Lear/Loman

Critics

LemonMeter

88 %

Reviews: 4

Audience

LemonMeter

Reviews: 1

Willy Loman crashes into King Lear’s tattered home in Purgatory where they examine the harsh realities of their lives. In this strange dwelling between Heaven and Hell, Lear has frequent and upsetting delusions of his Earthly life, while Loman watches the serious damage he caused his family in life and after his death. Is it too late to learn and to inspire change in those they love? [ 2Cents Theatre Group’s 2019 Best of INK @Fringe ]

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Reviews

"t seems that I saved one of the best shows of HFF19 for last, as Lear/Loman delivered on so many levels. Starting with the amazing script written by Kate Schwartz and directed by Scott Leggett, the acting was simply amazing and the show left a lasting impact on me, especially given what had happened to me during the weekend. Suffice it to say that this show is definitely in the top 10 and maybe even the top 5 of the over 600 shows I have reviewed at the Fringe, and I will never forget its impact. Leon Russom (Lear) and Bruno Oliver (Loman) turned in Tony-worthy performances, and were truly supported by Heather Roberts (Linda Loman), Tim Kopacz (Biff Loman), Reuben Uy (Happy Loman), Sarah Schulte (Regan) and Lauren Dewey (Goneril). It is no wonder this show won the Best of Ink Fest. It should be in permanent repertoire at the Broadwater, as I think this one will truly stand the test of time."

sweet - Bob Leggett - LA Music Critic - ...read full review


"Being familiar with both plays helped me to enjoy the confrontations and accept the resolution, because this play works on its own integrity. Bravo to playwright Kate Schwartz and director Scott Leggett."

sweet - Morna Murphy Martell - Theatre Spoken Here - ...read full review


"Stellar performances by two L.A. actor favorites, Leon Russom (Lear) and Bruno Oliver (Loman). Beautifully directed by Scott Leggett. Recommended"

sweet - Tracey Paleo - Gia On the Move - ...read full review


"The acting and knowledge of the source material was very solid, but I would be hesitant to recommend this show to anyone that isn't a hardcore lover of these plays. The whole cast was stellar, but of course, the titular Lear steals the show with Loman coming a close second. It was very clear that all involved had a deep love and knowledge of the source material and that shows. The connections Lear and Loman made with each other were really interesting and it was nice to see these characters who were never able to overcome their tragic flaws in life wrestle with doing so in death. But it was too much in love with the source material. In many ways, this felt like watching a theatre school comparative essay that was turned into a play. The analysis of the characters was spot on, but I couldn't connect to the show much deeper than on an intellectual level for most of the show. Lear explaining Iambic Pentameter to Willy Loman was an element that did not work for me. This show is very much for the theatre nerds, but that bit felt like it was going too far."

sweet-sour - Drew Petriello


"Russom is very much in command of and at ease with the character, and his frequent transitions from imperious anger to meek kindness are quite effective. Oliver is in good form as the blustery, deluded Loman, and the two actors bring considerable skill to bear upon the material. The enjoyment of this show derives mainly from watching these two performers interact."

sweet-sour - Terry Morgan - Stage Raw - ...read full review


"t seems that I saved one of the best shows of HFF19 for last, as Lear/Loman delivered on so many levels. Starting with the amazing script written by Kate Schwartz and directed by Scott Leggett, the acting was simply amazing and the show left a lasting impact on me, especially given what had happened to me during the weekend. Suffice it to say that this show is definitely in the top 10 and maybe even the top 5 of the over 600 shows I have reviewed at the Fringe, and I will never forget its impact. Leon Russom (Lear) and Bruno Oliver (Loman) turned in Tony-worthy performances, and were truly supported by Heather Roberts (Linda Loman), Tim Kopacz (Biff Loman), Reuben Uy (Happy Loman), Sarah Schulte (Regan) and Lauren Dewey (Goneril). It is no wonder this show won the Best of Ink Fest. It should be in permanent repertoire at the Broadwater, as I think this one will truly stand the test of time."

sweet - Bob Leggett - LA Music Critic - ...read full review


"Being familiar with both plays helped me to enjoy the confrontations and accept the resolution, because this play works on its own integrity. Bravo to playwright Kate Schwartz and director Scott Leggett."

sweet - Morna Murphy Martell - Theatre Spoken Here - ...read full review


"Stellar performances by two L.A. actor favorites, Leon Russom (Lear) and Bruno Oliver (Loman). Beautifully directed by Scott Leggett. Recommended"

sweet - Tracey Paleo - Gia On the Move - ...read full review


"Russom is very much in command of and at ease with the character, and his frequent transitions from imperious anger to meek kindness are quite effective. Oliver is in good form as the blustery, deluded Loman, and the two actors bring considerable skill to bear upon the material. The enjoyment of this show derives mainly from watching these two performers interact."

sweet-sour - Terry Morgan - Stage Raw - ...read full review


"The acting and knowledge of the source material was very solid, but I would be hesitant to recommend this show to anyone that isn't a hardcore lover of these plays. The whole cast was stellar, but of course, the titular Lear steals the show with Loman coming a close second. It was very clear that all involved had a deep love and knowledge of the source material and that shows. The connections Lear and Loman made with each other were really interesting and it was nice to see these characters who were never able to overcome their tragic flaws in life wrestle with doing so in death. But it was too much in love with the source material. In many ways, this felt like watching a theatre school comparative essay that was turned into a play. The analysis of the characters was spot on, but I couldn't connect to the show much deeper than on an intellectual level for most of the show. Lear explaining Iambic Pentameter to Willy Loman was an element that did not work for me. This show is very much for the theatre nerds, but that bit felt like it was going too far."

sweet-sour - Drew Petriello