Separate Tables

Critics

LemonMeter

86 %

Reviews: 7

Audience

LemonMeter

Reviews: 0

Separate Tables is actually a compilation of two short plays. The two pieces share a location, a dining room in a residential hotel in Bournemouth, England, and also share some of the same characters. In the first act, Table by the Window, an alcoholic left-wing writer loves the female manger of the hotel. Their world is rocked when the man's ex-wife, a glamorous model dreading the approach of her middle age, checks into the hotel. The model has her ex in her sights. What will he do? In the second act, Table Number Seven, an ex-Army man enjoys the company of a spinster. They have things in common: Both are afraid of life and of other people in particular. When the woman's manipulative, domineering mother exposes the man's hidden sins, will she succeed in driving the soldier and the spinster apart?

Reviews

Steven Stanley

There's probably no L.A. theater company more adept at period pieces than Theatre 40. A dated play and some less-than-ideal casting choices make Separate Tables the disappointing exception.

sour - Steven Stanley - Stage Scene LA - ...read full review


Lorenzo Marchessi

“Story Driven – Character Strong – Theatre 40's “Separate Tables” Is Gripping!”

THE GEEK AUTHORITY - By Lorenzo Marchessi

It's 1958 and at the Beauregard Hotel in England which is a place where certain people like to return to and others just like to be part of, “Separate Tables” at Theatre 40 in Beverly Hills is a play that is layered with personalities, problems and surprises you'll not see coming. “Separate Tables” made its actual debut in London in 1954 and eventually made its way to Broadway where it was nominated for the Tony award in 1957. It's engaging. It's got a slower pace at first – but as the information is discovered, you will become more and more entranced into where every character is going.

Produced by David Hunt Stafford and directed by Jules Aaron, the play has some unusual staging. There are literally seats in the audience where either you are trying to peer around furniture or staring at the performer's backs. The blocking was slightly awkward. However the focus is clearly on the characters which made for some of the most of the exciting dramatic moments.

Written by Sir Terence Rattigan, “Separate Tables” is actually a mash-up of two short plays where they share a location which is a dining room in a residential hotel in Bournemouth, England. Coincidently they also share some of the same characters as well.

sweet - Lorenzo Marchessi - The Geek Authority - ...read full review


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It features a rather powerful cast of players...

sweet - Rich Borowy - ...read full review


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The stage version of Separate Tables is a poignant, provocative and moving tale and is actually  2 short plays combined taking place in a charming inn set in Bournemouth England in the early 1950s.

sweet - Harrison Held - ...read full review


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This is perhaps the most ambitious production I've seen at Theatre 40 in Beverly Hills in the almost two and a half years that I've been reviewing plays there.  And they pulled it off beautifully.

sweet - Karen Salkin - ...read full review


Don Grigware

Most remember the 1958 film, but characters were served better in the play version that, although dated, provides an elegant and emotionally charged portrait of 1950s morality in Great Britain. Theatre 40 has a superb cast under the stellar direction of Jules Aaron.

sweet - Don Grigware - BroadwayWorld.com - ...read full review


Rob Stevens

The 1950s were a very different time from today but that world is wonderfully recreated by director Aaron and his talented cast. Rattigan's writing is slow, gracious, very civilized and involving. He has created some wonderful characters and this cast artfully brings them to life, imperfections and all...Separate Tables is rarely produced so if you enjoy good solid old-fashioned theatre, don't miss this rare treat.

sweet - Rob Stevens - Haines His Way - ...read full review


Steven Stanley

There's probably no L.A. theater company more adept at period pieces than Theatre 40. A dated play and some less-than-ideal casting choices make Separate Tables the disappointing exception.

sour - Steven Stanley - Stage Scene LA - ...read full review


Lorenzo Marchessi

“Story Driven – Character Strong – Theatre 40's “Separate Tables” Is Gripping!”

THE GEEK AUTHORITY - By Lorenzo Marchessi

It's 1958 and at the Beauregard Hotel in England which is a place where certain people like to return to and others just like to be part of, “Separate Tables” at Theatre 40 in Beverly Hills is a play that is layered with personalities, problems and surprises you'll not see coming. “Separate Tables” made its actual debut in London in 1954 and eventually made its way to Broadway where it was nominated for the Tony award in 1957. It's engaging. It's got a slower pace at first – but as the information is discovered, you will become more and more entranced into where every character is going.

Produced by David Hunt Stafford and directed by Jules Aaron, the play has some unusual staging. There are literally seats in the audience where either you are trying to peer around furniture or staring at the performer's backs. The blocking was slightly awkward. However the focus is clearly on the characters which made for some of the most of the exciting dramatic moments.

Written by Sir Terence Rattigan, “Separate Tables” is actually a mash-up of two short plays where they share a location which is a dining room in a residential hotel in Bournemouth, England. Coincidently they also share some of the same characters as well.

sweet - Lorenzo Marchessi - The Geek Authority - ...read full review


Avatar

It features a rather powerful cast of players...

sweet - Rich Borowy - ...read full review


Avatar

The stage version of Separate Tables is a poignant, provocative and moving tale and is actually  2 short plays combined taking place in a charming inn set in Bournemouth England in the early 1950s.

sweet - Harrison Held - ...read full review


Avatar

This is perhaps the most ambitious production I've seen at Theatre 40 in Beverly Hills in the almost two and a half years that I've been reviewing plays there.  And they pulled it off beautifully.

sweet - Karen Salkin - ...read full review


Don Grigware

Most remember the 1958 film, but characters were served better in the play version that, although dated, provides an elegant and emotionally charged portrait of 1950s morality in Great Britain. Theatre 40 has a superb cast under the stellar direction of Jules Aaron.

sweet - Don Grigware - BroadwayWorld.com - ...read full review


Rob Stevens

The 1950s were a very different time from today but that world is wonderfully recreated by director Aaron and his talented cast. Rattigan's writing is slow, gracious, very civilized and involving. He has created some wonderful characters and this cast artfully brings them to life, imperfections and all...Separate Tables is rarely produced so if you enjoy good solid old-fashioned theatre, don't miss this rare treat.

sweet - Rob Stevens - Haines His Way - ...read full review