King Charles III

Critics

LemonMeter

89 %

Reviews: 9

Audience

LemonMeter

Reviews: 0

The Queen is dead. After a lifetime of waiting, the prince ascends to the throne. A future of power. But how to rule? Camilla, William, Kate and Harry join Charles in Mike Bartlett's “future history play,” exploring the people beneath the crown. The Los Angeles premiere of the 2015 Olivier Award-winning best new play. A contemporary Shakespearean drama.

Reviews

Katie Buenneke

Bartlett accurately predicted the futility of Charles' gesture (suffice it to say things don't quite work out for him as he would have liked them to). The problem is that the world has changed rapidly since the play first opened in 2014 in the U.K. and in 2015 on Broadway. While it's a nice thought exercise to explore the hypothetical power of checks and balances when used as intended, it's hard for the play to seem like more than idle conjecture in 2017.

sweet-sour - Katie Buenneke - ...read full review


Dan Berkowitz

Given all this, a play titled "King Charles III" – a fantasy about what happens when Mummy finally does ascend to a heavenly throne and Charles claims his birthright – might conceivably have been written as a farce. But playwright Mike Bartlett chose instead to craft a serious meditation on principles, and how much one might choose to sacrifice to preserve them. In an intelligent, handsome production at the Pasadena Playhouse, director Michael Michetti and a large and splendid cast and crew provide the sort of sumptuous entertainment we see too little of in today's theatre. Hip Hip Hurrah!

sweet - Dan Berkowitz - The Los Angeles Post - ...read full review


Steven Stanley

As compelling and rewarding as it is daring and ambitious, King Charles III cements Mike Bartlett's reputation as one of England's finest young playwrights. Following Deaf West's groundbreakingly brilliant Our Town, the venerable Pasadena Playhouse is on one humdinger of a roll.

sweet - Steven Stanley - Stage Scene LA - ...read full review


Travis Michael Holder - Ticket Holders LA

Utilizing his dynamic cast of 16, director Michael Michetti, along with an amazing design team dominated by the incredibly detailed 100-plus costumes crafted by Alex Jaeger, manages to create a whole empire before us, filling the cavernous Pasadena Playhouse stage with constant movement and brilliantly conjured tricks in staging that keep the implausibility of the storyline from getting in the way of the vision.

sweet - Travis Michael Holder - TicketHolders LA - ...read full review


Avatar

This production is well-staged and well-paced. The actors are excellent at handling the verse, if not the British accents. The Royals have a very specific speech pattern and cadence that largely eludes the cast, and the lower-class accents are particularly general, uneven, and unconvincing.

sweet-sour - Samuel Garza Bernstein - Stage and Cinema - ...read full review


Avatar

Michael Michetti's staging doesn't oversell the drama. The iambic pentameter isn't delivered with percussive éclat but spoken with conversational formality. These larger-than-life figures are intimately approached. They actually seem not-too-distantly human.

sweet - Charles McNulty - LA Times - ...read full review


Avatar

The real beauty of this production lies, not only in the ensemble cast's talent, but also in the expertise of the creative team.

sweet - Jack and Lisa Lyons - Lyons, Views, News and Reviews - ...read full review


Avatar

Jim Abele carries the show as Charles, whose pride may cost him everything he's waited for. He exposes Charles' stubbornness, yet gives us a peek at his gentler side as well.

sweet - Julia Stier - USC Annenberg Media - ...read full review


Avatar

Michetti stages the actors with aplomb, treating them as pieces on a chessboard. Peter Bayne's original music lends a Gothic tension to the mood, aided by the Pasadena Master Chorale, but having the actors mouth the words of the choral song looks sloppy and unnecessary.

sweet - Jonas Schwartz - Theater Mania - ...read full review


Katie Buenneke

Bartlett accurately predicted the futility of Charles' gesture (suffice it to say things don't quite work out for him as he would have liked them to). The problem is that the world has changed rapidly since the play first opened in 2014 in the U.K. and in 2015 on Broadway. While it's a nice thought exercise to explore the hypothetical power of checks and balances when used as intended, it's hard for the play to seem like more than idle conjecture in 2017.

sweet-sour - Katie Buenneke - ...read full review


Dan Berkowitz

Given all this, a play titled "King Charles III" – a fantasy about what happens when Mummy finally does ascend to a heavenly throne and Charles claims his birthright – might conceivably have been written as a farce. But playwright Mike Bartlett chose instead to craft a serious meditation on principles, and how much one might choose to sacrifice to preserve them. In an intelligent, handsome production at the Pasadena Playhouse, director Michael Michetti and a large and splendid cast and crew provide the sort of sumptuous entertainment we see too little of in today's theatre. Hip Hip Hurrah!

sweet - Dan Berkowitz - The Los Angeles Post - ...read full review


Steven Stanley

As compelling and rewarding as it is daring and ambitious, King Charles III cements Mike Bartlett's reputation as one of England's finest young playwrights. Following Deaf West's groundbreakingly brilliant Our Town, the venerable Pasadena Playhouse is on one humdinger of a roll.

sweet - Steven Stanley - Stage Scene LA - ...read full review


Travis Michael Holder - Ticket Holders LA

Utilizing his dynamic cast of 16, director Michael Michetti, along with an amazing design team dominated by the incredibly detailed 100-plus costumes crafted by Alex Jaeger, manages to create a whole empire before us, filling the cavernous Pasadena Playhouse stage with constant movement and brilliantly conjured tricks in staging that keep the implausibility of the storyline from getting in the way of the vision.

sweet - Travis Michael Holder - TicketHolders LA - ...read full review


Avatar

This production is well-staged and well-paced. The actors are excellent at handling the verse, if not the British accents. The Royals have a very specific speech pattern and cadence that largely eludes the cast, and the lower-class accents are particularly general, uneven, and unconvincing.

sweet-sour - Samuel Garza Bernstein - Stage and Cinema - ...read full review


Avatar

Michael Michetti's staging doesn't oversell the drama. The iambic pentameter isn't delivered with percussive éclat but spoken with conversational formality. These larger-than-life figures are intimately approached. They actually seem not-too-distantly human.

sweet - Charles McNulty - LA Times - ...read full review


Avatar

The real beauty of this production lies, not only in the ensemble cast's talent, but also in the expertise of the creative team.

sweet - Jack and Lisa Lyons - Lyons, Views, News and Reviews - ...read full review


Avatar

Jim Abele carries the show as Charles, whose pride may cost him everything he's waited for. He exposes Charles' stubbornness, yet gives us a peek at his gentler side as well.

sweet - Julia Stier - USC Annenberg Media - ...read full review


Avatar

Michetti stages the actors with aplomb, treating them as pieces on a chessboard. Peter Bayne's original music lends a Gothic tension to the mood, aided by the Pasadena Master Chorale, but having the actors mouth the words of the choral song looks sloppy and unnecessary.

sweet - Jonas Schwartz - Theater Mania - ...read full review