Cabaret

Critics

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100 %

Reviews: 12

Audience

LemonMeter

Reviews: 0

Wilkommen. Bienvenue. Welcome. This is The Kit Kat Klub... the seediest, sexiest nightclub in Berlin. In here, life isn't just beautiful - it's downright dangerous. If you're not careful, you could lose your perspective on the world outside. Fight that urge. RESIST. Celebration Theatre presents Kander & Ebb's dark, eerily relevant masterpiece like you've never seen it before.

Reviews

Avatar
"Director Michael Matthews gets energetic and layered performances from his cast... Choreographer Janet Roston gets a stunning amount of action on such a small stage. The energy never flags as the ensemble uses every inch available to them."

sweet - Harker Jones - Arts in LA - ...read full review


Eric A Gordon
"Schneider is ultimately persuaded by social pressure not to marry a Jew, even though this would seem to be a last chance at marital happiness for both of them. In this case, the visible disparity is not between Jew and Christian, but between Black and white, with the “despised” role reversed. Very clever! In her song “What Would You Do?” she admits she's simply afraid, given how fast things are moving now, to risk losing whatever modest social status she has. She is the “good German” perhaps, someone who in her heart knows better, but bends away from her conscience so as not to make trouble for herself. As foreigners, Cliff and Sally have the option to leave the coming madness and go home, which Cliff does and Sally doesn't, at least not yet (perhaps a reference to the sultry Swedish singer Zara Leander who made her career in Germany and stayed for the duration). But Schneider really doesn't have that option, and what in Germany's past could have led Herr Schultz and other Jews to foresee what eventually happened? Some Germans of conscience, and the means to do so, such as Thomas Mann and Stefan Zweig, emigrated. But most people had their families, their homes, their farm, their job, and made the best of the new situation. And so it goes…. As Aditi Juneja has tweeted in a much shared post, “If you've wondered what you would've done during slavery, the Holocaust, or Civil Rights movement…you're doing it now.” Which seems to be the point of the Celebration production here and now."

sweet - Eric A Gordon - People's World - ...read full review


Erin Conley
"Cabaret, the classic 1966 musical by Kander and Ebb is currently playing in Los Angeles in a lively and timely production at the intimate Celebration Theatre that demands the audience reexamine the story's warnings against fascism in the light of current events."

sweet - Erin Conley - On Stage and Screen - ...read full review


Dan Berkowitz
"Most successful musicals have what I've come to call a “transcendent moment” – that point where the audience's hearts grow full, eyes grow moist, and throats grow lumps, as the characters onstage experience an epiphany, achieve a goal, or “find their way.” Even that paean to rudeness, "The Book of Mormon," has such a transcendent moment – but not "Cabaret." It's hard-edged and dry-eyed from beginning to end, and thankfully Mr. Matthews and his cohorts have resisted the urge to soften it at all. We're living in a hard-edged time right now, and this "Cabaret" – alas – fits extraordinarily well."

sweet - Dan Berkowitz - The Los Angeles Post - ...read full review


Tin Pan L.A.
"To say Cabaret is a well-known musical is an understatement—its tuneful score and chilling story are iconic earning itself a rightful place in the musical theater canon. What is also true is that it's only produced by theatre companies that have both the means and aptitude to fully realize the force that the show requires. Earlier this year La Mirada Theatre presented a dazzling version of Cabaret on the big stage, and now Celebration Theatre presents this show as the final offering of its 2017-2018 season—and what an offering it is for LA audiences. Simply put, whereas La Mirada's version allows audiences to sit back to watch the show from afar, Celebration Theatre's version encourages you to lean in close to become part of the drama at hand."

sweet - Tin Pan L.A. - ...read full review


Michael Van Duzer
"From the first potent image of the Emcee (Alex Nee) rising out of a smoky, Stygian darkness, director Michael Matthews announces his intention of challenging our thoughts about Kander and Ebb's classic musical Cabaret. This does not mean that Matthews is disrespectful of the material. He's too good a director to make arbitrary or perverse decisions just to be different. It means that he has studied the script and score in such detail that he is able to find a concept that is personal, provocative, and original."

