RED INK

Critics

LemonMeter

93 %

Reviews: 7

Audience

LemonMeter

Reviews: 0

RED INK is an absurdist satire that looks at the corrosive pressures of click-bait journalism and cut-throat competition on newspapers around the country, as they struggle to report the truth in a post-fact world. It is a funny, often biting, brand new play about the plight of local newspapers, which follows a journalist who is hired by new management to run the paper he has been working for, and loves. In the wake of a corporate merger. Can he keep the standards he aspires to? Can he keep his family and friends? His sanity?

Reviews

Leigh Kennicott

I can’t rave enough about Steven Leigh Morris’ new play, Red Ink,. His play demonstrates how aburdism best expresses the distress – no, anguish – that attends an inexorable extinction of a printable instrument of Democracy. Jerome (a magnificent Leo Marks) is an enthusiastic entertainment writer and editor, who struggles to “keep his head when everyone is losing theirs and blaming it on him,” to quote Rudyard Kipling. Through the deft manipulation of management, Jerome winds up becoming the agent of his own paper’s demise. Peter Van Norden serves as a touching tribute to the rumpled columnists of the by-gone days. Ultimately, this play becomes a gripping paen to independent journalism.

sweet - Leigh Kennicott - ShowMag - ...read full review


Avatar

This is small theater at its best. Visually, a lot is created out of a little, and much of the audience, capped at a capacity of 50, sits within inches of the action.

Morris, who went on to found the digital journal Stage Raw, artfully blends the worlds of journalism and theater. It’ll be hard to forget the images he’s created or such incisive lines as a newspaper owner’s chilling assessment that America “can’t even agree on what a fact is anymore.”

sweet - Daryl H. Miller - LA Times - ...read full review


Avatar

Morris is an acute and very smart writer, and he knows this most important subject well. Yet even as it compels, this script feels like a first draft with a positively incongruous denouement. And if it sounds a bit complicated and dense, it is: Psychodrama, breaking the fourth wall, a memory play-within-a-play, imaginary people, and other meta-theatrics don’t always support the emotional core. Still, some scenes positively crackle: A devastating argument between Jerome and his wife elucidates his manic need for integrity, even at the cost of a marriage, and a heartbreaking scene in which Jerome is forced to lay off a long-time music critic highlights Jerome’s powerlessness.

sweet-sour - Tony Frankel - Stage and Cinema - ...read full review


Mark Hein

Don't-miss theatre. A fierce, funny elegy for America's newspapers, in which Steven Leigh Morris (a recovering journalist) hits his stride as a playwright. Led by master actor Leo Marks and a remarkable company, RED INK takes us on a whirlwind ride through a former editor's attempt to tell his tale as a therapeutic play in a mental clinic. Sharply and deeply written, exquisitely performed, and smartly produced, this timely satire looks ready to ravel to bigger venues.

sweet - Mark Hein - Theatre Ghost - ...read full review


Travis Michael Holder - Ticket Holders LA

Steven Leigh Morris’ personal new play is beyond simply a biting, often hilarious, on-the-money treatise laying bare the immorality of corporate greed. It echoes everything wrong as our society and its “leaders” step over us all while cavalierly destroying everything we should be desperately holding dear. We need such courageous and thought-provoking artistic expression more than ever if we are going to get through this discouraging period in our existence.

sweet - Travis Michael Holder - Ticket Holders LA - ...read full review


Avatar

Both types of red ink come into play as this new work sharply tackles the institutional and personal travails confronting newspapers and those who work in the field. The action swings from satire to sacrifice with poignant moments and a surprising number of chuckles, as Jerome (Leo Marks), the editor of an alternative weekly newspaper, struggles to hold on to his increasingly shredded integrity and deteriorating sanity. - RECOMMENDED

sweet - Ann Haskins - Stage Raw - ...read full review


Steven Stanley

What’s been happening to print journalism since the Internet took control could drive a newspaper person crazy, or so a certain alternative press reporter discovers quite literally in Steven Leigh Morris’s brand new play Red Ink, the exciting, adventurous latest from Playwrights’ Arena.

