Lord of the Lies

Critics

LemonMeter

Reviews: 2

Audience

LemonMeter

Reviews: 1

One man’s journey to the edge of the Flat Earth and back.

James Kirkland is looking for the truth in a world saturated with lies. His curiosity about the nature of the cosmos has led him down many rabbit holes: through the looking glass of hallucinogens, inside an ayahuasca sex cult and deep into the muck and mire of Youtube conspiracy videos. But in his search for answers he only discovers more questions. Like: Can you become addicted to having your mind blown? If we are spinning at 1000 miles an hour why can’t we feel it? Where is hell was the damn curve? How do you date on the flat, still plane(t)? Can a person who ‘trusts no one’ find that love is out there? Familial relationships become strained to the point that, for James, the only way out of The Flat Earth that he finds himself on, is by pushing himself all the way to the edge.

A one person show about one man who tries to save his very soul, before he succumbs to the LORD OF THE LIES.

Reviews

Monique LeBleu

James Kirkland's very funny and tightly written piece might not make you agree with his (once held?) Flat Earth theories, but you just might come to understand where some accepted truths can come into question when other lies are found close by. One could even say that if one had been involved in a sex cult that involved magic mushroom hallucinogens, becoming a flat-earther might not be a far climb. With mass information coming at us through our devices and from all sides—presidents shouting "Fake news!," Tsunami triggered nuclear meltdowns, magic bullet theories, and a daily deluge of other potential (and actual) conspiracies (“My Internet's down! I'm blocked out my emails! Am I hacked? Is it the Russians?” ) it's no wonder that were don't already believe that up is down, right is left, or right is wrong. A true strength in the piece is that, among everything, at the heart of Kirkland's pursuit of the truth is also a sincere search for real companionship. I'd see this show again because I feel like I'd catch a real nugget of wisdom I might have missed the first go around. Or perhaps to get the name of that mushroom again. (NO EXTERNAL STORY URL)

sweet - Monique LeBleu - LA Beat - ...read full review


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What I liked

I enjoyed the whole Ayahuasca experience. James is so energetic that he manages to take you on an acid trip inside his awakening. From the hilarity of his cultish experience to the several conspiracies he subscribes to, James just shows you the door. It’s up to you to cross it…

What I didn't like

I wish the climax would have been longer. I came to find out what shape is the Earth (as promised in the subtitle of the show). Instead I walked away with more questions that I already had before. Guess imma have to do my own research, won’t I?

My overall impression

If you came here looking for answers as to all your questions about the Flat Earth theory, you’ve come to the wrong place. What James Kirkland does is pose some questions and that he does masterfully. Besides, you can’t get a lecture in 45 minutes and you didn’t sign up to a Ted Talk, this is Fringe!

sweet - Victor Sotomayor


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Kirkland is an engaging and self-effacing raconteur who still has the remains of an intensity that you can well believe took him to some strange places. - RECOMMENDED

sweet - Guy Picot - Fringe Review UK - ...read full review


Monique LeBleu

James Kirkland's very funny and tightly written piece might not make you agree with his (once held?) Flat Earth theories, but you just might come to understand where some accepted truths can come into question when other lies are found close by. One could even say that if one had been involved in a sex cult that involved magic mushroom hallucinogens, becoming a flat-earther might not be a far climb. With mass information coming at us through our devices and from all sides—presidents shouting "Fake news!," Tsunami triggered nuclear meltdowns, magic bullet theories, and a daily deluge of other potential (and actual) conspiracies (“My Internet's down! I'm blocked out my emails! Am I hacked? Is it the Russians?” ) it's no wonder that were don't already believe that up is down, right is left, or right is wrong. A true strength in the piece is that, among everything, at the heart of Kirkland's pursuit of the truth is also a sincere search for real companionship. I'd see this show again because I feel like I'd catch a real nugget of wisdom I might have missed the first go around. Or perhaps to get the name of that mushroom again. (NO EXTERNAL STORY URL)

sweet - Monique LeBleu - LA Beat - ...read full review


Avatar

Kirkland is an engaging and self-effacing raconteur who still has the remains of an intensity that you can well believe took him to some strange places. - RECOMMENDED

sweet - Guy Picot - Fringe Review UK - ...read full review


Avatar

What I liked

I enjoyed the whole Ayahuasca experience. James is so energetic that he manages to take you on an acid trip inside his awakening. From the hilarity of his cultish experience to the several conspiracies he subscribes to, James just shows you the door. It’s up to you to cross it…

What I didn't like

I wish the climax would have been longer. I came to find out what shape is the Earth (as promised in the subtitle of the show). Instead I walked away with more questions that I already had before. Guess imma have to do my own research, won’t I?

My overall impression

If you came here looking for answers as to all your questions about the Flat Earth theory, you’ve come to the wrong place. What James Kirkland does is pose some questions and that he does masterfully. Besides, you can’t get a lecture in 45 minutes and you didn’t sign up to a Ted Talk, this is Fringe!

sweet - Victor Sotomayor