ALL MY SONS

Critics

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Reviews: 6

Audience

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Reviews: 1

"TOP TEN" - Stage Raw (Recommended)

Winner of multiple Tony Awards and the New York Drama Critics Circle Award for Best New Play, this electrifying family drama ALL MY SONS, by Arthur Miller, remains as timely as it is timeless. A gripping American classic reveals the lethal consequences of deceit and greed. In the aftermath of WWII, Joe Keller and his family struggle to stay intact while planning for their future as a long-hidden secret begins to tear them apart—forcing a reckoning with truth, guilt, and repentance.

“True, real, heart-pounding emotion. Director Gary Lee Reed and the Wasatch Theatrical Ventures (WTV) have done a wonderful job in bringing a classic to a small stage...while keeping the integrity of the writing and the style. This is a talented cast” Broadway World

Arthur Miller is considered to be one of the greatest playwrights of the 20th century. The recipient of 8 TONY awards, including the TONY for Lifetime Achievement, his best known works include Death of a Salesman (Tony Award – Best Play; Pulitzer Prize – Drama), The Crucible (Tony Award – Best Play), A View From the Bridge, The Price, and After the Fall.

Director Gary Lee Reed, the cast includes Mark Belnick, Francesca Casale, Bill Doyle, James McAndrew, Maddie McCormick, Jessica Moreno, Alexis Boozer Sterling, Michael William Thompson, Jack Tynan, and Beckett Wilder.

ALL MY SONS runs 8pm on Friday and Saturdays, 3pm on Sundays through May 12, 2019. The Lounge Theatre is located at 6201 Santa Monica Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90038, with ample street parking. Tickets are $30. Reservations: (323) 960-5770 or online https://www.onstage411.com/sons

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Reviews

"Ably directed by Gary Lee Reed and produced by Racquel Lehrman this production of All My Sons is a fluid, riveting drama that draws you in and doesn’t let go. "

sweet - Peter Foldy - Hollywood Revealed - ...read full review


"I was really let down by this. Where to start... Costumes The whole play takes place in one day. The character of Annie wears three different dresses in that one day. And the first time she came out I thought she had a hearing aid falling off her ear, but it was just the weird earrings. And she had a different pair of weird earrings later on. And the dad's pants just didn't fit. They looked dumb. Chris wore black dress pants in the first scene. In the morning. Who wears black dress pants on a Saturday morning? I've seen other plays that the costume designer has worked on, and I liked them, but this was weird. And why was Chris wearing so much jewelry? A necklace and a bracelet? That doesn't seem right. Set A really cool vinyl wrap was used to cover the brick interior of the space. It had trees and a couple clouds. Which was neat, except there's a line that says there's not a cloud in the sky, and someone mentions poplars, except none of the trees were poplars. The tree that falls down was really small, and there's a line that says there's more sun in the backyard now that the tree has fallen. Didn't make sense. The house shook when the screen door shut. Couldn't someone just attach the set to the wall? And the fence was all dog-eared slats, except for one that was dead center. It was off and obvious and showed poor attention to detail. But it was a good option to deal with the entrances and exits from a limited number of doors. Except some actors just walked on from behind the fence, and some popped their head up over the gate like a comedy routine. On the issue of details, the backyard furniture was horrible. It looked like rehearsal furniture. There was one adirondack chair painted white, an stained side table made of 2x4s next to it, a worn untreated bench downstage, and another untreated bench made of 2x4s upstage. It was a mishmash of furniture that didn't belong together, or in the back yard of a well-to-do business man. The porch only had a screen door that led into the house. No storm door. The decoration on the porch and inside the house was kitchy Americana bits that I doubt anyone in the time would have actually used. A Coca Cola sign and a magazine cover? It just looked like stuff from a yard sale today, rather than being a part of that family. As soon as I walked into the theatre lobby, I smelled something that made me think they had a problem with the building's sewer line. But it was actually mulch that they spread around the set. Horrible idea. Lighting As some point Chris and Annie were put in a red/purple light. To obviously symbolize their love? It seemed very high school quality. Acting The actor playing Joe, the dad, (who also runs the company that produced the show) was the worst. Hands down. And in looking up info for this review, I found online other reviews of him doing the play about nine years ago, and all the reviews said he was the worst back then as well. He didn't seem to be listening, or be affected by anyone. He was stiff and had a few line flubs, which is really unacceptable, especially if he's already played the part before. The neighbor lady seemed to be doing a clown show. The mom was just kind of crazy, we could see here scheming. Chris was good early on, but his emotional breakdown in the third act was just ... odd. The gal playing Annie was awesome, the shining light of the whole show. Direction What was up with the dance number at the beginning? There was some interpretive dance number that had the mom falling into the tree and knocking it over. But then a couple times in the play they say the wind blew it over, but we in the audience all saw her dance her way into it. Why? Why add a scene to this play? Summation A few years back, Actors Equity made a shift to make it harder for 99 seat theatres to do shows. This is one that should have fallen by the wayside. It just seems like a vanity project for the main actor. Does LA need more of these shows?"

