JESUS CHRIST SUPERSTAR

Critics

LemonMeter

67 %

Reviews: 9

Audience

LemonMeter

Reviews: 0

JESUS CHRIST SUPERSTAR is an iconic musical phenomenon with a world-wide fan base. In celebration of its 50th Anniversary, a new mesmerizing production comes to North America. Originally staged by London’s Regent’s Park Open Air Theatre and helmed by the acclaimed director Timothy Sheader (Crazy for You, Into the Woods) and award winning choreographer Drew McOnie (King Kong, Strictly Ballroom), this production won the 2017 Olivier Award for Best Musical Revival garnering unprecedented reviews and accolades. Appealing to both theater audiences and concert music fans, this production pays tribute to the historic 1971 Billboard Album of the Year while creating a modern, theatrical world that is uniquely fresh and inspiring.

Reviews

Avatar

As good as the vocals are though, the focus on the concert performance means that the character connections and relationships feel lacking, making the declarations of love and the betrayals less impactful overall.

sweet-sour - Erin - Talk Theatre to Me - ...read full review


Avatar

Each scene contains emotional intensity, each one more riveting than the previous, with thought provoking moments and a stirring score.  Both satiric and tender hearted in one, Jesus Christ Superstar tugs at one’s heartstrings as it reveals Jesus’ inner turmoil as well as interpersonal struggles with his disciples.  Costume design by Tom Scutt was extremely well executed, with creative, more flashy, avant-garde modern touches, as well as authentic adherence to the traditional, muted tone Biblical era garb.

sweet - Bonnie Priever - Curtain Up - ...read full review


Avatar

There’s energy but little attention to dramatic detail. The production won the 2017 Olivier Award for best musical revival, but something seems not to have made it past Customs. I left singing the show’s catchy number “What’s the Buzz” with impious sarcasm.

sour - Charles McNulty - LA Times - ...read full review


Avatar

As directed by Timothy Sheader and choreographed by Drew McOnie, the 50th Anniversary Revival of the Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice spectacle of history and music does not disappoint. Indeed, the sweetness of the production is the energy and diversity of a passionate ensemble.

...Perhaps the most resonant note in this day and age is their overall diversity.

sweet-sour - John Lavitt - The Hollywood Times - ...read full review


Travis Michael Holder - Ticket Holders LA

Judging from the 30-city touring schedule for this ambitious and well-appointed revival playing one week in each place, perhaps the most amazing thing about it is how the heck such an enormous production can be broken down, transported, reloaded, and be ready for audiences in each city on every seventh day. Obviously, this is one time that on Sundays, the work of the Lord does not remain at rest. You know the old adage about putting lipstick on a pig? Let’s just say anyone who can make JCS look and sound anything other than a week-old carnitas plate from El Coyote, written by a pandering melody thief who created it as nothing more than a cashcow of epic proportions, gets major points from me.

sweet-sour - Travis Michael Holder - Ticket Holders LA - ...read full review


Avatar

The main themes here — power struggles, control, greed — are remarkably clear, visceral and palpable. As if to thrust us into the modern age’s divide between the haves and have-nots, Mr. Sheader has his players hurl sparkling gold dust at Jesus to represent each lash he receives. It’s a coup de théâtre, one of many in this most admirable revival.

sweet - Tony Frankel - Stage and Cinema - ...read full review


Avatar

The company moves through Drew Mconie's choreography to exhaustion while dance captain Rebecca Kritzer steals every number with her spot on technique and endless dynamism. (You literally can't take your eyes off of her.) At the same time, the repetitive dance moves remind one a little of an opening number from an installment of "So You Think You Can Dance."

All of this said, there is something appealing about the show. The set design and lighting is beautiful and I enjoyed the rock concert take on it: if only they extended the 90-minute running time to allow for some emotional connection.

While Beeks is clearly the standout of the show, Tommy Sherlock as Pilate, Tyce Green as Annas, and Paul Louis Lessard as a sort of drag King Herod enliven the show with powerful voices and performances.

For fans of the music, there's a lot to enjoy. While "Gesthemene" doesn't have the power it should and Jesus doesn't embody the warmth his character so desperately needs to emit, this is the mass-market paperback version of Lloyd-Weber's masterpiece which makes it go down easy, but might not have any lasting effect.

sweet-sour - Kevin Taft - Edge Media Network - ...read full review


Avatar

From the opening's haunting guitar solo at the lavish Pantages Theatre, I was once again carried along by the joy of another fine production of this marvelous work. The 90-minutes without intermission passed seamlessly with exciting, frenetic dance numbers and wonderfully performed solos by Aaron LaVigne as Jesus, James Delisco Beeks as Judus, the storyteller. Jenna Rubaii's Mary Magdelene's lovely "I Don't Know How to Love Him" beautifully provided a moving moment to the narrative that we know does not end happily.

