Grey Nomad

Critics

LemonMeter

90 %

Reviews: 10

Audience

LemonMeter

Reviews: 0

L.A.'s Australian Theatre Company presents Dan Lee's funny, engaging comedy about two retired couples who have dedicated their lives to RVing around Australia. It's a comic road show that captures the unique sense of camaraderie and almost supernatural devotion to a lifestyle of perpetual circumnavigation led by the free range, baby boomers of Australia who call themselves “grey nomads.” Sept 11 through Oct. 8; a visiting production at the Skylight Theatre, 1816 1/2 N Vermont Ave., Los Angeles, CA 90027; $29-$39; 866-811-4111 or www.australiantheatrecompany.org

Reviews

Avatar

An evening full of simple humanity and simple humor which will gobsmack you with a simple fairdinkum about life, if you play by all the rules, you'll miss all the fun.

sweet - Earnest Kearney - The Tvolution - ...read full review


Avatar

Lee allows the play to unfold gradually, slowly revealing the humor and complexities of two drastically different marriages, towing the line between serious and silly.

sweet - Dana Martin - Stage Raw - ...read full review


Dan Berkowitz

All the actors are splendid, terrifically funny but utterly believable, and Mr. Sinclair's direction keeps things crackling.... Grey Nomad is Dan Lee's first produced play, and the Australian Theatre Company has done a bang-up job with it. Here's to hearing much more both from Mr. Lee and the Company!

sweet - Dan Berkowitz - The Los Angeles Post - ...read full review


Avatar

It's truly a lovely show, with proper dignity and foolishness intertwining to make it a fun evening.

sweet - Dale Reynolds - EdgeMediaNetwork - ...read full review


Joan Alperin

A REALLY FUN RIDE… funny and touching and a trip worth taking

sweet - Joan Alperin - ...read full review


Travis Michael Holder - Ticket Holders LA

What makes Dan Lee's painfully old-fashioned sitcom-y script palpable, besides his sharply quirky dialogue and insight into the process of growing older despite ourselves, are these veteran performers able to make it work. This is especially true of Ros Gentle, with whom we fall in love as the curious, frustrated, ever-patient Helen in the first minutes. Every subtly pained expression, every moment of closing her fluttering eyelids to regain her composure, is golden, something that proves even more endearing when Val's more outrageously free behavior begins to rub off on her more infinitely more conservative protégée.

sweet - Travis Michael Holder - TicketHolders LA - ...read full review


Avatar

This play is hands down one of the funniest plays of the year. Gentle, Hammers, Paterson, and Tassone are comedic geniuses. The audience was roaring of laughter throughout the show; the play is 80% laughs and 20% serious and sweet stuff. Their chemistry as a whole cast made for an extremely successful show. Not only were the performances given by the actors phenomenal but the script, written by Dan Lee, is superb.

sweet - Meg Taylor - ...read full review


Shari Barrett

Lee's play is written with a very distinct Australian voice, making it a bit difficult to understand certain phrases not familiar to American ears. But no worries as the humor, just like the lifestyle, is increasingly universal, and I guarantee you will be laughing at yourself and your own relationships as reflected in the two couples at the center of the comedy.

sweet - Shari Barrett - ...read full review


Steven Stanley

All of this adds up to a play that feels both original and familiar, and with director Iain Sinclair eliciting four of the most delectable performances you'll see any time soon, from Paterson's stick-in-the-mud curmudgeon to Hammers' unstoppable force of nature to Tassone's life-devouring torso-flaunter and above all to the remarkable Gentle, whose transformation from caterpillar to butterfly is a joy to behold.

sweet - Steven Stanley - ...read full review


Cynthia Citron

Dan Lee's play is predictable, boring, and nearly unfathomable due to the garbled accents, quirky vernacular, and fast-paced delivery of the players. Because the play apparently contains many Australian idioms (which you can neither decipher nor understand because of the tortured speech patterns of the players), there is a glossary included in the playbill. For example, “a headless chook” is someone who is not thinking clearly; if someone takes off without warning, he has “dunna runna” (done a runner); and if you say someone is “a bit ‘how's your father'” you are indicating that the person is odd, “not quite right.”