sour - Jason Masterson


"Working with Miller's superb script, director Gary Lee Reed helms a brilliant production which does not for a moment appear to be dated or out-of-sync with today's values. The four leading actors (the Keller trio and Annie) portray each character with vivid intensity and virtuoso skill. Scenic designer Pete Hickok has outdone himself with an intimate set which amply reflects these pivotal hours in everyone's life. Derrick McDaniel's lighting, David B. Marling's sound, and Shon LeBlanc's costumes fill the bill with panache. ALL MY SONS is a must-see production which reveals yet again the consummate skill of playwright Arthur Miller. And, besides that, it's entertaining in its own special and tragic way."

sweet - Elaine L. Mura - LA Splash - ...read full review


"Miller knows how to turn it up and out with dramatic flair. He does it with a steady ease. What appears to be rushed is disguised in a gentle, subtle reveal making it cringe-worthy to watch. It's like a crash on the 405 freeway in Los Angeles, you don't want to watch it but you can't help yourself."

sweet - Mary Montoro - All About the Stage - ...read full review


"In a world in which lying to get ahead has become the norm, especially in our political climate, All My Sons remains strikingly relevant. - RECOMMENDED"

sweet - Julyza Commodore - Stage Raw - ...read full review


"The play succeeds as a reminder of our struggle against history's repetitive nature, and as a warning to stay true to oneself in times of trouble and deception. - RECOMMENDED "

sweet - Lara J. Altunian - Stage Raw - ...read full review


"...all my respect to all the actors braving the stage here and committing to such intricate work. As the play develops, the performers are able to capture Miller's cynicism towards American society. It was nice to see them perform to a practically full house."

sweet - Patricia Garcia - Discover Hollywood - ...read full review


"Ably directed by Gary Lee Reed and produced by Racquel Lehrman this production of All My Sons is a fluid, riveting drama that draws you in and doesn’t let go. "

sweet - Peter Foldy - Hollywood Revealed - ...read full review


"Working with Miller's superb script, director Gary Lee Reed helms a brilliant production which does not for a moment appear to be dated or out-of-sync with today's values. The four leading actors (the Keller trio and Annie) portray each character with vivid intensity and virtuoso skill. Scenic designer Pete Hickok has outdone himself with an intimate set which amply reflects these pivotal hours in everyone's life. Derrick McDaniel's lighting, David B. Marling's sound, and Shon LeBlanc's costumes fill the bill with panache. ALL MY SONS is a must-see production which reveals yet again the consummate skill of playwright Arthur Miller. And, besides that, it's entertaining in its own special and tragic way."

sweet - Elaine L. Mura - LA Splash - ...read full review


"Miller knows how to turn it up and out with dramatic flair. He does it with a steady ease. What appears to be rushed is disguised in a gentle, subtle reveal making it cringe-worthy to watch. It's like a crash on the 405 freeway in Los Angeles, you don't want to watch it but you can't help yourself."

