Octopi Wall Street

Critics

LemonMeter

Reviews: 0

Audience

LemonMeter

100 %

Reviews: 10

Octopi Wall Street addresses the subject of climate change through a series of vignettes told from the perspective of both human and non-human entities (think drunk birds, drag queen barley, algae and a glacier). The play is based on extensive research of main stream media articles dealing with off-beat aspects of global warming and climate change. The opening monologue of the play recently won a nationally recognized award at the Region 8 Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival as its 2019 Monologue Selection.

Use discount code WAY2HOT5 to get $3 off the regular ticket price of $15.

Reviews

Avatar

Octopi Wall Street is both an artful and humorous look at climate change. It really brings to the surface many issues that need to be addressed and allows the viewer to experience different perspectives on said issues, including from the perspective of nature itself. The script is well crafted and the humor and serious content combine for a very entertaining and thought provoking play.

sweet - Emma


Avatar

This isn’t just a great play, it is a great timely play. Climate change was recently called the biggest scientific problem facing mankind by MIT and this is the foundation of the play. However, it builds off this in a unique way with humor and pathos. Drunk birds, happy algae, and worried barley stalks figure in. Very intriguingly a glacier reflects on it’s past and future in a very surprising way. Masterfully written, it really makes you think.

sweet - Tim Casady


Avatar

An outright amazing performance, a well knit script, and a real experience on an issue that isn't always touched on. The scenes allow for many ways to interpret environmentalism becoming a personal and real issue. The poetic imagery expressed in humorous mannerisms helped digesting a serious issue in a welcoming and delightful way. The spin on this concept is hopeful because it shows that repairing such a split issue doesn't have to be so violent and dark. As well, the commentary at the end addressing the seriousness of this issue allows for the audience to feel the impending pressure to change and not just sit back and laugh. Overall, great show, great performance, and impeccable writing.

sweet - Phil B


Avatar

A campy take on climate change where mollusks, birds, algae, barley and glaciers have their say on how global warming affects them. Acted out in lovely vignettes that captures each character’s hilarious and poignant observations. My family attended the last performance and afterwards each of us voiced our favorite section, which truly highlights how this issue resonates differently. The writer’s multi-pronged approach using a variety of settings and visual cues gave both a global perspective and sense of personal calamity.

What I didn’t like:
Some theatrical choices were distracting and took away from the play. For example, in the scene where two academics discuss the situation over drinks, the focus of the action is on a server who keeps walking back and forth, in what evidently is a pun about tipping. One character's Russian accent was likewise an unfortunate choice, in an otherwise interesting exchange.

What I liked:
This play is a fresh approach on the subject by creatively focusing on a variety of environments and entities affected by the increase in global temperature. I was particularly intrigued with how each entity had a single voice distinctly their own and how the playwright infused commentary with witty dialogue. Visual elements like small, pink balloons, scuba equipment, vacuumed-packed dolls, videogame controllers, and overhead projection helped create a fun environment. The actors personified the characters enthusiastically, seamlessly going from comedic scene to serious discussion. The glacier’s soliloquy near the end was aptly grave. Final thoughts with the actors on stage out of character neatly reinjected the human element in this entertaining and campy production.

sweet - Rebeca


Avatar

What I liked
I loved the line in the play using “global warming” instead of the republican “climate change” which suggests this nightmare is just part of natural happenings. I appreciated the emphasis on “not here” so why worry?

What I didn't like
The play worked well. So glad you brought the info to me.

My overall impression
I am so glad we came the other night. The play is so innovative and the cause so essential. I just read an article in Time magazine about the efforts of Pacific island nations to unify the world in this urgency to rid us of coal, etc. They spearheaded the effort behind 2015 Paris Agreement. And, of course, “45” has withdrawn us from it. Fiji has already lost homes and land and will need to relocate 40 affected coastal villages. Did you see that article? I loved the line in the play using “global warming” instead of the republican “climate change” which suggests this nightmare is just part of natural happenings. I appreciated the emphasis on “not here” so why worry? So glad you brought the info to me.

sweet - Brenda Winter


Avatar

What I liked
The well written vignettes (one of the monologues won an award in the Kennedy Center’s Annual College Theater Festival) are made entertaining by the excellent direction of Susan Jagosz and the wonderful performances of the seven-member cast, all of whom play multiple roles. I especially enjoyed the acting of Kimberley Loftus, playing a television reporter, and David Adler, playing a policeman, discussing a problem with birds getting drunk on berries which were fermenting because of unusually warm weather. That so many politicians want to pretend that man-made global warming doesn’t exist is absurd makes it appropriate that Karen Bram Casady’s new play, “Octopi Wall Street” has many absurdist elements.