sweet - Michael Van Duzer - ShowMag - ...read full review


Katie Buenneke
"There's much to like, and little to dislike. The pacing drags a bit towards the end of the first act, and the cast is done a disservice by not being able to see music director Anthony Zediker, who is tucked away with the orchestra above the action. This leads to a few moments that are just slightly off, musically. But those are small quibbles against the tremendous overall effect of the show. Celebration's Cabaret hits all the right notes and brings enough novelty to the table to make an old story feel fresh."

sweet - Katie Buenneke - Stage Raw - ...read full review


Avatar
"...the best reason of all is that Cabaret is being given a smashingly good, brilliantly inventive, gloriously eye-filling, unflaggingly exciting revival. It gives the audience one of those experiences that send a tingle up its spine and reminds it that the play's the thing wherein to catch the conscience of our times. In short, it's a hell of a show. It's a dandy entertainment."

sweet - Tony Frankel - Stage and Cinema - ...read full review


Don Grigware
"Brilliant tour.de.force for director Michael Matthews and a splendid cast. Janet Roston's choreography blows the roof off the tiny space."

sweet - Don Grigware - BroadwayWorld.com - ...read full review


Travis Michael Holder
"Under Michael Matthews' visionary direction, the production's single playing space easily transforms from the club into the train station where Cliff prophetically first meets his nemesis Ernst and then morphs into the parlor of Fraulein Schneider's rooming house with little set changes applied beyond lighting and sound cues. All the dramatic scenes unfold in this shared area, although it's hard not to wait patiently to return to the Kit Kat, where the huge and jarringly sensual production numbers choreographed by Janet Roston are the true wonder of this excellent and surprisingly fresh revival."

sweet - Travis Michael Holder - TicketHolders LA - ...read full review


Ellen Dostal
"Matthews has constructed a pressure cooker of a show, using it as an allegory of our own American political journey. The way he ties Cabaret's Emcee to the message is equal parts disturbing and beautiful. From the initial picture that opens the show to the final monstrous ending image, this one will chill you to the bone."

sweet - Ellen Dostal - BroadwayWorld Los Angeles - ...read full review


Rob Stevens
"The tiny Celebration Theatre in Hollywood has just opened what is nearly an immersive staging and is most definitely an unforgettable production that any theatre aficionado cannot afford to miss...Alex Nee's performance as The Emcee goes beyond the sleaze and degeneracy usually infused in his character; he is downright feral. He totally dominates the proceedings, giving even the hottest action a cold and chilling demeanor."

sweet - Rob Stevens - Haines His Way - ...read full review


Avatar
"Director Michael Matthews gets energetic and layered performances from his cast... Choreographer Janet Roston gets a stunning amount of action on such a small stage. The energy never flags as the ensemble uses every inch available to them."

sweet - Harker Jones - Arts in LA - ...read full review


Eric A Gordon
"Schneider is ultimately persuaded by social pressure not to marry a Jew, even though this would seem to be a last chance at marital happiness for both of them. In this case, the visible disparity is not between Jew and Christian, but between Black and white, with the “despised” role reversed. Very clever! In her song “What Would You Do?” she admits she's simply afraid, given how fast things are moving now, to risk losing whatever modest social status she has. She is the “good German” perhaps, someone who in her heart knows better, but bends away from her conscience so as not to make trouble for herself. As foreigners, Cliff and Sally have the option to leave the coming madness and go home, which Cliff does and Sally doesn't, at least not yet (perhaps a reference to the sultry Swedish singer Zara Leander who made her career in Germany and stayed for the duration). But Schneider really doesn't have that option, and what in Germany's past could have led Herr Schultz and other Jews to foresee what eventually happened? Some Germans of conscience, and the means to do so, such as Thomas Mann and Stefan Zweig, emigrated. But most people had their families, their homes, their farm, their job, and made the best of the new situation. And so it goes…. As Aditi Juneja has tweeted in a much shared post, “If you've wondered what you would've done during slavery, the Holocaust, or Civil Rights movement…you're doing it now.” Which seems to be the point of the Celebration production here and now."

sweet - Eric A Gordon - People's World - ...read full review


Erin Conley
"Cabaret, the classic 1966 musical by Kander and Ebb is currently playing in Los Angeles in a lively and timely production at the intimate Celebration Theatre that demands the audience reexamine the story's warnings against fascism in the light of current events."

