TAR

Critics

LemonMeter

Reviews: 2

Audience

LemonMeter

Reviews: 0

A brand new play from award-winning playwright Tom Jacobson.

Los Angeles, 1939. On the night Count Basie is to be one of the first African-American headliners at the Palomar Ballroom, Zenobio Remedios and Amen Headley are stuck at work next door. Attendants at Bimini Baths, they have accepted a delicate after-hours assignment: removing the tar from a drunken Donald Walter, recently fished out of the LaBrea Tar Pits. But as the two men of color work to remove the stain from the white man's skin, they reveal the blot of hatred in his heart. Amen, an aspiring actor, uses his wit and imagination to tease out the shocking story behind Donald's dive into the LaBrea ooze. Deciding what to do with that information leads to a confrontation between Amen and the fearful Zenobio with unexpectedly explosive consequences.

Part of the trilogy, The Ballad of Bimini Baths.

Note about the presentation of the trilogy:

The entire trilogy plays at three different theaters,
at three different locations —
PLUNGE is presented by Son Of Semele
TAR is presented by Playwrights' Arena
MEXICAN DAY is presented by Rogue Machine

For more details and to purchase the ENTIRE trilogy
go to www.biminitrilogy.com

Reviews

Leigh Kennicott

TAR begins and ends Tom Jacobson's Tryptich on Bimini Baths. TAR seems the most straightforward of his three plays. Much of the trilogy depends upon information shared in this installment, which may account for the high degree of exposition that we hear. Nevertheless, Jacobson uses his playwriting skills to keep suspense going almost to the very end. All-important sound – the wonderful Basie and juke-box music – sets the tone. I believe it will best serve to start one's journey into this absorbing fact-based set of plays with TAR.

sweet-sour - Leigh Kennicott - Show Mag - ...read full review


Avatar

Overall, it's an interesting premise, but as with the La Brea Tar Pits, it's mucky, sticky and inert – regardless of what lays buried beneath the surface. The acting was fine, but lacked gravitas to bring some authenticity back to the table.

sour - Frank Arthur - Stage and Cinema - ...read full review


Leigh Kennicott

TAR begins and ends Tom Jacobson's Tryptich on Bimini Baths. TAR seems the most straightforward of his three plays. Much of the trilogy depends upon information shared in this installment, which may account for the high degree of exposition that we hear. Nevertheless, Jacobson uses his playwriting skills to keep suspense going almost to the very end. All-important sound – the wonderful Basie and juke-box music – sets the tone. I believe it will best serve to start one's journey into this absorbing fact-based set of plays with TAR.

sweet-sour - Leigh Kennicott - Show Mag - ...read full review


Avatar

Overall, it's an interesting premise, but as with the La Brea Tar Pits, it's mucky, sticky and inert – regardless of what lays buried beneath the surface. The acting was fine, but lacked gravitas to bring some authenticity back to the table.

sour - Frank Arthur - Stage and Cinema - ...read full review