Hughie & Krapp's Last Tape

Critics

LemonMeter

67 %

Reviews: 9

Audience

LemonMeter

Reviews: 0

Hughie Written by Eugene O'Neill

When high-rolling gambler and small-time hustler Erie Smith loses his confidant Hughie, his life takes a turn for the worse. In his grief, Erie befriends a new hotel night clerk and sees a chance for a winning streak.

Krapp's Last Tape Written by Samuel Beckett

Preparing for his birthday ritual, Krapp stumbles upon a recording of a tender memory from a lifetime ago. As he immerses himself in his own personal history, Krapp questions whether his present lives up to his past.

Reviews

Deborah Klugman

..... Dennehy's rendering is the work of a crackerjack craftsman, in a performance that runs the gamut from outrageous to poignant.

sweet - Deborah Klugman - StageRaw - ...read full review


Shari Barrett

Both one-acts in this masterful and memorable double-billing, directed by Steven Robman, are reflective and confessional in nature, BWW Review: Brian Dennehy Inhabits Lives Remembered in HUGHIE and KRAPP'S LAST TAPE at the Geffen Playhousewith each of the main characters portrayed by masterful actor Brian Dennehy sharing tales of their lives in an attempt to make sense of the way it has turned out for them, especially since the present does not seem to have lived up to the excitement of the past. Perhaps that universal truth is what united these two one acts, with O'Neill and Beckett asking audiences to take a look back at our own lives and realize that even when things seem hopeless and/or meaningless, memories of times past may be the thing to break your downward spiral.

sweet - Shari Barrett - Broadway World - ...read full review


Avatar

Beckett knows how to dramatize stasis and create his own special, grotesque, and yet heart-breaking world. He's done all of that and more in Krapp, and while I'm not sorry I saw the play, I left the theater thinking that I never wanted to see it again.

sour - Willard Manus - Total Theater - ...read full review


Avatar

Dennehy paints a heart-wrenching portrait of what it means to see — or more accurately, hear — oneself as one truly is.

sweet - Tony Frankel - Stage and Cinema - ...read full review


Avatar

It's Dennehy's play, no doubt about that. But as good as Dennehy is, and he's very good, the seamless directorial hand of Steven Robman adds to the professionalism in these two impressive pieces. He applies it ever so lightly; making it so much more effective. It's a classic case of less is more effective than too much. Well done by all three gentlemen.

sweet - Jack Lyons - Desert Local News - ...read full review


Avatar

This 80 year-old thespian powerhouse hits and misses and it seems he knows it. Dennehy waves off a standing ovation as he exits the stage without taking a bow or looking at the audience with the house lights abruptly rising. But when he hits? It's with a depth that will leave chills down your spine as he climbs into the marrow of your bones and touches your heart with revelations of childlike vulnerability.

sweet-sour - Judy Shields - The Hollywood Times - ...read full review


Avatar

Steven Robman gets credit for directing here, most likely more responsible for planning and shepherding the design elements than for shaping the performance.

sour - Dany Margolies - Daily News - ...read full review


Avatar

A master class in acting, Brian Dennehy's performances in Hughie and Krapp's Last Tape delve into two lost souls, circling the drain of dissolution. Though he creates distinct personalities for both men, he recognizes and projects how they both have allowed life to pass them by.

sweet - Jonas Schwartz - Theater Mania - ...read full review


Avatar

“Hughie & Krapp's Last Tape,” a double-shot of desolation, aren't meant to be yoked together. But Dennehy's commanding stage presence charges the bill with theatrical significance even when the production falters.

sweet-sour - Charles McNulty - LA Times - ...read full review


Deborah Klugman

..... Dennehy's rendering is the work of a crackerjack craftsman, in a performance that runs the gamut from outrageous to poignant.

sweet - Deborah Klugman - StageRaw - ...read full review


Shari Barrett

Both one-acts in this masterful and memorable double-billing, directed by Steven Robman, are reflective and confessional in nature, BWW Review: Brian Dennehy Inhabits Lives Remembered in HUGHIE and KRAPP'S LAST TAPE at the Geffen Playhousewith each of the main characters portrayed by masterful actor Brian Dennehy sharing tales of their lives in an attempt to make sense of the way it has turned out for them, especially since the present does not seem to have lived up to the excitement of the past. Perhaps that universal truth is what united these two one acts, with O'Neill and Beckett asking audiences to take a look back at our own lives and realize that even when things seem hopeless and/or meaningless, memories of times past may be the thing to break your downward spiral.

sweet - Shari Barrett - Broadway World - ...read full review


Avatar

Beckett knows how to dramatize stasis and create his own special, grotesque, and yet heart-breaking world. He's done all of that and more in Krapp, and while I'm not sorry I saw the play, I left the theater thinking that I never wanted to see it again.

sour - Willard Manus - Total Theater - ...read full review


Avatar

Dennehy paints a heart-wrenching portrait of what it means to see — or more accurately, hear — oneself as one truly is.

sweet - Tony Frankel - Stage and Cinema - ...read full review


Avatar

It's Dennehy's play, no doubt about that. But as good as Dennehy is, and he's very good, the seamless directorial hand of Steven Robman adds to the professionalism in these two impressive pieces. He applies it ever so lightly; making it so much more effective. It's a classic case of less is more effective than too much. Well done by all three gentlemen.

sweet - Jack Lyons - Desert Local News - ...read full review


Avatar

This 80 year-old thespian powerhouse hits and misses and it seems he knows it. Dennehy waves off a standing ovation as he exits the stage without taking a bow or looking at the audience with the house lights abruptly rising. But when he hits? It's with a depth that will leave chills down your spine as he climbs into the marrow of your bones and touches your heart with revelations of childlike vulnerability.

sweet-sour - Judy Shields - The Hollywood Times - ...read full review


Avatar

Steven Robman gets credit for directing here, most likely more responsible for planning and shepherding the design elements than for shaping the performance.

sour - Dany Margolies - Daily News - ...read full review


Avatar

A master class in acting, Brian Dennehy's performances in Hughie and Krapp's Last Tape delve into two lost souls, circling the drain of dissolution. Though he creates distinct personalities for both men, he recognizes and projects how they both have allowed life to pass them by.

sweet - Jonas Schwartz - Theater Mania - ...read full review


Avatar

“Hughie & Krapp's Last Tape,” a double-shot of desolation, aren't meant to be yoked together. But Dennehy's commanding stage presence charges the bill with theatrical significance even when the production falters.

sweet-sour - Charles McNulty - LA Times - ...read full review