the process, though, we see more about those touched than about the evil itself. Maybe that makes for a moral if you like, or a lesson, or maybe just a possibility this audience member found compelling.

sweet - David MacDowell Blue - Night Tinted Glasses - ...read full review


Avatar

After watching the play, the setting seems to tell the story of the genocide by universalizing it. It feels emotionally-driven, enabling the entire audience to resonate with what's right in front of them.

sweet - Lori Sinanian - Armenian Weekly - ...read full review


Elaine L. Mura - LA Splash

A powerful, intimate look at the effects of violence on a people….how real people respond to life's twists and turns. 100 APRILS raises many issues worthy of serious discussion. Portrayed with compassion and honesty...Flynn achieves a moving portrayal of a man living between two worlds...and getting ready to leave both of them.

sweet - Elaine Mura - Splash Magazine - ...read full review


Deborah Klugman

The play has disconcerting tonal shifts as well. But Brian Gale's accomplished lighting adds notable texture to the story, which takes a strange twist as it pursues its expression of what happens when people's sense of justice is denied.

sweet-sour - Deborah Klugman - StageRaw - ...read full review


Avatar

This play, may be brilliant in its attempt to make a strong polemic statement bringing more to light the notion that we are all victims in one way or another.

sweet - Michael Sheehan - On Stage LA - ...read full review


Avatar

Michael Arabian gets the style of the piece exactly right. Memories may be literal, but also flexible, hazy, and haphazard. There is a purposely tedious joke that is referred to a couple of times before becoming a rather touching end piece. It involves anthropomorphic pots and has a punch line that is apparently uproarious if you are from the Old Country, and impenetrable if you are not. Humor can be generational and culturally specific. Just like pain.

sweet - Samuel Garza Bernstein - Stage and Cinema - ...read full review


Avatar

There's certainly the germ of a geopolitically relevant play here. There are also the makings for a plangent absurdist comedy. Unfortunately, “Aprils” falls precipitously into the divide between surrealism and political didacticism. Not knowing how to react or what to think, we remain at a troubling emotional disconnect throughout Ayvazian's well-intentioned but failed experiment.

sour - Kathleen Foley - LA Times - ...read full review


Steven Stanley

Though too much of a polemic to fully hit the mark, 100 Aprils is worth seeing if for no other reason than the light it shines on a holocaust second only to The Holocaust in modern times.

sweet-sour - Steven Stanley - Stage Scene LA - ...read full review