What I didn't like
I suggest slowing down the pace of the show. There were times when the wonderful words went by a bit too fast.

My overall impression
All of planet earth whether living or inanimate is effected by the changing climate be it a mollusk and its shell, a blade of barley, or a glacier. Through vignettes that bring to life various headlines about global warming, Octopi Wall Street makes a strong statement about the perils of not taking action to reduce man made climate change.

sweet - Janet Tunkle


Avatar

Having watched this production on opening and closing nights I can honestly say that my initial impression of the production remains the same. The foundation of any great production is the script, written by Karen Casady. She brings poignancy to a very important issue and mixes in humor throughout. It's interwoven so well that it never sounds preachy or slow.

Alongside the brilliant writing is the wonderful performances by all cast members. The whole production was just as great and funny the last show as it was the first show. A production with such a strong message just be seen by everyone and this is one of the better productions I have seen in a long time.

sweet - Cesar Osuna


Avatar

I loved this show! A play whose primary strength was its language--the writing was wonderful. The acting and directing was energetic and brought the concept and language of the play to the audience with verve and humor. An excellent play, overall.

sweet - Michael Bryson


Avatar

I absolutely loved this production. It was beautifully written; an intelligent, intellectual, hilarious, self-aware, and poignant snapshot of the far-reaching effects of climate change. I saw this show twice: on opening night and on closing night. From the first moment I heard the line “our smallness underpins immensity,” I knew the words would stay with me. The opening monologue and the closing remarks were just absolutely wonderful. This play is intelligence and intellectualism with a healthy dose of slap-stick thrown in for good measure.

Despite the clunky direction (the transitions between scenes were often uneven and disordered and the drunken birds scene, while hilarious, was difficult to hear because the actors were too loud and over-the-top in their performance), this show is a must-see and I really hope it will be expanded--I would love to spend more time with The Builder and The Glacier, both, as their characters really bring home the emotional impact of what this play is all about.

sweet - Modje


Avatar

Amazing! The writing is truly profound, poetic and real. The performances were inspiring and helped display this controversial issue on the stage.

sweet - Kari M Jacobs


Avatar

Octopi Wall Street is both an artful and humorous look at climate change. It really brings to the surface many issues that need to be addressed and allows the viewer to experience different perspectives on said issues, including from the perspective of nature itself. The script is well crafted and the humor and serious content combine for a very entertaining and thought provoking play.

sweet - Emma


Avatar

This isn’t just a great play, it is a great timely play. Climate change was recently called the biggest scientific problem facing mankind by MIT and this is the foundation of the play. However, it builds off this in a unique way with humor and pathos. Drunk birds, happy algae, and worried barley stalks figure in. Very intriguingly a glacier reflects on it’s past and future in a very surprising way. Masterfully written, it really makes you think.

sweet - Tim Casady


Avatar

An outright amazing performance, a well knit script, and a real experience on an issue that isn't always touched on. The scenes allow for many ways to interpret environmentalism becoming a personal and real issue. The poetic imagery expressed in humorous mannerisms helped digesting a serious issue in a welcoming and delightful way. The spin on this concept is hopeful because it shows that repairing such a split issue doesn't have to be so violent and dark. As well, the commentary at the end addressing the seriousness of this issue allows for the audience to feel the impending pressure to change and not just sit back and laugh. Overall, great show, great performance, and impeccable writing.

sweet - Phil B


Avatar

A campy take on climate change where mollusks, birds, algae, barley and glaciers have their say on how global warming affects them. Acted out in lovely vignettes that captures each character’s hilarious and poignant observations. My family attended the last performance and afterwards each of us voiced our favorite section, which truly highlights how this issue resonates differently. The writer’s multi-pronged approach using a variety of settings and visual cues gave both a global perspective and sense of personal calamity.

What I didn’t like:
Some theatrical choices were distracting and took away from the play. For example, in the scene where two academics discuss the situation over drinks, the focus of the action is on a server who keeps walking back and forth, in what evidently is a pun about tipping. One character's Russian accent was likewise an unfortunate choice, in an otherwise interesting exchange.