sweet - Nyla Arslanian - Discover Hollywood - ...read full review


Rob Stevens

director Timothy Sheader has managed to inject new energy and insight into the proceedings...Aaron LaVigne commands attention as Jesus and his performance of “Gethsmane” is one for the memory...Sheader has provided some memorable visuals—his glitter strewn “39 Lashes” is the most stunning...Jesus Christ Superstar that miraculously spans the 50 years from inception to now

sweet - Rob Stevens - Haines His Way - ...read full review


Avatar

As good as the vocals are though, the focus on the concert performance means that the character connections and relationships feel lacking, making the declarations of love and the betrayals less impactful overall.

sweet-sour - Erin - Talk Theatre to Me - ...read full review


Avatar

Each scene contains emotional intensity, each one more riveting than the previous, with thought provoking moments and a stirring score.  Both satiric and tender hearted in one, Jesus Christ Superstar tugs at one’s heartstrings as it reveals Jesus’ inner turmoil as well as interpersonal struggles with his disciples.  Costume design by Tom Scutt was extremely well executed, with creative, more flashy, avant-garde modern touches, as well as authentic adherence to the traditional, muted tone Biblical era garb.

sweet - Bonnie Priever - Curtain Up - ...read full review


Avatar

There’s energy but little attention to dramatic detail. The production won the 2017 Olivier Award for best musical revival, but something seems not to have made it past Customs. I left singing the show’s catchy number “What’s the Buzz” with impious sarcasm.

sour - Charles McNulty - LA Times - ...read full review


Avatar

As directed by Timothy Sheader and choreographed by Drew McOnie, the 50th Anniversary Revival of the Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice spectacle of history and music does not disappoint. Indeed, the sweetness of the production is the energy and diversity of a passionate ensemble.

...Perhaps the most resonant note in this day and age is their overall diversity.

sweet-sour - John Lavitt - The Hollywood Times - ...read full review


Travis Michael Holder - Ticket Holders LA

Judging from the 30-city touring schedule for this ambitious and well-appointed revival playing one week in each place, perhaps the most amazing thing about it is how the heck such an enormous production can be broken down, transported, reloaded, and be ready for audiences in each city on every seventh day. Obviously, this is one time that on Sundays, the work of the Lord does not remain at rest. You know the old adage about putting lipstick on a pig? Let’s just say anyone who can make JCS look and sound anything other than a week-old carnitas plate from El Coyote, written by a pandering melody thief who created it as nothing more than a cashcow of epic proportions, gets major points from me.

sweet-sour - Travis Michael Holder - Ticket Holders LA - ...read full review


Avatar

The main themes here — power struggles, control, greed — are remarkably clear, visceral and palpable. As if to thrust us into the modern age’s divide between the haves and have-nots, Mr. Sheader has his players hurl sparkling gold dust at Jesus to represent each lash he receives. It’s a coup de théâtre, one of many in this most admirable revival.

sweet - Tony Frankel - Stage and Cinema - ...read full review


Avatar

The company moves through Drew Mconie's choreography to exhaustion while dance captain Rebecca Kritzer steals every number with her spot on technique and endless dynamism. (You literally can't take your eyes off of her.) At the same time, the repetitive dance moves remind one a little of an opening number from an installment of "So You Think You Can Dance."

All of this said, there is something appealing about the show. The set design and lighting is beautiful and I enjoyed the rock concert take on it: if only they extended the 90-minute running time to allow for some emotional connection.

While Beeks is clearly the standout of the show, Tommy Sherlock as Pilate, Tyce Green as Annas, and Paul Louis Lessard as a sort of drag King Herod enliven the show with powerful voices and performances.

For fans of the music, there's a lot to enjoy. While "Gesthemene" doesn't have the power it should and Jesus doesn't embody the warmth his character so desperately needs to emit, this is the mass-market paperback version of Lloyd-Weber's masterpiece which makes it go down easy, but might not have any lasting effect.

sweet-sour - Kevin Taft - Edge Media Network - ...read full review


Avatar

From the opening's haunting guitar solo at the lavish Pantages Theatre, I was once again carried along by the joy of another fine production of this marvelous work. The 90-minutes without intermission passed seamlessly with exciting, frenetic dance numbers and wonderfully performed solos by Aaron LaVigne as Jesus, James Delisco Beeks as Judus, the storyteller. Jenna Rubaii's Mary Magdelene's lovely "I Don't Know How to Love Him" beautifully provided a moving moment to the narrative that we know does not end happily.

sweet - Nyla Arslanian - Discover Hollywood - ...read full review


Rob Stevens

director Timothy Sheader has managed to inject new energy and insight into the proceedings...Aaron LaVigne commands attention as Jesus and his performance of “Gethsmane” is one for the memory...Sheader has provided some memorable visuals—his glitter strewn “39 Lashes” is the most stunning...Jesus Christ Superstar that miraculously spans the 50 years from inception to now

sweet - Rob Stevens - Haines His Way - ...read full review