Revolutions/Revoluciones

Critics

LemonMeter

75 %

Reviews: 4

Audience

LemonMeter

Reviews: 0

A highly theatrical fever-dream that employs magical realism to tell the kaleidoscope journey of a strong and passionate woman facing an impossible tragedy. A desperate mother searches for her disappeared son amidst a totalitarian regime in an unnamed Latin American country. Produced by the Latino Theater Company in association with Mexico's Foro Shakespeare, an independent non-profit space that generates and develops projects of direct social impact through the performing arts. Presented in Spanish with English supertitles. April 20 – May 12 at The Los Angeles Theatre Center, 514 S. Spring St., Los Angeles, CA 90013; $24- $38; For reservations and information, call (866) 811-4111 or go to www.thelatc.org.

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Reviews

"The country isn't mentioned, and it's not necessary, no specifics are required to feel the hope and pain of people inspired to make a better world, only to be forced to live with the high price of change."

sweet - Carol Edger Germain - Colorado Boulevard - ...read full review


Patrick Chavis
"The audience is thrust into an interesting, intense physical performance but the surreal story aspects of the play fight with the narrative instead of enhancing the story."

sweet-sour - Patrick Chavis - LA Theatre Bites - ...read full review


Leigh Kennicott
"In LATC's intimate Avalos Theatre, Elaine Romero's tone-poetry unfolds a story at once iconic and specific, treating of Latin American revolutions writ large. Performed in Spanish with English sub-titles, Romero's simply structured play sheds light on the process that occurs again and again, always re-enacting an “amnesia of violence.” Director Bruno Bishir from Foro Shakespearein Mexico City picks up Romero's lyrical repetitions, and the movement, by choreographer Olga Sokolova, accents a counter-tempo. The actors – Hasiff Fadul as the dictator, Oscar; his former lover, Pilar (Corina Vela) and Miguel (Javier Balderas), the son he never knew –create their own soundscapes lending the piece a grotesque air that takes us from the Afterlife to Real Life and beyond—to memory. Romero's conception rings through clearly: the amnesia of violence demands that would-be reformers become the very dictators they protest."

sweet - Leigh Kennicott - ShowMag - ...read full review


Deborah Klugman
"All three performers — but especially the pivotal Vela with her reservoir of vocal power — display presence and skill, but they are given little opportunity to humanize their roles or redesign them as something other than vehicles for the play's larger message about the ubiquity of brutality and betrayal."

sweet-sour - Deborah Klugman - Stage Raw - ...read full review


"The country isn't mentioned, and it's not necessary, no specifics are required to feel the hope and pain of people inspired to make a better world, only to be forced to live with the high price of change."

sweet - Carol Edger Germain - Colorado Boulevard - ...read full review


Patrick Chavis
"The audience is thrust into an interesting, intense physical performance but the surreal story aspects of the play fight with the narrative instead of enhancing the story."

sweet-sour - Patrick Chavis - LA Theatre Bites - ...read full review


Leigh Kennicott
"In LATC's intimate Avalos Theatre, Elaine Romero's tone-poetry unfolds a story at once iconic and specific, treating of Latin American revolutions writ large. Performed in Spanish with English sub-titles, Romero's simply structured play sheds light on the process that occurs again and again, always re-enacting an “amnesia of violence.” Director Bruno Bishir from Foro Shakespearein Mexico City picks up Romero's lyrical repetitions, and the movement, by choreographer Olga Sokolova, accents a counter-tempo. The actors – Hasiff Fadul as the dictator, Oscar; his former lover, Pilar (Corina Vela) and Miguel (Javier Balderas), the son he never knew –create their own soundscapes lending the piece a grotesque air that takes us from the Afterlife to Real Life and beyond—to memory. Romero's conception rings through clearly: the amnesia of violence demands that would-be reformers become the very dictators they protest."

sweet - Leigh Kennicott - ShowMag - ...read full review


Deborah Klugman
"All three performers — but especially the pivotal Vela with her reservoir of vocal power — display presence and skill, but they are given little opportunity to humanize their roles or redesign them as something other than vehicles for the play's larger message about the ubiquity of brutality and betrayal."

sweet-sour - Deborah Klugman - Stage Raw - ...read full review