What I liked:
This play is a fresh approach on the subject by creatively focusing on a variety of environments and entities affected by the increase in global temperature. I was particularly intrigued with how each entity had a single voice distinctly their own and how the playwright infused commentary with witty dialogue. Visual elements like small, pink balloons, scuba equipment, vacuumed-packed dolls, videogame controllers, and overhead projection helped create a fun environment. The actors personified the characters enthusiastically, seamlessly going from comedic scene to serious discussion. The glacier’s soliloquy near the end was aptly grave. Final thoughts with the actors on stage out of character neatly reinjected the human element in this entertaining and campy production.

sweet - Rebeca


Avatar

What I liked
I loved the line in the play using “global warming” instead of the republican “climate change” which suggests this nightmare is just part of natural happenings. I appreciated the emphasis on “not here” so why worry?

What I didn't like
The play worked well. So glad you brought the info to me.

My overall impression
I am so glad we came the other night. The play is so innovative and the cause so essential. I just read an article in Time magazine about the efforts of Pacific island nations to unify the world in this urgency to rid us of coal, etc. They spearheaded the effort behind 2015 Paris Agreement. And, of course, “45” has withdrawn us from it. Fiji has already lost homes and land and will need to relocate 40 affected coastal villages. Did you see that article? I loved the line in the play using “global warming” instead of the republican “climate change” which suggests this nightmare is just part of natural happenings. I appreciated the emphasis on “not here” so why worry? So glad you brought the info to me.

sweet - Brenda Winter


Avatar

What I liked
The well written vignettes (one of the monologues won an award in the Kennedy Center’s Annual College Theater Festival) are made entertaining by the excellent direction of Susan Jagosz and the wonderful performances of the seven-member cast, all of whom play multiple roles. I especially enjoyed the acting of Kimberley Loftus, playing a television reporter, and David Adler, playing a policeman, discussing a problem with birds getting drunk on berries which were fermenting because of unusually warm weather. That so many politicians want to pretend that man-made global warming doesn’t exist is absurd makes it appropriate that Karen Bram Casady’s new play, “Octopi Wall Street” has many absurdist elements.

What I didn't like
I suggest slowing down the pace of the show. There were times when the wonderful words went by a bit too fast.

My overall impression
All of planet earth whether living or inanimate is effected by the changing climate be it a mollusk and its shell, a blade of barley, or a glacier. Through vignettes that bring to life various headlines about global warming, Octopi Wall Street makes a strong statement about the perils of not taking action to reduce man made climate change.

sweet - Janet Tunkle


Avatar

Having watched this production on opening and closing nights I can honestly say that my initial impression of the production remains the same. The foundation of any great production is the script, written by Karen Casady. She brings poignancy to a very important issue and mixes in humor throughout. It's interwoven so well that it never sounds preachy or slow.

Alongside the brilliant writing is the wonderful performances by all cast members. The whole production was just as great and funny the last show as it was the first show. A production with such a strong message just be seen by everyone and this is one of the better productions I have seen in a long time.

sweet - Cesar Osuna


Avatar

I loved this show! A play whose primary strength was its language--the writing was wonderful. The acting and directing was energetic and brought the concept and language of the play to the audience with verve and humor. An excellent play, overall.

sweet - Michael Bryson


Avatar

I absolutely loved this production. It was beautifully written; an intelligent, intellectual, hilarious, self-aware, and poignant snapshot of the far-reaching effects of climate change. I saw this show twice: on opening night and on closing night. From the first moment I heard the line “our smallness underpins immensity,” I knew the words would stay with me. The opening monologue and the closing remarks were just absolutely wonderful. This play is intelligence and intellectualism with a healthy dose of slap-stick thrown in for good measure.

Despite the clunky direction (the transitions between scenes were often uneven and disordered and the drunken birds scene, while hilarious, was difficult to hear because the actors were too loud and over-the-top in their performance), this show is a must-see and I really hope it will be expanded--I would love to spend more time with The Builder and The Glacier, both, as their characters really bring home the emotional impact of what this play is all about.

sweet - Modje


Avatar

Amazing! The writing is truly profound, poetic and real. The performances were inspiring and helped display this controversial issue on the stage.

sweet - Kari M Jacobs