Ironbound

Critics

LemonMeter

83 %

Reviews: 9

Audience

LemonMeter

Reviews: 0

Wed Jun 19, 12:00am

At once humorous and heartrending, Ironbound spans 22 years to tell the story of Darja, a Polish immigrant getting by on a cleaning job, aggressive pragmatism and sheer will. In this wry drama, award-winning playwright Martyna Majok points out that sometimes survival is the only measure of success.

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Reviews

Eric A Gordon
"In the West Coast premiere of Martyna Majok's Ironbound, directed by Tyne Rafaeli, Marin Ireland reprises the lead role of Darja, a 40-something Polish immigrant to northern New Jersey's now almost completely evacuated industrial zone. In a taut 80 minutes that has her character on stage the entire time, we see (in a nonlinear succession of scenes) how her life has evolved over a twenty-plus year period, from the early 1990s to more or less the present. It was a bleak life working dead-end factory jobs, yet it was also tragic seeing those factories close their doors, the jobs moving offshore. Now Darja is reduced to cleaning houses of the well-off, but her resentment gets the better of her, and in time that dries up, too. Two marriages failed and now she has a shot at a third. Whatever illusions she had—I guess the politically correct word to say is “dreams”—they have dissolved to grime. She appears as someone on the verge of becoming one more piece of capitalism's human garbage, a castoff with no sunny daybreak tomorrow."

sweet - Eric A Gordon - ...read full review


Steven Stanley
"You may not take to Darja from the get-go, and she certainly doesn't make it easy to love her, but with Marin Ireland bringing her to unforgettable life on the Geffen stage, I defy anyone not to end up smitten."

sweet - Steven Stanley - Stage Scene LA - ...read full review


Shari Barrett
"Now playing at the Geffen Playhouse in Westwood, the 80-minute play IRONBOUND by award-winning playwright Martyna Majok recounts the hard luck life of Polish immigrant Darja and the men she chooses to have in it. Moving between 2014, 1992, and 2006 - but not necessarily in that order - this wry drama points out that sometimes survival is the only measure of success."

sweet - Shari Barrett - ...read full review


"There are two main reasons to see "Ironbound." First and foremost is Ireland's nuanced handling of a figure traditionally relegated to the margins of American drama — and society. Darja is hardly the most pleasant or charming of characters, but she is piercingly human. Ireland, who's able to slough off years from her character's age by simply turning her head, reveals all that has been lost over time in a portrait that connects history with psychology and fate with brute economic facts. The other important reason to see the play is for the way it illuminates the American experience through the immigrant's journey."

sweet - Charles McNulty - LA Times - ...read full review


"These scenes range from largely annoying to somewhat intriguing. The manner in which Tyne Rafaeli has directed the work, and the manner in which Marin Ireland plays Darja, means the audience hears a lot of yelling."

sour - Dany Margolies - Daily Breeze - ...read full review


"Director Tyne Rafaeli never lets the pace lag and inspires excellent performances by the quartet of actors, who appear and disappear in the course of this time-traveling work."

sweet - Ingrid Wilmot - Will Call - ...read full review


"Director Tyne Rafaeli gets terrific acting from her ensemble, but perhaps is most impressive in the skill with which she cleanly delineates each time period, making sure that the roving timeline is never confusing. - RECOMMENDED"

sweet - Terry Morgan - Stage Raw - ...read full review


"Director Tyne Rafaeli does a superb job of creating kinetic momentum, giving dynamism to what is essentially a series of two-hander scenes. Each scene is two people talking, yet the action feels large and the characters own the space."

sweet - Samuel Garza Berstein - Stage and Cinema - ...read full review


Carol Kaufman Segal
"Marin Ireland's Polish accent is perfect, and she, as well as Christian Camargo, Josiah Bania, and Marcel Spears, all give sterling performance. However, I personally found the play, itself, very depressing."

sweet-sour - Carol Kaufman Segal - ...read full review


Eric A Gordon
"In the West Coast premiere of Martyna Majok's Ironbound, directed by Tyne Rafaeli, Marin Ireland reprises the lead role of Darja, a 40-something Polish immigrant to northern New Jersey's now almost completely evacuated industrial zone. In a taut 80 minutes that has her character on stage the entire time, we see (in a nonlinear succession of scenes) how her life has evolved over a twenty-plus year period, from the early 1990s to more or less the present. It was a bleak life working dead-end factory jobs, yet it was also tragic seeing those factories close their doors, the jobs moving offshore. Now Darja is reduced to cleaning houses of the well-off, but her resentment gets the better of her, and in time that dries up, too. Two marriages failed and now she has a shot at a third. Whatever illusions she had—I guess the politically correct word to say is “dreams”—they have dissolved to grime. She appears as someone on the verge of becoming one more piece of capitalism's human garbage, a castoff with no sunny daybreak tomorrow."

sweet - Eric A Gordon - ...read full review


Steven Stanley
"You may not take to Darja from the get-go, and she certainly doesn't make it easy to love her, but with Marin Ireland bringing her to unforgettable life on the Geffen stage, I defy anyone not to end up smitten."

sweet - Steven Stanley - Stage Scene LA - ...read full review


Shari Barrett
"Now playing at the Geffen Playhouse in Westwood, the 80-minute play IRONBOUND by award-winning playwright Martyna Majok recounts the hard luck life of Polish immigrant Darja and the men she chooses to have in it. Moving between 2014, 1992, and 2006 - but not necessarily in that order - this wry drama points out that sometimes survival is the only measure of success."

sweet - Shari Barrett - ...read full review


"There are two main reasons to see "Ironbound." First and foremost is Ireland's nuanced handling of a figure traditionally relegated to the margins of American drama — and society. Darja is hardly the most pleasant or charming of characters, but she is piercingly human. Ireland, who's able to slough off years from her character's age by simply turning her head, reveals all that has been lost over time in a portrait that connects history with psychology and fate with brute economic facts. The other important reason to see the play is for the way it illuminates the American experience through the immigrant's journey."

sweet - Charles McNulty - LA Times - ...read full review


"These scenes range from largely annoying to somewhat intriguing. The manner in which Tyne Rafaeli has directed the work, and the manner in which Marin Ireland plays Darja, means the audience hears a lot of yelling."

sour - Dany Margolies - Daily Breeze - ...read full review


"Director Tyne Rafaeli never lets the pace lag and inspires excellent performances by the quartet of actors, who appear and disappear in the course of this time-traveling work."

sweet - Ingrid Wilmot - Will Call - ...read full review


"Director Tyne Rafaeli gets terrific acting from her ensemble, but perhaps is most impressive in the skill with which she cleanly delineates each time period, making sure that the roving timeline is never confusing. - RECOMMENDED"

sweet - Terry Morgan - Stage Raw - ...read full review


"Director Tyne Rafaeli does a superb job of creating kinetic momentum, giving dynamism to what is essentially a series of two-hander scenes. Each scene is two people talking, yet the action feels large and the characters own the space."

sweet - Samuel Garza Berstein - Stage and Cinema - ...read full review


Carol Kaufman Segal
"Marin Ireland's Polish accent is perfect, and she, as well as Christian Camargo, Josiah Bania, and Marcel Spears, all give sterling performance. However, I personally found the play, itself, very depressing."

sweet-sour - Carol Kaufman Segal - ...read full review