Dead Accounts

Critics

LemonMeter

90 %

Reviews: 5

Audience

LemonMeter

Reviews: 0

Dead Accounts
by Theresa Rebeck, directed by Branda Lock

Quick-witted Jack, a banker from New York, unexpectedly returns home to Ohio after several years in the Big Apple. His smart, acerbic, and yearning-for-more sister, Lorna, and his worried and talkative mother, Barbara, immediately suspect he is in some kind of trouble. Their suspicions are confirmed when Jack's estranged wife, Jenny, comes to town and reveals that Jack has stolen 27 million dollars. Set in a kitchen in suburban Cincinnati, this comedy tackles the timely issues of corporate greed, small-town values, and whether or not your family will always welcome you back, with no questions asked.

Featuring Doug Mattingly, Selena Price, Geraldine D. Fuentes, Karthik Srinivasan*, Casey O'Keefe

Reviews

Paul Myrvold - Theatre Notes

As portrayed by this cast in this dark comedy production under the excellent direction of Branda Lock, all the characters are unique and appealing, each in their own way...

There are so many things I like about this show. I loved the hilarious scenes where Lorna talks on the phone, while her mother talks over her at the same time. I was amazed by how much real food and drink are consumed in the show. The clean, detailed set by Tristan Griffin, with lights by Bruce Starrett and props by the director, represents a realistic, unpretentious kitchen. It is easily the best set I have seen at Little Fish. Costumes by MarLee Candell support character, place and action. Sound Design by Doug Mattingly is excellent, and features a terrific incidental-music playlist. Aileen Kamoshita manages the stage with confident aplomb.

sweet - Paul Myrvold - Theatre Notes - ...read full review


Steven Stanley

Entertaining and engaging throughout, Dead Accounts is worth seeing for its acting ensemble alone. Dig deeper and you may just find some thought-provoking commentary what ails America today.

sweet - Steven Stanley - StageSceneLA - ...read full review


Leigh Kennicott

If a crime occurs and nobody finds it, is it still a crime? That’s what Rebeck’s Recession-era play, Dead Accounts, seeks to unravel. In Rebeck’s revealing style, the family banter soon reveals a little matter of 27 million dollars knocks over the family’s traditional values of right and wrong.   Watching the events unfold, putting together clues as the characters interact – that’s the joy of watching a really compelling story as it deepens. And the ending will leave you wondering…what would you do if you found 27 million dollars that no one owned?

sweet - Leigh Kennicott - ShowMag - ...read full review


Avatar

Director Branda Lock handles her task admirably with a cast seemingly tailored for their roles... She conjures up smoothly evolving plots, generously sprinkled with laughs, here mostly at the expense of Mamma Barbara whose ratchet mouth must be powered by an Energizer Bunny battery. Unfortunately, inspiration failed her at the very end of this piece.

sweet-sour - Ingrid Wilmot - Will Call - ...read full review


Patrick Chavis

The director has an eye for comedy and keeps the action of the characters varied. 8.3 out of 10 - It’s a good show!

sweet - Patrick Chavis - LA Theatre Bites - ...read full review


Paul Myrvold - Theatre Notes

As portrayed by this cast in this dark comedy production under the excellent direction of Branda Lock, all the characters are unique and appealing, each in their own way...

There are so many things I like about this show. I loved the hilarious scenes where Lorna talks on the phone, while her mother talks over her at the same time. I was amazed by how much real food and drink are consumed in the show. The clean, detailed set by Tristan Griffin, with lights by Bruce Starrett and props by the director, represents a realistic, unpretentious kitchen. It is easily the best set I have seen at Little Fish. Costumes by MarLee Candell support character, place and action. Sound Design by Doug Mattingly is excellent, and features a terrific incidental-music playlist. Aileen Kamoshita manages the stage with confident aplomb.

sweet - Paul Myrvold - Theatre Notes - ...read full review


Steven Stanley

Entertaining and engaging throughout, Dead Accounts is worth seeing for its acting ensemble alone. Dig deeper and you may just find some thought-provoking commentary what ails America today.

sweet - Steven Stanley - StageSceneLA - ...read full review


Leigh Kennicott

If a crime occurs and nobody finds it, is it still a crime? That’s what Rebeck’s Recession-era play, Dead Accounts, seeks to unravel. In Rebeck’s revealing style, the family banter soon reveals a little matter of 27 million dollars knocks over the family’s traditional values of right and wrong.   Watching the events unfold, putting together clues as the characters interact – that’s the joy of watching a really compelling story as it deepens. And the ending will leave you wondering…what would you do if you found 27 million dollars that no one owned?

sweet - Leigh Kennicott - ShowMag - ...read full review


Avatar

Director Branda Lock handles her task admirably with a cast seemingly tailored for their roles... She conjures up smoothly evolving plots, generously sprinkled with laughs, here mostly at the expense of Mamma Barbara whose ratchet mouth must be powered by an Energizer Bunny battery. Unfortunately, inspiration failed her at the very end of this piece.

sweet-sour - Ingrid Wilmot - Will Call - ...read full review


Patrick Chavis

The director has an eye for comedy and keeps the action of the characters varied. 8.3 out of 10 - It’s a good show!

sweet - Patrick Chavis - LA Theatre Bites - ...read full review