THE ART OF DINING

Critics

LemonMeter

93 %

Reviews: 7

Audience

LemonMeter

Reviews: 0

Sun Nov 17, 7:30pm
Sat Nov 23, 8:00pm
Sun Nov 24, 7:30pm
Sat Nov 30, 8:00pm
Sun Dec 01, 7:30pm
Sat Dec 07, 8:00pm
Sun Dec 08, 7:30pm

The play takes place in the late 70s in upscale New Jersey at the shore. Ellen and Cal have opened a restaurant, The Golden Carrousel, and after four weeks, the place is taking off with the dinner crowd. Ellen is the passionate gourmet chef, and Cal is the passionate Maitre’D, host, waiter and bartender. They have been married for eight years and this restaurant is their baby. Tonight, we join them and their very eccentric guests as Cal worries about paying off their $75,000 business loan, impressing the diners for future reservations, and Ellen lovingly and sensually creates gourmet meals. Tonight’s guests are the married people who are gourmands and cannot control any of their appetites; the women who show up to eat and diet at the same time; the shy, neurotic, romantic female writer hoping for everything who is meeting the charming, debonair publisher who has an appetite for life. Everyone craves and eats and laughs, and the audience will smell the food, join in the laughter, and feel the passion, and eat.

Reviews

Avatar

As presented in this well-decorated space, it’s a feast for all the senses. It’s also a peek behind the acting school curtain...

It’s acting with a side of finishing school and it’s definitely worth experiencing.

sweet - Laura Foti Cohen - Larchmont Buzz - ...read full review


Avatar

The Art of Dining directed by Gloria Gifford is deliciously triumphant and delectable too throughout the course of the dining night. The production is filled with extreme touches of brilliance, of manner, and of style. There are some very fine bits of idiosyncrasies beyond the dialogue, and to top it off the characters are wonderfully diverse.

sweet - Joe Straw - Joe Straw #9 - ...read full review


Leigh Kennicott

Double and quadruple cast, Gloria Gifford’s production of Tina Howe’s 70s-era, episodic portrait of a Jersey neighborhood restaurant, purported to be situated in the actual home of its cook and head waiter, paints a fascinating portrait of 60s and 70s social life.
Ellen (Kelly Musslewhite) frantically readies herself for an onslaught of guests while her husband, Cal (Billy Budinich), dreams of expanding their little enterprise into a full-scale restaurant. Do you see the tension here?
Celebrants Hannah (Keturah Hamilton) and Paul Galt (Danny Siegel) and blind dates, David (Haile D’Alan) and Elizabeth (Sabrina), are disturbed when a raucous, ravenous threesome (Leana Chavez, Samiyah Swann and Gloria Alvizar) invades. But the most fun of all comes from the action in the working kitchen (part of the overall design by Gifford, Hamilton and Lucy Walsh).
Gifford has accomplished the difficult job of revolving casting, transitioning between the couples with a minimum of fuss. The best part? The friendliness of Gloria Gifford’s bunch of aspiring actors is such a welcome treat.

sweet - Leigh Kennicott - ShowMag - ...read full review


Avatar

It’s funny, bold and far from boring. It’s intense, full-on, powerful and steamy.

The performances are loud and big and furiously good. They take no prisoners, but then they never do at Gloria Gifford shows. She picks the best material, always pushing the boundaries and challenging the audience as well as the actors. This play is hilarious, the pace fast and the stakes are high, but the result of all this ‘crazy’ is sublime.

sweet - Samantha Simmonds-Ronceros - NoHo Arts District - ...read full review


Avatar

Director Gloria Gifford creates exuberant vignettes of each set of diners wrestling with their own issues, a smorgasbord of tics, attitudes and psychological problems. She keeps the nonstop action flowing as freely as the wine, as each diner tries to satiate their own desires.

Production design is superb, from the overly decorated 1970s look to the actual kitchen where the food is prepared. Costumes and sound add panache and flash.

