How the Light Gets In

Critics

LemonMeter

86 %

Reviews: 7

Audience

LemonMeter

Reviews: 0

“There is a crack, a crack in everything
That’s how the light gets in.”
–Leonard Cohen

A travel writer who never travels. A Japanese architect who can’t figure out how to build a simple tea house. A gifted tattoo artist who resists the power of his talents. And a homeless girl who lives under a weeping willow tree in the Japanese Garden. Four lonely people, their stories written on paper, earth, and skin, find each other when one of them falls apart. Together they realize the heart is as strong as it is fragile, and that the safety of home might be found in the most fearsome explorations. A beautiful, haunting, and richly human world premiere from the author of The Gun Show and Song of Extinction.

Reviews

Leigh Kennicott

‘Light’ is an apt metaphor that describes Boston Court’s Emilie Pascale Beck invisibly light touch as director of E.M. Lewis’ new play, How the Light Gets In. The play examines the toll breast cancer takes on Grace Wheeler (Amy Sloan), an otherwise empowered ‘woman of a certain age’, whose emotional journey succeeds only with the aid of a pair of improbable allies: Kat (Chelsea Kurtz), a teen camped out beneath the weeping willow in a Japanese Garden and Haruki (Ryun Yu), a world-renowned architect commissioned to build a simple tea house there. The result is a sweet reminder that we are all capable of providing enough light to heal those around us who are suffering. Dieterich Gray as the tattooist Tommy Z provides welcome surcease from the sort of sentimental treacle most dramas about disease exhibit.

sweet - Leigh Kennicott - ShowMag - ...read full review


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Going to the theatre can be an act of faith, a search for meaning or simply a search for entertainment. It’s unusual to come across a play that satisfies all three in a production that refuses to leave you long after you’ve left it — the most nourishing of possible outcomes.

You will find it at Pasadena’s Boston Court for another ten days (it closes October 27). How the Light Gets In is a study in inward emotions. You may read into that whatever you wish. This intimate piece is written with a few well-chosen words by E. M. Lewis and directed by Emilie Pascale Beck just as quintessentially as it is written. That is its triumph.

sweet - Sylvie Drake - Cultural Weekly - ...read full review


Deborah Klugman

Several well-known works and many lesser ones have been written about women coping with breast cancer — its mutilation of the body, its testing of the spirit. In this regard How the Lights Gets In treads no new terrain. What it does do is portray four people, in their loneliness, bereavement and/or deprivation, with a poignant dignity, one bred from the simple acts of the benevolence they provide each other.

sweet - Deborah Klugman - Stage Raw - ...read full review


Avatar

“How the light gets in” is a play that fits within the Boston Court aesthetic but it’s not a play that’s going to win you over. If you love what they do, go. If cancer is a story that’s part of your life - this may resonate with you … but don’t expect too much drama.

sweet-sour - Anthony Byrnes - KCRW - ...read full review


Patrick Chavis

E.M. Lewis and Boston Court deliver a touching and well performed production. Though at times the story wobbles a bit in the end the production comes together for a satisfying tale about the human spirit.

sweet - Matthew Robinson - LA Theatre Bites - ...read full review


Avatar

Workshopped last summer here at Boston Court Pasadena and recently at Chautauqua Theatre Company in New York, the play now gets a full-length staging, and the months of hard work show. Playwright E.M. Lewis and Director Emilie Pascale Beck achieve a smart written, loving look at a rocky topic: how to let go of fear – or at least, learn to live through it.

sweet - Melanie Hooks - Colorado Boulevard - ...read full review


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The play’s frequent reliance on characters’ narration directly addressed to the audience proves a mixed bag. It’s an efficient technique to cover backstories and internal states, but it’s less artful than revelation through interaction. Some particularly effective dialogue is undercut with confessional asides that the conversation actually unfolded a different way — a lazy shortcut to expressing difficult truths.

The four actors consistently engage, hitting all the right emotional beats. In a standout performance, though, Yu adds marvelously ironic character-revealing inflections to even the most matter-of-fact lines.

sweet-sour - Philip Brandes - LA Times - ...read full review


Leigh Kennicott

‘Light’ is an apt metaphor that describes Boston Court’s Emilie Pascale Beck invisibly light touch as director of E.M. Lewis’ new play, How the Light Gets In. The play examines the toll breast cancer takes on Grace Wheeler (Amy Sloan), an otherwise empowered ‘woman of a certain age’, whose emotional journey succeeds only with the aid of a pair of improbable allies: Kat (Chelsea Kurtz), a teen camped out beneath the weeping willow in a Japanese Garden and Haruki (Ryun Yu), a world-renowned architect commissioned to build a simple tea house there. The result is a sweet reminder that we are all capable of providing enough light to heal those around us who are suffering. Dieterich Gray as the tattooist Tommy Z provides welcome surcease from the sort of sentimental treacle most dramas about disease exhibit.

sweet - Leigh Kennicott - ShowMag - ...read full review


Avatar

Going to the theatre can be an act of faith, a search for meaning or simply a search for entertainment. It’s unusual to come across a play that satisfies all three in a production that refuses to leave you long after you’ve left it — the most nourishing of possible outcomes.

You will find it at Pasadena’s Boston Court for another ten days (it closes October 27). How the Light Gets In is a study in inward emotions. You may read into that whatever you wish. This intimate piece is written with a few well-chosen words by E. M. Lewis and directed by Emilie Pascale Beck just as quintessentially as it is written. That is its triumph.

sweet - Sylvie Drake - Cultural Weekly - ...read full review


Deborah Klugman

Several well-known works and many lesser ones have been written about women coping with breast cancer — its mutilation of the body, its testing of the spirit. In this regard How the Lights Gets In treads no new terrain. What it does do is portray four people, in their loneliness, bereavement and/or deprivation, with a poignant dignity, one bred from the simple acts of the benevolence they provide each other.

sweet - Deborah Klugman - Stage Raw - ...read full review


Avatar

“How the light gets in” is a play that fits within the Boston Court aesthetic but it’s not a play that’s going to win you over. If you love what they do, go. If cancer is a story that’s part of your life - this may resonate with you … but don’t expect too much drama.

sweet-sour - Anthony Byrnes - KCRW - ...read full review


Patrick Chavis

E.M. Lewis and Boston Court deliver a touching and well performed production. Though at times the story wobbles a bit in the end the production comes together for a satisfying tale about the human spirit.

sweet - Matthew Robinson - LA Theatre Bites - ...read full review


Avatar

Workshopped last summer here at Boston Court Pasadena and recently at Chautauqua Theatre Company in New York, the play now gets a full-length staging, and the months of hard work show. Playwright E.M. Lewis and Director Emilie Pascale Beck achieve a smart written, loving look at a rocky topic: how to let go of fear – or at least, learn to live through it.

sweet - Melanie Hooks - Colorado Boulevard - ...read full review


Avatar

The play’s frequent reliance on characters’ narration directly addressed to the audience proves a mixed bag. It’s an efficient technique to cover backstories and internal states, but it’s less artful than revelation through interaction. Some particularly effective dialogue is undercut with confessional asides that the conversation actually unfolded a different way — a lazy shortcut to expressing difficult truths.

The four actors consistently engage, hitting all the right emotional beats. In a standout performance, though, Yu adds marvelously ironic character-revealing inflections to even the most matter-of-fact lines.

sweet-sour - Philip Brandes - LA Times - ...read full review