The 7 Stages of Grieving

Critics

LemonMeter

90 %

Reviews: 5

Audience

LemonMeter

Reviews: 0

As the first professional Aboriginal production in Los Angeles, The 7 Stages of Grieving holds a mirror up to America by sharing Australia’s Aboriginal people’s fight for equality and recognition.

With the hope of reconciliation, The 7 Stages of Grieving gives a comprehensive account of the Aboriginal people and their struggle to survive. These poignant stories reflect similar travails of Native Americans. Politically relevant and culturally profound in the season we celebrate Columbus Day (Indigenous People Day), the play recounts Aboriginal history through true, humorous, and stunning personal tales that open a dialogue on the issues which separate and unite Indigenous and non-Indigenous people: discrimination, inequality, oppression, segregation, and colonization. Their story is your story.

“The themes in 7 Stages have relevance in the USA as there are many shared experiences between Australia and America’s First Nations people, Latinx and Black communities. These stories engage the Los Angeles community with an inspiration to stand-up to current social injustices and continue the conversation to create change,” says producer Josh Thorburn. “As the writers express in this piece, in the end it isn't something you read or write that changes your life or the lives of others. It's something you do.”

United Stages and Skylight Theatre Company presents Grin & Tonic Theatre’s American Premiere of “The 7 Stages of Grieving” Written by Wesley Enoch and Deborah Mailman, directed by Jason Klarwein, and starring Chenoa Deemal.

Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4ob6Y4coSJg

The 7 Stages of Grieving opens at 8:30pm Friday November 1, and runs at 8:00pm on Thursdays, 8:30pm Fridays and Saturdays, 3:00pm on Sundays through November 24, 2019. Skylight Theatre is located at 1816 1/2 N. Vermont Ave, LA, 90027. Tickets are $20 - $35. Reservations: (866) 811-4111,www.unitedtix.org or www.skylighttix.com

Reviews

Avatar

Learning about any culture is worth the effort and Ms. Deemal’s performance illuminates much of the text’s quiet admonitions and educating talk.

After learning what I did during this experience, I can highly recommend audiences flocking to watch this timely show unfurl its wisdom to us.

sweet - Dale Reynolds - Hollywood Revealed - ...read full review


Elaine L. Mura - LA Splash

THE 7 STAGES OF GRIEVING is an internal journey carefully engineering by director Jason Klarwein with compassion and clarity.

...This is a production which will appeal to audiences fascinated by cultural issues, both those reflected in other countries and – by analogy – those which occur every day within our own borders. This is a thought-provoking account of events which happened long ago and far away – and yet which seem so timely right here and now.

sweet - Elaine Mura - Splash Magazines - ...read full review


Avatar

Exploring their dispossession, like a Down Under Anna Deavere Smith in various vignettes Ms. Deemal brings vividly alive harrowing tales of children being torn away from their parents by a paternalistic white state to be “educated” Western-style. If North America’s First Peoples can related to that harrowing history, African Americans can share outrage and solidarity with Aboriginals confronted by police brutality and the school-to-prison-pipeline. Aboriginal Lives Matter, too, and Ms. Deemal singlehandedly enacts mass demonstrations, marches and protests with some bravura thespianism.

sweet - Ed Rampell - Hollywood Progressive - ...read full review


Deborah Klugman

Justin Harrison’s outstanding aural design is a complex cacophony that gives macrocosmic dimension to this impressionistic portrait of a people who have endured for centuries. ...But the text itself remains something of a patchwork, less tightly woven and comprehensive than one might wish it to be

sweet-sour - Deborah Klugman - Stage Raw - ...read full review


Avatar

This is a heavy load for a cast, even more so on a single performer. Yet Chenoa Deemal owns the Skylight’s stage, whether creating concentric circles of pebbles, rifling through the contents of a box and a suitcase, or just speaking directly to the audience. This feels like her story, a tribute to her performance and the timelessness of the script by Wesley Enoch and Deborah Mailman, written when Deemal was likely a small child...

7 Stages beautifully represents the Aboriginal tradition of storytelling and, in a larger context, First Nation peoples finding their voices. There is grieving, yes, but also healing. As Deemal notes in 7 Stages, “Everything has its time.” Now is the time for this show.

sweet - Laura Foti Cohen - Larchmont Buzz - ...read full review


Avatar

Learning about any culture is worth the effort and Ms. Deemal’s performance illuminates much of the text’s quiet admonitions and educating talk.

After learning what I did during this experience, I can highly recommend audiences flocking to watch this timely show unfurl its wisdom to us.

sweet - Dale Reynolds - Hollywood Revealed - ...read full review


Elaine L. Mura - LA Splash

THE 7 STAGES OF GRIEVING is an internal journey carefully engineering by director Jason Klarwein with compassion and clarity.

...This is a production which will appeal to audiences fascinated by cultural issues, both those reflected in other countries and – by analogy – those which occur every day within our own borders. This is a thought-provoking account of events which happened long ago and far away – and yet which seem so timely right here and now.

sweet - Elaine Mura - Splash Magazines - ...read full review


Avatar

Exploring their dispossession, like a Down Under Anna Deavere Smith in various vignettes Ms. Deemal brings vividly alive harrowing tales of children being torn away from their parents by a paternalistic white state to be “educated” Western-style. If North America’s First Peoples can related to that harrowing history, African Americans can share outrage and solidarity with Aboriginals confronted by police brutality and the school-to-prison-pipeline. Aboriginal Lives Matter, too, and Ms. Deemal singlehandedly enacts mass demonstrations, marches and protests with some bravura thespianism.

sweet - Ed Rampell - Hollywood Progressive - ...read full review


Deborah Klugman

Justin Harrison’s outstanding aural design is a complex cacophony that gives macrocosmic dimension to this impressionistic portrait of a people who have endured for centuries. ...But the text itself remains something of a patchwork, less tightly woven and comprehensive than one might wish it to be

sweet-sour - Deborah Klugman - Stage Raw - ...read full review


Avatar

This is a heavy load for a cast, even more so on a single performer. Yet Chenoa Deemal owns the Skylight’s stage, whether creating concentric circles of pebbles, rifling through the contents of a box and a suitcase, or just speaking directly to the audience. This feels like her story, a tribute to her performance and the timelessness of the script by Wesley Enoch and Deborah Mailman, written when Deemal was likely a small child...

7 Stages beautifully represents the Aboriginal tradition of storytelling and, in a larger context, First Nation peoples finding their voices. There is grieving, yes, but also healing. As Deemal notes in 7 Stages, “Everything has its time.” Now is the time for this show.

sweet - Laura Foti Cohen - Larchmont Buzz - ...read full review