As tantalizing as its prepared meals, The Art of Dining provides a hilarious evening of sensual pleasures.

sweet - Mary Mallory - Tolucan Times - ...read full review


Avatar

Directed by Gloria Gifford, THE ART OF DINING is a play that hasn’t been performed in the Los Angeles region for some thirty five years! It’s long awaited revival is now available that enjoy a good number of laughs, in addition to how eating has become an art within its own right! Being a real foodie takes skill and effort. Not only that, it also takes a lot of good taste to pull it all off! As the pre-meal “prayer” goes, “Good food, good meat, good gosh, let’s eat!”

sweet - Rich Borowy - Accessibly Live Off-Line - ...read full review


Gil Kaan

Art, as a rule, is subjective. It can be appreciated or not, liked or not. At opening weekend's Sunday performance, playwright Tina Howe's THE ART OF DINING had its own built-in laugh gallery, who loved this ART, as this one large portion of the house frequently led all others in laughter. Gloria Gifford directs her enthusiastic and willing cast through slapstick, overprojecting and over-the-top acting in lightning-fast dialogue, often overlapping, often two separate monologues simultaneously.

sweet-sour - Gil Kaan - Broadway World - ...read full review


Avatar

As presented in this well-decorated space, it’s a feast for all the senses. It’s also a peek behind the acting school curtain...

It’s acting with a side of finishing school and it’s definitely worth experiencing.

sweet - Laura Foti Cohen - Larchmont Buzz - ...read full review


Avatar

The Art of Dining directed by Gloria Gifford is deliciously triumphant and delectable too throughout the course of the dining night. The production is filled with extreme touches of brilliance, of manner, and of style. There are some very fine bits of idiosyncrasies beyond the dialogue, and to top it off the characters are wonderfully diverse.

sweet - Joe Straw - Joe Straw #9 - ...read full review


Leigh Kennicott

Double and quadruple cast, Gloria Gifford’s production of Tina Howe’s 70s-era, episodic portrait of a Jersey neighborhood restaurant, purported to be situated in the actual home of its cook and head waiter, paints a fascinating portrait of 60s and 70s social life.
Ellen (Kelly Musslewhite) frantically readies herself for an onslaught of guests while her husband, Cal (Billy Budinich), dreams of expanding their little enterprise into a full-scale restaurant. Do you see the tension here?
Celebrants Hannah (Keturah Hamilton) and Paul Galt (Danny Siegel) and blind dates, David (Haile D’Alan) and Elizabeth (Sabrina), are disturbed when a raucous, ravenous threesome (Leana Chavez, Samiyah Swann and Gloria Alvizar) invades. But the most fun of all comes from the action in the working kitchen (part of the overall design by Gifford, Hamilton and Lucy Walsh).
Gifford has accomplished the difficult job of revolving casting, transitioning between the couples with a minimum of fuss. The best part? The friendliness of Gloria Gifford’s bunch of aspiring actors is such a welcome treat.

sweet - Leigh Kennicott - ShowMag - ...read full review


Avatar

It’s funny, bold and far from boring. It’s intense, full-on, powerful and steamy.

The performances are loud and big and furiously good. They take no prisoners, but then they never do at Gloria Gifford shows. She picks the best material, always pushing the boundaries and challenging the audience as well as the actors. This play is hilarious, the pace fast and the stakes are high, but the result of all this ‘crazy’ is sublime.

sweet - Samantha Simmonds-Ronceros - NoHo Arts District - ...read full review


Avatar

Director Gloria Gifford creates exuberant vignettes of each set of diners wrestling with their own issues, a smorgasbord of tics, attitudes and psychological problems. She keeps the nonstop action flowing as freely as the wine, as each diner tries to satiate their own desires.

Production design is superb, from the overly decorated 1970s look to the actual kitchen where the food is prepared. Costumes and sound add panache and flash.

As tantalizing as its prepared meals, The Art of Dining provides a hilarious evening of sensual pleasures.

sweet - Mary Mallory - Tolucan Times - ...read full review


Avatar

Directed by Gloria Gifford, THE ART OF DINING is a play that hasn’t been performed in the Los Angeles region for some thirty five years! It’s long awaited revival is now available that enjoy a good number of laughs, in addition to how eating has become an art within its own right! Being a real foodie takes skill and effort. Not only that, it also takes a lot of good taste to pull it all off! As the pre-meal “prayer” goes, “Good food, good meat, good gosh, let’s eat!”

sweet - Rich Borowy - Accessibly Live Off-Line - ...read full review


Gil Kaan

Art, as a rule, is subjective. It can be appreciated or not, liked or not. At opening weekend's Sunday performance, playwright Tina Howe's THE ART OF DINING had its own built-in laugh gallery, who loved this ART, as this one large portion of the house frequently led all others in laughter. Gloria Gifford directs her enthusiastic and willing cast through slapstick, overprojecting and over-the-top acting in lightning-fast dialogue, often overlapping, often two separate monologues simultaneously.

sweet-sour - Gil Kaan - Broadway World - ...read full review