The Direction Home

Critics

LemonMeter

63 %

Reviews: 4

Audience

LemonMeter

Reviews: 0

West Hollywood, 1979. It’s a moment in time before cityhood, before sweeping demographic changes, before gentrification and exorbitant prices, before a decade of the tumultuous upheaval of historic events. It’s a time that’s slightly simpler and perhaps more naïve and innocent.

Four disparate twenty-something individuals move into a rented West Hollywood home. There’s Brad, handsome and straight, but a six-pack away from putting the bi in bi-sexual; Ted, flamboyant but in very deep denial about his sexual orientation; Stephen, virginal and questioning where he’s headed; and a last-minute addition, Katie, Brad’s ex.

The living arrangements are less awkward than they might be. Brad and Katie both know that they are over. Brad starts seeing someone new, Mimi. Katie catches the eye of Michael, a neighbor who’s a successful actor in commercials.

A “comedy in six months,” The Direction Home explores these characters’ relationships, the difficulties of coming of age in a big city, and how important it is to find your own First Family.
Written by Greg Vie. Directed by Kiff Scholl.

Reviews

Avatar
"Although the story’s significance is heartwarming, an uneven plot fails to convey what could have been a well-developed plot about desire and identity. Much of the characters’ growth and development is confined to only a few scenes, making the rest of the narrative feel slow by comparison. The ending is predictable, but satisfying, and certain key moments are wonderfully crafted, but the build-up does not merit the production’s two-and-a-half-hour length. Vie’s message of sexual self-discovery is a strong one, but The Direction Home’s shortcomings unfortunately don’t allow its impact to be fully felt."

sweet-sour - Lara J. Altunian - Stage Raw - ...read full review


Avatar
"Director Kiff Scholl does an excellent job of keeping the action moving with the able assistance of a talented group of ensemble actors."

sweet - Elaine Mura - Splash Magazines - ...read full review


Leigh Kennicott
"Do You Remember 1979? Former hippies were getting jobs, getting married and growing up; aspiring actors were --- well, still aspiring. That’s where we find the denizens of Greg Vie’s fondly remembered comedy, The Direction Home on view at the Actors Company. Home recalls a fateful six months when a disparate group of roommates find themselves overbooked by one: the inexperienced, shy Steven (Jacob Barnes) winds up with the beautiful but level headed Katie (Emilie Martz) as a bedmate. Director Kiff Scholl has done his best to integrate the actors into a cohesive ensemble, but there are difficulties that can’t be overcome. It’s hard for the others to counter Amir Levi’s over-the-top portrayal of Ted; Barnes’s gentle, realistic portrait of the central character, Stephen is no match. While Martz is the most even-handed as Katie, Vaughn Eelis as Brad seems ill at ease onstage, and I wonder how “ok” he is about his nude scene."

sweet-sour - Leigh Kennicott - ShowMag - ...read full review


Steven Stanley
"With more seamless transitions from comedy to drama, a pizzazzier title, and a less abrasive Ted, The Direction Home could end up having legs beyond its World Premiere debut. Even as is, you’ll likely have fun spending time with its mostly engaging characters and celebrate its playwright/protagonist’s journey towards self-acceptance and love."

sweet-sour - Steven Stanley - StageSceneLA - ...read full review


Avatar
"Although the story’s significance is heartwarming, an uneven plot fails to convey what could have been a well-developed plot about desire and identity. Much of the characters’ growth and development is confined to only a few scenes, making the rest of the narrative feel slow by comparison. The ending is predictable, but satisfying, and certain key moments are wonderfully crafted, but the build-up does not merit the production’s two-and-a-half-hour length. Vie’s message of sexual self-discovery is a strong one, but The Direction Home’s shortcomings unfortunately don’t allow its impact to be fully felt."

sweet-sour - Lara J. Altunian - Stage Raw - ...read full review


Avatar
"Director Kiff Scholl does an excellent job of keeping the action moving with the able assistance of a talented group of ensemble actors."

sweet - Elaine Mura - Splash Magazines - ...read full review


Leigh Kennicott
"Do You Remember 1979? Former hippies were getting jobs, getting married and growing up; aspiring actors were --- well, still aspiring. That’s where we find the denizens of Greg Vie’s fondly remembered comedy, The Direction Home on view at the Actors Company. Home recalls a fateful six months when a disparate group of roommates find themselves overbooked by one: the inexperienced, shy Steven (Jacob Barnes) winds up with the beautiful but level headed Katie (Emilie Martz) as a bedmate. Director Kiff Scholl has done his best to integrate the actors into a cohesive ensemble, but there are difficulties that can’t be overcome. It’s hard for the others to counter Amir Levi’s over-the-top portrayal of Ted; Barnes’s gentle, realistic portrait of the central character, Stephen is no match. While Martz is the most even-handed as Katie, Vaughn Eelis as Brad seems ill at ease onstage, and I wonder how “ok” he is about his nude scene."

sweet-sour - Leigh Kennicott - ShowMag - ...read full review


Steven Stanley
"With more seamless transitions from comedy to drama, a pizzazzier title, and a less abrasive Ted, The Direction Home could end up having legs beyond its World Premiere debut. Even as is, you’ll likely have fun spending time with its mostly engaging characters and celebrate its playwright/protagonist’s journey towards self-acceptance and love."

sweet-sour - Steven Stanley - StageSceneLA - ...read full review