A Beast/A Burden

Critics

LemonMeter

Reviews: 1

Audience

LemonMeter

Reviews: 2

Before Chris Burden became known to millions with his “Urban Lights” and “Metropolis II” exhibits at LACMA, he spent his early years as the most controversial and subversive performance artist in the United States, putting himself and others in uncomfortable and sometimes dangerous situations for his art. “A Beast/A Burden” covers five incredible and influential months in the life of the young artist (October 1971-February 1972) as he forms the basis for his ever-present mythic stature in the art world. With Burden himself as the meandering and sometimes unreliable narrator, the show evaluates the nature and purpose of art, the place of ‘self' in an artist's work, and the way creatives evolve over time into who they're meant to become.

Reviews

The script by Brewton is solid, as is his direction. Hethcoat and Deshaw are both exceptional in their depiction of a young couple being torn apart by the creative drive that fuels, only one of them.

sweet - Ernest Kearney - www.thetvolution.com - ...read full review


A compelling behind the scenes glimpse of a performance artist. This made me want to go out and learn more about Chris Burden. I loved how they showed how the close relationships around the artist were affected as his art became more provocative. I loved how they showed Chris's sense of humor as his pieces became more and more dangerous. I also loved the shifting perspectives in how different characters remembered and reacted to some of the events.

sweet - Jake Kornely


WHAT I LIKED A Beast/A Burden gives you a glimpse in the crazy and unorthodox artist Chris Burden from the opening scene when he's attempting at breathing oxygen while submerging his head into a bowl of water to getting shot to having the audience write on his body. Now I want to know more about the artist and the reasons behind his obsession with doing the weirdest stunts to cause a reaction to the spectators. The one word that popped in my head as I grabbed that sharpee to write on the bare artist was “free” and I'm still wondering why. WHAT I DIDN'T LIKE Some scenes were blocked from my view since I sat on the first row and two actors stood in front of me. Maybe stand where no audience's view will be blocked. MY OVERALL IMPRESSION What is art? That's the question that Chris Burden (played by an engaging and powerhouse Ben Hethcoat) asks the audience after having witnessed some of his stunts or pieces that makes you question: is this art?

sweet - Victor Sotomayor


The script by Brewton is solid, as is his direction. Hethcoat and Deshaw are both exceptional in their depiction of a young couple being torn apart by the creative drive that fuels, only one of them.

sweet - Ernest Kearney - www.thetvolution.com - ...read full review


A compelling behind the scenes glimpse of a performance artist. This made me want to go out and learn more about Chris Burden. I loved how they showed how the close relationships around the artist were affected as his art became more provocative. I loved how they showed Chris's sense of humor as his pieces became more and more dangerous. I also loved the shifting perspectives in how different characters remembered and reacted to some of the events.

sweet - Jake Kornely


WHAT I LIKED A Beast/A Burden gives you a glimpse in the crazy and unorthodox artist Chris Burden from the opening scene when he's attempting at breathing oxygen while submerging his head into a bowl of water to getting shot to having the audience write on his body. Now I want to know more about the artist and the reasons behind his obsession with doing the weirdest stunts to cause a reaction to the spectators. The one word that popped in my head as I grabbed that sharpee to write on the bare artist was “free” and I'm still wondering why. WHAT I DIDN'T LIKE Some scenes were blocked from my view since I sat on the first row and two actors stood in front of me. Maybe stand where no audience's view will be blocked. MY OVERALL IMPRESSION What is art? That's the question that Chris Burden (played by an engaging and powerhouse Ben Hethcoat) asks the audience after having witnessed some of his stunts or pieces that makes you question: is this art?

sweet - Victor Sotomayor