SHREK THE MUSICAL

Critics

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100 %

Reviews: 4

Audience

LemonMeter

Reviews: 0

The Tony Award-winning musical based on the 2001 Dreamworks film, Shrek, is coming to the Civic Arts Plaza stage for the first time ever… after! With animated songs by Jeanine Tesori and comical lyrics by David Lindsay-Abaire, fairy tales will be coming true at 5-Star Theatricals!

Reviews

Joan Alperin
"The show has something for everyone. It's hysterically funny, with whimsical puppetry, high-energy dance numbers and dazzling sets. It also has a beautiful message about acceptance in one of the show's best numbers, “Freak Flag.” The whole cast is great. This is definitely a show for people of all ages. Don't miss it."

sweet - Joan Alperin - Better Lemons - ...read full review


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"The show's delightful fairy tale characters make for one of Broadway's most bizarre chorus lines, highlighted by terrific voice characterizations like Julia Lester as Gingy and Kyle Frattini as Pinocchio."

sweet - Cary Ginell - Moorpark Acorn - ...read full review


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"In summary, this was a show that entertained the kiddies at one level, with the storytale antics and fart jokes of the original. But for the adults, it was something that transcended the original Broadway production. It brought a level of self-awareness of what it was, with an undercurrent of political meaning, that adults would pick up on. As such, it was very very enjoyable."

sweet - Daniel Faigin - CA Highways - ...read full review


Eric A Gordon
"Only by wit, mutual acceptance and solidarity can the characters unite to turn back the malevolent force of the Farquaads of the world and overcome their fears. These fairy tale people—like the children in the audience—finally have the opportunity to escape the imposed societal narrative they've been handed, of being a failed version of who they were meant to become. The musical contains so many important themes for young people—for everyone, in fact—to think about. Try not to judge people you don't know. Imagine yourself in the part you'd like to play in life. Don't erect walls around you, or around others. Voice your thoughts and feelings. There are times when an apology is in order; and also times for forgiveness. The song “I Think I Got You Beat” has Shrek and Fiona trying to outdo each other's abandonment story—a kind of “Oppression Olympics” number—and they wind up bonding over the reality that they both belch and fart like everyone else, though louder and smellier, of course, 'cuz they're ogres. Kids can learn not to feel shame over normal bodily functions. Beauty and happiness are not always how they're depicted in fairy tales: It's OK to be an ogre. As Pinocchio puts it, “I'm wood, I'm good, get used to it”—a good example of how concepts can be conveyed that contain appropriate meanings for different age groups in the same audience."

sweet - Eric A Gordon - People's World - ...read full review


Joan Alperin
"The show has something for everyone. It's hysterically funny, with whimsical puppetry, high-energy dance numbers and dazzling sets. It also has a beautiful message about acceptance in one of the show's best numbers, “Freak Flag.” The whole cast is great. This is definitely a show for people of all ages. Don't miss it."

sweet - Joan Alperin - Better Lemons - ...read full review


Avatar
"The show's delightful fairy tale characters make for one of Broadway's most bizarre chorus lines, highlighted by terrific voice characterizations like Julia Lester as Gingy and Kyle Frattini as Pinocchio."

sweet - Cary Ginell - Moorpark Acorn - ...read full review


Avatar
"In summary, this was a show that entertained the kiddies at one level, with the storytale antics and fart jokes of the original. But for the adults, it was something that transcended the original Broadway production. It brought a level of self-awareness of what it was, with an undercurrent of political meaning, that adults would pick up on. As such, it was very very enjoyable."

sweet - Daniel Faigin - CA Highways - ...read full review


Eric A Gordon
"Only by wit, mutual acceptance and solidarity can the characters unite to turn back the malevolent force of the Farquaads of the world and overcome their fears. These fairy tale people—like the children in the audience—finally have the opportunity to escape the imposed societal narrative they've been handed, of being a failed version of who they were meant to become. The musical contains so many important themes for young people—for everyone, in fact—to think about. Try not to judge people you don't know. Imagine yourself in the part you'd like to play in life. Don't erect walls around you, or around others. Voice your thoughts and feelings. There are times when an apology is in order; and also times for forgiveness. The song “I Think I Got You Beat” has Shrek and Fiona trying to outdo each other's abandonment story—a kind of “Oppression Olympics” number—and they wind up bonding over the reality that they both belch and fart like everyone else, though louder and smellier, of course, 'cuz they're ogres. Kids can learn not to feel shame over normal bodily functions. Beauty and happiness are not always how they're depicted in fairy tales: It's OK to be an ogre. As Pinocchio puts it, “I'm wood, I'm good, get used to it”—a good example of how concepts can be conveyed that contain appropriate meanings for different age groups in the same audience."

sweet - Eric A Gordon - People's World - ...read full review