Plunge by Tom Jacobson

Critics

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90 %

Reviews: 5

Audience

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Reviews: 0

DARK SECRETS BUBBLE TO THE SURFACE Two strangers — one a priest, the other a noted art historian — share a surreal confession at LA's “exclusive” Bimini Baths, circa 1918. Years before, an immigrant boy drowned under mysterious circumstances. But whose crime was it, really? Playwright Tom Jacobson brings his formal inventiveness and vivid imagination to The Ballad of Bimini Baths, a trilogy of new plays following the ripples of a hushed-up crime across a half-century of LA history. In an unprecedented intimate theatre event, the three plays will be presented simultaneously at Son of Semele, Rogue Machine and Playwrights Arena. To purchase a discounted Trilogy Pass, visit www.BiminiTrilogy.com

Reviews

Rob Stevens
"Jacobson has created a surreal encounter between two real life characters...Jacobson has written a terrifically involving tale that grabs its audience's attention and never lets go of it. Plunge is part history lesson, part mystery, all engrossing."

sweet - Rob Stevens - Haines His Way - ...read full review


Steven Stanley
"As both stand-alone production and one certain to inspire interest in following Mexican-American immigrant Zenobio Remedios's journey from childhood to his thirties and forties in The Bimini Baths Trilogy's concluding chapters, Plunge will have you on the edge of your seat from its intriguing start to its heart-rending finish."

sweet - Steven Stanley - Stage Scene LA - ...read full review


Eric A Gordon
"Maxwell, a renowned curator at the then fairly new Los Angeles County Museum of History, Science and Art (now known as LACMA), is also a leader at his local YMCA (pace Village People!), where he has access to young boys on field trips and excursions. Reynolds is a Roman Catholic priest who struggles with suicidal thoughts over his own peccadillos with the young churchgoers in his charge. Both are severely damaged men, whom Jacobson treats gingerly, revealing how they themselves suffered abuse, while not excusing their actions. The playwright brings in the views and practices of “alienists” (an older word for psychiatrists), and of sexual theorists such as Richard von Krafft-Ebing and Dr. Magnus Hirschfeld by way of communicating the then-current understanding of such outlier behavior."

sweet - Eric A Gordon - ...read full review


Ellen Dostal
"Just when you think you know where this story is going, everything turns on a dime. Tom Jacobson's writing is full of enough twists to rival any popular whodunit with a narrative that includes real characters, and a location prominent in Los Angeles history..."

sweet - Ellen Dostal - BroadwayWorld Los Angeles - ...read full review


Avatar
"Director Matthew McCray gets great work from his actors and manages to keep up with the script's frequent shifts in time, which is no small feat. Jacobson has created an intricate puzzle of a play, a matryoshka doll where one truth lays nested within another, only to find another nested within that. The downside of this is that, while the work is clever, it's also unnecessarily confusing."

sweet-sour - Terry Morgan - Stage Raw - ...read full review


Rob Stevens
"Jacobson has created a surreal encounter between two real life characters...Jacobson has written a terrifically involving tale that grabs its audience's attention and never lets go of it. Plunge is part history lesson, part mystery, all engrossing."

sweet - Rob Stevens - Haines His Way - ...read full review


Steven Stanley
"As both stand-alone production and one certain to inspire interest in following Mexican-American immigrant Zenobio Remedios's journey from childhood to his thirties and forties in The Bimini Baths Trilogy's concluding chapters, Plunge will have you on the edge of your seat from its intriguing start to its heart-rending finish."

sweet - Steven Stanley - Stage Scene LA - ...read full review


Eric A Gordon
"Maxwell, a renowned curator at the then fairly new Los Angeles County Museum of History, Science and Art (now known as LACMA), is also a leader at his local YMCA (pace Village People!), where he has access to young boys on field trips and excursions. Reynolds is a Roman Catholic priest who struggles with suicidal thoughts over his own peccadillos with the young churchgoers in his charge. Both are severely damaged men, whom Jacobson treats gingerly, revealing how they themselves suffered abuse, while not excusing their actions. The playwright brings in the views and practices of “alienists” (an older word for psychiatrists), and of sexual theorists such as Richard von Krafft-Ebing and Dr. Magnus Hirschfeld by way of communicating the then-current understanding of such outlier behavior."

sweet - Eric A Gordon - ...read full review


Ellen Dostal
"Just when you think you know where this story is going, everything turns on a dime. Tom Jacobson's writing is full of enough twists to rival any popular whodunit with a narrative that includes real characters, and a location prominent in Los Angeles history..."

sweet - Ellen Dostal - BroadwayWorld Los Angeles - ...read full review


Avatar
"Director Matthew McCray gets great work from his actors and manages to keep up with the script's frequent shifts in time, which is no small feat. Jacobson has created an intricate puzzle of a play, a matryoshka doll where one truth lays nested within another, only to find another nested within that. The downside of this is that, while the work is clever, it's also unnecessarily confusing."

sweet-sour - Terry Morgan - Stage Raw - ...read full review