sour - Cynthia Citron - Santa Monica Daily Press - ...read full review


Avatar

An evening full of simple humanity and simple humor which will gobsmack you with a simple fairdinkum about life, if you play by all the rules, you'll miss all the fun.

sweet - Earnest Kearney - The Tvolution - ...read full review


Avatar

Lee allows the play to unfold gradually, slowly revealing the humor and complexities of two drastically different marriages, towing the line between serious and silly.

sweet - Dana Martin - Stage Raw - ...read full review


Dan Berkowitz

All the actors are splendid, terrifically funny but utterly believable, and Mr. Sinclair's direction keeps things crackling.... Grey Nomad is Dan Lee's first produced play, and the Australian Theatre Company has done a bang-up job with it. Here's to hearing much more both from Mr. Lee and the Company!

sweet - Dan Berkowitz - The Los Angeles Post - ...read full review


Avatar

It's truly a lovely show, with proper dignity and foolishness intertwining to make it a fun evening.

sweet - Dale Reynolds - EdgeMediaNetwork - ...read full review


Joan Alperin

A REALLY FUN RIDE… funny and touching and a trip worth taking

sweet - Joan Alperin - ...read full review


Travis Michael Holder - Ticket Holders LA

What makes Dan Lee's painfully old-fashioned sitcom-y script palpable, besides his sharply quirky dialogue and insight into the process of growing older despite ourselves, are these veteran performers able to make it work. This is especially true of Ros Gentle, with whom we fall in love as the curious, frustrated, ever-patient Helen in the first minutes. Every subtly pained expression, every moment of closing her fluttering eyelids to regain her composure, is golden, something that proves even more endearing when Val's more outrageously free behavior begins to rub off on her more infinitely more conservative protégée.

sweet - Travis Michael Holder - TicketHolders LA - ...read full review


Avatar

This play is hands down one of the funniest plays of the year. Gentle, Hammers, Paterson, and Tassone are comedic geniuses. The audience was roaring of laughter throughout the show; the play is 80% laughs and 20% serious and sweet stuff. Their chemistry as a whole cast made for an extremely successful show. Not only were the performances given by the actors phenomenal but the script, written by Dan Lee, is superb.

sweet - Meg Taylor - ...read full review


Shari Barrett

Lee's play is written with a very distinct Australian voice, making it a bit difficult to understand certain phrases not familiar to American ears. But no worries as the humor, just like the lifestyle, is increasingly universal, and I guarantee you will be laughing at yourself and your own relationships as reflected in the two couples at the center of the comedy.

sweet - Shari Barrett - ...read full review


Steven Stanley

All of this adds up to a play that feels both original and familiar, and with director Iain Sinclair eliciting four of the most delectable performances you'll see any time soon, from Paterson's stick-in-the-mud curmudgeon to Hammers' unstoppable force of nature to Tassone's life-devouring torso-flaunter and above all to the remarkable Gentle, whose transformation from caterpillar to butterfly is a joy to behold.

sweet - Steven Stanley - ...read full review


Cynthia Citron

Dan Lee's play is predictable, boring, and nearly unfathomable due to the garbled accents, quirky vernacular, and fast-paced delivery of the players. Because the play apparently contains many Australian idioms (which you can neither decipher nor understand because of the tortured speech patterns of the players), there is a glossary included in the playbill. For example, “a headless chook” is someone who is not thinking clearly; if someone takes off without warning, he has “dunna runna” (done a runner); and if you say someone is “a bit ‘how's your father'” you are indicating that the person is odd, “not quite right.”

sour - Cynthia Citron - Santa Monica Daily Press - ...read full review