sweet - Mary Montoro - All About the Stage - ...read full review


"In a world in which lying to get ahead has become the norm, especially in our political climate, All My Sons remains strikingly relevant. - RECOMMENDED"

sweet - Julyza Commodore - Stage Raw - ...read full review


"The play succeeds as a reminder of our struggle against history's repetitive nature, and as a warning to stay true to oneself in times of trouble and deception. - RECOMMENDED "

sweet - Lara J. Altunian - Stage Raw - ...read full review


"...all my respect to all the actors braving the stage here and committing to such intricate work. As the play develops, the performers are able to capture Miller's cynicism towards American society. It was nice to see them perform to a practically full house."

sweet - Patricia Garcia - Discover Hollywood - ...read full review


"I was really let down by this. Where to start... Costumes The whole play takes place in one day. The character of Annie wears three different dresses in that one day. And the first time she came out I thought she had a hearing aid falling off her ear, but it was just the weird earrings. And she had a different pair of weird earrings later on. And the dad's pants just didn't fit. They looked dumb. Chris wore black dress pants in the first scene. In the morning. Who wears black dress pants on a Saturday morning? I've seen other plays that the costume designer has worked on, and I liked them, but this was weird. And why was Chris wearing so much jewelry? A necklace and a bracelet? That doesn't seem right. Set A really cool vinyl wrap was used to cover the brick interior of the space. It had trees and a couple clouds. Which was neat, except there's a line that says there's not a cloud in the sky, and someone mentions poplars, except none of the trees were poplars. The tree that falls down was really small, and there's a line that says there's more sun in the backyard now that the tree has fallen. Didn't make sense. The house shook when the screen door shut. Couldn't someone just attach the set to the wall? And the fence was all dog-eared slats, except for one that was dead center. It was off and obvious and showed poor attention to detail. But it was a good option to deal with the entrances and exits from a limited number of doors. Except some actors just walked on from behind the fence, and some popped their head up over the gate like a comedy routine. On the issue of details, the backyard furniture was horrible. It looked like rehearsal furniture. There was one adirondack chair painted white, an stained side table made of 2x4s next to it, a worn untreated bench downstage, and another untreated bench made of 2x4s upstage. It was a mishmash of furniture that didn't belong together, or in the back yard of a well-to-do business man. The porch only had a screen door that led into the house. No storm door. The decoration on the porch and inside the house was kitchy Americana bits that I doubt anyone in the time would have actually used. A Coca Cola sign and a magazine cover? It just looked like stuff from a yard sale today, rather than being a part of that family. As soon as I walked into the theatre lobby, I smelled something that made me think they had a problem with the building's sewer line. But it was actually mulch that they spread around the set. Horrible idea. Lighting As some point Chris and Annie were put in a red/purple light. To obviously symbolize their love? It seemed very high school quality. Acting The actor playing Joe, the dad, (who also runs the company that produced the show) was the worst. Hands down. And in looking up info for this review, I found online other reviews of him doing the play about nine years ago, and all the reviews said he was the worst back then as well. He didn't seem to be listening, or be affected by anyone. He was stiff and had a few line flubs, which is really unacceptable, especially if he's already played the part before. The neighbor lady seemed to be doing a clown show. The mom was just kind of crazy, we could see here scheming. Chris was good early on, but his emotional breakdown in the third act was just ... odd. The gal playing Annie was awesome, the shining light of the whole show. Direction What was up with the dance number at the beginning? There was some interpretive dance number that had the mom falling into the tree and knocking it over. But then a couple times in the play they say the wind blew it over, but we in the audience all saw her dance her way into it. Why? Why add a scene to this play? Summation A few years back, Actors Equity made a shift to make it harder for 99 seat theatres to do shows. This is one that should have fallen by the wayside. It just seems like a vanity project for the main actor. Does LA need more of these shows?"

sour - Jason Masterson