sweet - Erin Conley - On Stage and Screen - ...read full review


Dan Berkowitz
"Most successful musicals have what I've come to call a “transcendent moment” – that point where the audience's hearts grow full, eyes grow moist, and throats grow lumps, as the characters onstage experience an epiphany, achieve a goal, or “find their way.” Even that paean to rudeness, "The Book of Mormon," has such a transcendent moment – but not "Cabaret." It's hard-edged and dry-eyed from beginning to end, and thankfully Mr. Matthews and his cohorts have resisted the urge to soften it at all. We're living in a hard-edged time right now, and this "Cabaret" – alas – fits extraordinarily well."

sweet - Dan Berkowitz - The Los Angeles Post - ...read full review


Tin Pan L.A.
"To say Cabaret is a well-known musical is an understatement—its tuneful score and chilling story are iconic earning itself a rightful place in the musical theater canon. What is also true is that it's only produced by theatre companies that have both the means and aptitude to fully realize the force that the show requires. Earlier this year La Mirada Theatre presented a dazzling version of Cabaret on the big stage, and now Celebration Theatre presents this show as the final offering of its 2017-2018 season—and what an offering it is for LA audiences. Simply put, whereas La Mirada's version allows audiences to sit back to watch the show from afar, Celebration Theatre's version encourages you to lean in close to become part of the drama at hand."

sweet - Tin Pan L.A. - ...read full review


Michael Van Duzer
"From the first potent image of the Emcee (Alex Nee) rising out of a smoky, Stygian darkness, director Michael Matthews announces his intention of challenging our thoughts about Kander and Ebb's classic musical Cabaret. This does not mean that Matthews is disrespectful of the material. He's too good a director to make arbitrary or perverse decisions just to be different. It means that he has studied the script and score in such detail that he is able to find a concept that is personal, provocative, and original."

sweet - Michael Van Duzer - ShowMag - ...read full review


Katie Buenneke
"There's much to like, and little to dislike. The pacing drags a bit towards the end of the first act, and the cast is done a disservice by not being able to see music director Anthony Zediker, who is tucked away with the orchestra above the action. This leads to a few moments that are just slightly off, musically. But those are small quibbles against the tremendous overall effect of the show. Celebration's Cabaret hits all the right notes and brings enough novelty to the table to make an old story feel fresh."

sweet - Katie Buenneke - Stage Raw - ...read full review


Avatar
"...the best reason of all is that Cabaret is being given a smashingly good, brilliantly inventive, gloriously eye-filling, unflaggingly exciting revival. It gives the audience one of those experiences that send a tingle up its spine and reminds it that the play's the thing wherein to catch the conscience of our times. In short, it's a hell of a show. It's a dandy entertainment."

sweet - Tony Frankel - Stage and Cinema - ...read full review


Don Grigware
"Brilliant tour.de.force for director Michael Matthews and a splendid cast. Janet Roston's choreography blows the roof off the tiny space."

sweet - Don Grigware - BroadwayWorld.com - ...read full review


Travis Michael Holder
"Under Michael Matthews' visionary direction, the production's single playing space easily transforms from the club into the train station where Cliff prophetically first meets his nemesis Ernst and then morphs into the parlor of Fraulein Schneider's rooming house with little set changes applied beyond lighting and sound cues. All the dramatic scenes unfold in this shared area, although it's hard not to wait patiently to return to the Kit Kat, where the huge and jarringly sensual production numbers choreographed by Janet Roston are the true wonder of this excellent and surprisingly fresh revival."

sweet - Travis Michael Holder - TicketHolders LA - ...read full review


Ellen Dostal
"Matthews has constructed a pressure cooker of a show, using it as an allegory of our own American political journey. The way he ties Cabaret's Emcee to the message is equal parts disturbing and beautiful. From the initial picture that opens the show to the final monstrous ending image, this one will chill you to the bone."

sweet - Ellen Dostal - BroadwayWorld Los Angeles - ...read full review


Rob Stevens
"The tiny Celebration Theatre in Hollywood has just opened what is nearly an immersive staging and is most definitely an unforgettable production that any theatre aficionado cannot afford to miss...Alex Nee's performance as The Emcee goes beyond the sleaze and degeneracy usually infused in his character; he is downright feral. He totally dominates the proceedings, giving even the hottest action a cold and chilling demeanor."

sweet - Rob Stevens - Haines His Way - ...read full review