Silent Joy, a New Play

Critics

LemonMeter

100 %

Reviews: 3

Audience

LemonMeter

Reviews: 1

Adapted from an upcoming graphic novel, Silent Joy tells the story of a girl trapped by her own demons who decides to help a kind, mute boy named Joy whose mouth is sewn shut. Together they set out on an epic journey, facing otherworldly perils, to seek revenge on the person that inflicted this abuse on Joy. In the end, the girl must face her darkest memories to find redemption for her friend and discover the truth about herself.

A modern narrative inspired by the classic quest story, Dante's "Inferno", Silent Joy is an enthralling tale of friendship and forgiveness that at once deals with the messiness of humanity and contemplates the reasons for existence.

For more info: Silentjoytheplay.com

Reviews

Avatar

Inspired by Dante’s Inferno and adapted from the graphic novel by Zach Beckert, the stage version was written by Melissa Ordaz, with musical score composed by Matt Ordaz. Maggie Dorfman and John Michael Logie were magical in the lead roles, taking us through every emotion available to lead us to the goal. The supporting players were led by Carolina Reynoso as the young girl, Ramzi Kelley as the mother, Joshua Lopez as the father and Christopher Flores as the brother. Additional support came from Brian Bautista, Aaron Griffin, Janette, Valenzo and Megan Walker. In addition, Matt Ordaz (xylophone and percussion) and Chrissy Johnson (cello) underscored the show with music that made a difference. You will be changed by this show. Hats off to NAMI (National Alliance on Mental Illness) for their support and for being there.

sweet - Bob Leggett - LA Music Critic - ...read full review


Avatar

...I must commend the director Melissa Ordaz and the entire production team for their approach to tackling this most onerous subject matter. From start to finish the audience is taken on an emotional tidal wave, using movement, dance and music to weave beautiful and haunting scenes from past to present, giving it an almost cinematic quality. The intricate choreography, which could almost be considered a character on its own, keeps the audience fully engaged. With scenes happening simultaneously, there is always something to feast your eyes on.

sweet - Elisa Hoyos - NoHo Arts District - ...read full review


Avatar

The performances are stellar - Maggie Dorfman is a fantastic anchor for the rest of the cast to revolve around. All the members of her family are very well-played and complex, never quite allowing me to completely demonize any of them, allowing me to sympathize with each of their pains.

The theatricality of this was wonderful. The way the fantastical elements are played must be seen. It is a feast of energy.

The story itself manages to masterfully weave between the two narratives of the Girl's journey to the Central Ring and the story of her family breaking apart. The way it is able to concurrently play both stories without losing any of either is truly applaud-worthy.

The message is, of course, important and the emotional arc got me seriously close to crying at the end there.

I really really liked this show, and it was SO CLOSE to being a show that I LOVED.

The symbolism is blatant, but for the most part, it works. A couple of times it got a little too on the nose for my tastes.

There was a point where the Girl got fed up with Joy and I didn't quite buy that shift.

The Central Ring was a touch anticlimactic, especially given how creative and visceral Violence just was. To me, it either needed to be more traditionally climactic or a complete anticlimax. I see a world where either option works.

A beautiful play that manages to pull off a tricky narrative structure, say something meaningful about depression and abuse, while being truly theatrical. I know it is adapted from an upcoming graphic novel and I'm sure there are several adaptational differences, but the way this story was told could only have worked in the theatre. Which is exciting to me, given how sick I am of naturalism on the stage.

sweet - Drew Petriello


Avatar

Director, producer, and playwright Melissa Ordaz’ Silent Joy, playing on the fringe of the Hollywood Fringe Festival at the Studio/Stage, is anything but silent, and the experience of seeing (and hearing) this ensemble production was more than a joy. - RECOMMENDED

sweet - Kevin Hopps - Gia on the Move - ...read full review


Avatar

Inspired by Dante’s Inferno and adapted from the graphic novel by Zach Beckert, the stage version was written by Melissa Ordaz, with musical score composed by Matt Ordaz. Maggie Dorfman and John Michael Logie were magical in the lead roles, taking us through every emotion available to lead us to the goal. The supporting players were led by Carolina Reynoso as the young girl, Ramzi Kelley as the mother, Joshua Lopez as the father and Christopher Flores as the brother. Additional support came from Brian Bautista, Aaron Griffin, Janette, Valenzo and Megan Walker. In addition, Matt Ordaz (xylophone and percussion) and Chrissy Johnson (cello) underscored the show with music that made a difference. You will be changed by this show. Hats off to NAMI (National Alliance on Mental Illness) for their support and for being there.

sweet - Bob Leggett - LA Music Critic - ...read full review


Avatar

...I must commend the director Melissa Ordaz and the entire production team for their approach to tackling this most onerous subject matter. From start to finish the audience is taken on an emotional tidal wave, using movement, dance and music to weave beautiful and haunting scenes from past to present, giving it an almost cinematic quality. The intricate choreography, which could almost be considered a character on its own, keeps the audience fully engaged. With scenes happening simultaneously, there is always something to feast your eyes on.

sweet - Elisa Hoyos - NoHo Arts District - ...read full review


Avatar

Director, producer, and playwright Melissa Ordaz’ Silent Joy, playing on the fringe of the Hollywood Fringe Festival at the Studio/Stage, is anything but silent, and the experience of seeing (and hearing) this ensemble production was more than a joy. - RECOMMENDED

sweet - Kevin Hopps - Gia on the Move - ...read full review


Avatar

The performances are stellar - Maggie Dorfman is a fantastic anchor for the rest of the cast to revolve around. All the members of her family are very well-played and complex, never quite allowing me to completely demonize any of them, allowing me to sympathize with each of their pains.

The theatricality of this was wonderful. The way the fantastical elements are played must be seen. It is a feast of energy.

The story itself manages to masterfully weave between the two narratives of the Girl's journey to the Central Ring and the story of her family breaking apart. The way it is able to concurrently play both stories without losing any of either is truly applaud-worthy.

The message is, of course, important and the emotional arc got me seriously close to crying at the end there.

I really really liked this show, and it was SO CLOSE to being a show that I LOVED.

The symbolism is blatant, but for the most part, it works. A couple of times it got a little too on the nose for my tastes.

There was a point where the Girl got fed up with Joy and I didn't quite buy that shift.

The Central Ring was a touch anticlimactic, especially given how creative and visceral Violence just was. To me, it either needed to be more traditionally climactic or a complete anticlimax. I see a world where either option works.

A beautiful play that manages to pull off a tricky narrative structure, say something meaningful about depression and abuse, while being truly theatrical. I know it is adapted from an upcoming graphic novel and I'm sure there are several adaptational differences, but the way this story was told could only have worked in the theatre. Which is exciting to me, given how sick I am of naturalism on the stage.

sweet - Drew Petriello