And Now It's All This!

Critics

LemonMeter

Reviews: 2

Audience

LemonMeter

100 %

Reviews: 5

A play about when John Lennon said the Beatles were bigger than Jesus and the fallout that ensued.

Reviews

Avatar

The ‘all this’ carries a lot more weight today than it did then for it now feels as though things are constantly being taken out of context, often on purpose, and then spun around to mean something much bigger or darker or insulting than was originally intended.  It would be fascinating to see where Mr. Boelter’s complete play takes us next.

sweet - Christine Deitner - The Theatre Times - ...read full review


Avatar

A crisp, simply presented piece with dynamic performers. David Foy Bauer embodies John Lennon perfectly. Spencer Cantrell brings nuance to everything he’s ever done and this is no exception. Maureen Cleave woos us with her subtle charm.

This is a great teaser for the full length play to come.

sweet - Jim Blanchette


Avatar

This is what the Fringe is for!

This look at one moment in the young life of John Lennon, one whose repercussions extended through his solo years and death, is a unique and marvelous piece, beautifully written, directed, and performed. For even the casual Beatles fan, it’s a great education into a now-mostly-forgotten disaster that nearly ended the group; and for those with the knowledge of it, it serves up a brilliant look into the psychology of this tormented, egotistical, genius far too young for all he was experiencing.

While all the acting is excellent, of course special kudos must be passed to David Foy Bauer for his nearly alchemic characterization of Lennon, capturing him vocally and physically, but more so the mix of arrogance and confusion the man lived at that time.

Meanwhile, Stephanie Greer as journalist Maureen Cleave and Spencer Cantrell as manager Brian Epstein bring color, depth, and deep understanding to their characters, bringing us all into the frustration of dealing with such an irresistible pain as Lennon is known to have been.

Matt Duggan’s direction is simple, elegant, and unobtrusive, appropriately leaving the telling of the story to the excellent actors – with the one exception of filling the pre-and post-show soundtrack with music of the day other than by the mop-tops we keep hearing about.

But top honors must go to Trevor Boelter’s brilliant, funny, painful, and incisive script, which manages to both take us into the tortured mind and soul of one celebrity, and speak to our present day difficulties with media and egotistical rabble-rousers.

For its short length, this play is likely unimprovable. But it leaves the audience hopeful that Boelter finds a way to expand it into a full-length work that digs yet deeper into the issues, and the man, he clearly understands so well.

sweet - Doug


Avatar

I absolutely loved this show. The writing was great, witty and compelling. Was fascinating to see the events leading up to such a pivotal moment in John Lennon's life. The casting was fantastic. Especially John Lennon. His delivery was perfect. I didn't feel like it was an actor trying to act like John Lennon. I believed it was him. I laughed a lot more than I thought I would. A lot of clever lines delivered perfectly. Not a single joke fell flat.

sweet - Chapen Hayslett


Avatar

It's like having John Lennon in your living room. Impeccably researched and well written historical pieces are rare but all have one thing in common, we know how they're going to end. The trick is in engaging the audience early and pulling them into that delicious time warp which writer Trevor Boelter does with aplomb. The story revolves (or should I say Revolvers) around the infamous "we're more popular than Jesus now" quote which was taken out of context and blown up by the media and subsequently the American religious right. Matt Dugan's direction serves the script well with some smart blocking which underscores the play's pivots. The actors could stand to do a bit of emotional deepening but the play as it stands is quite entertaining and sails along quite well. Is that you John? David Foy Bauer's resemblance to Lennon is uncanny and seems to play him with ease. Stephanie Greer's portrayal of reporter Maureen Cleeve is icy hot, while Spencer Cantrell's depiction of a frazzled Brian Epstein is on point. Boelter himself does a cameo as Reverend Delux, a fiery preacher who epitomizes the Bible Belters (Boelters) of the mid 1960's. A+.

sweet - Kelly Nelson


Avatar

And Now It’s All This is sharp and insightful as it sheds light on the scandal that is now a part of Beatles history .

Put this one on your “must see” list for this year’s Fringe.

sweet - Peter Foldy - Hollywood Revealed - ...read full review


Avatar

I attended the preview for this show and I was so impressed. This is an excellent, excellent production. The cast is phenomenal; their connection and the ease with which they breath life into their characters and this story is just terrific. The actor who plays John Lennon transported me away; I truly felt I was privy to this famous Beatles' private life. And the other characters match his performance: Maureen Cleave is stunning and Brian Epstein most excellent. That poor guy is so stressed he's a heart attack waiting to happen. The cast is all British which lends a deeper authenticity to this very particular moment in John Lennon's life. And that leads me to the writing, it is so lyrical and effortless. Honestly, I think the playwright has just scratched the surface with the potential of his story. His note in the program says that this is the 2nd act of a 3 act play; I cannot wait to see the rest of it because I think he has a hit on his hands. I give kudos to the direction as well, the director pulled out incredible moments of truth in these actors. The Reverend was a highlight; what a total wackjob and you know that kind of a maniac exists. I highly, highly recommend this show. You will not be disappointed. I plan to attend the closing night.

sweet - Henry Salloway


Avatar

The ‘all this’ carries a lot more weight today than it did then for it now feels as though things are constantly being taken out of context, often on purpose, and then spun around to mean something much bigger or darker or insulting than was originally intended.  It would be fascinating to see where Mr. Boelter’s complete play takes us next.

sweet - Christine Deitner - The Theatre Times - ...read full review


Avatar

And Now It’s All This is sharp and insightful as it sheds light on the scandal that is now a part of Beatles history .