sweet - Steven Stanley - StageSceneLA - ...read full review


Leigh Kennicott

I can’t rave enough about Steven Leigh Morris’ new play, Red Ink,. His play demonstrates how aburdism best expresses the distress – no, anguish – that attends an inexorable extinction of a printable instrument of Democracy. Jerome (a magnificent Leo Marks) is an enthusiastic entertainment writer and editor, who struggles to “keep his head when everyone is losing theirs and blaming it on him,” to quote Rudyard Kipling. Through the deft manipulation of management, Jerome winds up becoming the agent of his own paper’s demise. Peter Van Norden serves as a touching tribute to the rumpled columnists of the by-gone days. Ultimately, this play becomes a gripping paen to independent journalism.

sweet - Leigh Kennicott - ShowMag - ...read full review


Avatar

This is small theater at its best. Visually, a lot is created out of a little, and much of the audience, capped at a capacity of 50, sits within inches of the action.

Morris, who went on to found the digital journal Stage Raw, artfully blends the worlds of journalism and theater. It’ll be hard to forget the images he’s created or such incisive lines as a newspaper owner’s chilling assessment that America “can’t even agree on what a fact is anymore.”

sweet - Daryl H. Miller - LA Times - ...read full review


Avatar

Morris is an acute and very smart writer, and he knows this most important subject well. Yet even as it compels, this script feels like a first draft with a positively incongruous denouement. And if it sounds a bit complicated and dense, it is: Psychodrama, breaking the fourth wall, a memory play-within-a-play, imaginary people, and other meta-theatrics don’t always support the emotional core. Still, some scenes positively crackle: A devastating argument between Jerome and his wife elucidates his manic need for integrity, even at the cost of a marriage, and a heartbreaking scene in which Jerome is forced to lay off a long-time music critic highlights Jerome’s powerlessness.

sweet-sour - Tony Frankel - Stage and Cinema - ...read full review


Mark Hein

Don't-miss theatre. A fierce, funny elegy for America's newspapers, in which Steven Leigh Morris (a recovering journalist) hits his stride as a playwright. Led by master actor Leo Marks and a remarkable company, RED INK takes us on a whirlwind ride through a former editor's attempt to tell his tale as a therapeutic play in a mental clinic. Sharply and deeply written, exquisitely performed, and smartly produced, this timely satire looks ready to ravel to bigger venues.

sweet - Mark Hein - Theatre Ghost - ...read full review


Travis Michael Holder - Ticket Holders LA

Steven Leigh Morris’ personal new play is beyond simply a biting, often hilarious, on-the-money treatise laying bare the immorality of corporate greed. It echoes everything wrong as our society and its “leaders” step over us all while cavalierly destroying everything we should be desperately holding dear. We need such courageous and thought-provoking artistic expression more than ever if we are going to get through this discouraging period in our existence.

sweet - Travis Michael Holder - Ticket Holders LA - ...read full review


Avatar

Both types of red ink come into play as this new work sharply tackles the institutional and personal travails confronting newspapers and those who work in the field. The action swings from satire to sacrifice with poignant moments and a surprising number of chuckles, as Jerome (Leo Marks), the editor of an alternative weekly newspaper, struggles to hold on to his increasingly shredded integrity and deteriorating sanity. - RECOMMENDED

sweet - Ann Haskins - Stage Raw - ...read full review


Steven Stanley

What’s been happening to print journalism since the Internet took control could drive a newspaper person crazy, or so a certain alternative press reporter discovers quite literally in Steven Leigh Morris’s brand new play Red Ink, the exciting, adventurous latest from Playwrights’ Arena.

sweet - Steven Stanley - StageSceneLA - ...read full review