Put this one on your “must see” list for this year’s Fringe.

sweet - Peter Foldy - Hollywood Revealed - ...read full review


Avatar

A crisp, simply presented piece with dynamic performers. David Foy Bauer embodies John Lennon perfectly. Spencer Cantrell brings nuance to everything he’s ever done and this is no exception. Maureen Cleave woos us with her subtle charm.

This is a great teaser for the full length play to come.

sweet - Jim Blanchette


Avatar

This is what the Fringe is for!

This look at one moment in the young life of John Lennon, one whose repercussions extended through his solo years and death, is a unique and marvelous piece, beautifully written, directed, and performed. For even the casual Beatles fan, it’s a great education into a now-mostly-forgotten disaster that nearly ended the group; and for those with the knowledge of it, it serves up a brilliant look into the psychology of this tormented, egotistical, genius far too young for all he was experiencing.

While all the acting is excellent, of course special kudos must be passed to David Foy Bauer for his nearly alchemic characterization of Lennon, capturing him vocally and physically, but more so the mix of arrogance and confusion the man lived at that time.

Meanwhile, Stephanie Greer as journalist Maureen Cleave and Spencer Cantrell as manager Brian Epstein bring color, depth, and deep understanding to their characters, bringing us all into the frustration of dealing with such an irresistible pain as Lennon is known to have been.

Matt Duggan’s direction is simple, elegant, and unobtrusive, appropriately leaving the telling of the story to the excellent actors – with the one exception of filling the pre-and post-show soundtrack with music of the day other than by the mop-tops we keep hearing about.

But top honors must go to Trevor Boelter’s brilliant, funny, painful, and incisive script, which manages to both take us into the tortured mind and soul of one celebrity, and speak to our present day difficulties with media and egotistical rabble-rousers.

For its short length, this play is likely unimprovable. But it leaves the audience hopeful that Boelter finds a way to expand it into a full-length work that digs yet deeper into the issues, and the man, he clearly understands so well.

sweet - Doug


Avatar

I absolutely loved this show. The writing was great, witty and compelling. Was fascinating to see the events leading up to such a pivotal moment in John Lennon's life. The casting was fantastic. Especially John Lennon. His delivery was perfect. I didn't feel like it was an actor trying to act like John Lennon. I believed it was him. I laughed a lot more than I thought I would. A lot of clever lines delivered perfectly. Not a single joke fell flat.

sweet - Chapen Hayslett


Avatar

It's like having John Lennon in your living room. Impeccably researched and well written historical pieces are rare but all have one thing in common, we know how they're going to end. The trick is in engaging the audience early and pulling them into that delicious time warp which writer Trevor Boelter does with aplomb. The story revolves (or should I say Revolvers) around the infamous "we're more popular than Jesus now" quote which was taken out of context and blown up by the media and subsequently the American religious right. Matt Dugan's direction serves the script well with some smart blocking which underscores the play's pivots. The actors could stand to do a bit of emotional deepening but the play as it stands is quite entertaining and sails along quite well. Is that you John? David Foy Bauer's resemblance to Lennon is uncanny and seems to play him with ease. Stephanie Greer's portrayal of reporter Maureen Cleeve is icy hot, while Spencer Cantrell's depiction of a frazzled Brian Epstein is on point. Boelter himself does a cameo as Reverend Delux, a fiery preacher who epitomizes the Bible Belters (Boelters) of the mid 1960's. A+.

sweet - Kelly Nelson


Avatar

I attended the preview for this show and I was so impressed. This is an excellent, excellent production. The cast is phenomenal; their connection and the ease with which they breath life into their characters and this story is just terrific. The actor who plays John Lennon transported me away; I truly felt I was privy to this famous Beatles' private life. And the other characters match his performance: Maureen Cleave is stunning and Brian Epstein most excellent. That poor guy is so stressed he's a heart attack waiting to happen. The cast is all British which lends a deeper authenticity to this very particular moment in John Lennon's life. And that leads me to the writing, it is so lyrical and effortless. Honestly, I think the playwright has just scratched the surface with the potential of his story. His note in the program says that this is the 2nd act of a 3 act play; I cannot wait to see the rest of it because I think he has a hit on his hands. I give kudos to the direction as well, the director pulled out incredible moments of truth in these actors. The Reverend was a highlight; what a total wackjob and you know that kind of a maniac exists. I highly, highly recommend this show. You will not be disappointed. I plan to attend the closing night.

sweet - Henry Salloway