The Flying Lovers of Vitebsk

Critics

LemonMeter

83 %

Reviews: 3

Audience

LemonMeter

Reviews: 0

Partners in life and on canvas, Marc and Bella Chagall are immortalized as having one of the most romantic marriages of the 20th Century. The Flying Lovers of Vitebsk traces the young couple as they navigate the Pogroms, the Russian Revolution and each other. Following the artistic heights of Brief Encounter and 946: The Amazing Story of Adolphus Tips, Kneehigh and director Emma Rice return to The Wallis with a production that combines the visuals of Chagall's paintings with the music and dance of the Russian Jewish tradition.

Reviews

Cynthia Citron

When I saw "The Flying Lovers of Vitebsk", a delightful exploration of the life of artist Marc Chagall and his wife, I had to compare it with the movie depicting the life and work of artist Alberto Giacometti. They were unique in their styles and their temperaments: while Giacometti's long-body sculptures and paintings were dramatic and intense, Chagall's fantasy paintings were happy and brightly colored and served to overcome the harsh realities of his life. The film and the play were both superb, especially when seen in the same week,

sweet - Cynthia Citron - Santa Monica Daily Press - ...read full review


Eric A Gordon

The jaunty, fun-embracing, always clever and athletic staging (set and costume design by Sophia Clist) offers the Chagall story almost as a clown show on a sharply raked platform, a virtual Punch and Judy show within the play. Marc's face is painted mime-white, and Bella is dressed like a Russian folk mannequin. The Flying Lovers makes sure to hit the high points of the Chagalls' early lives, but stops far short of probing into causes and problems. At one point, after the Revolution, Marc exclaims about the new climate in Soviet Russia, “A poor Jew is free in Petersburg.” But how it started falling apart for them doesn't receive much attention. Theatrically, it's warmly engaging; historically it's glib and sentimental.... On the way out on opening night (Feb. 24), we heard people use the word “cute” a lot. Yes, it was, a sweet Valentine—in both the positive and negative ways.

sweet-sour - Eric A Gordon - ...read full review


Steven Stanley

While Marc Chagall's paintings have transformed him into an art world legend, his wife's writings have made Bella considerably less of a literary name. The exquisite The Flying Lovers Of Vitebsk gives both Chagalls the attention and acclaim they are due.

sweet - Steven Stanley - Stage Scene LA - ...read full review


Cynthia Citron

When I saw "The Flying Lovers of Vitebsk", a delightful exploration of the life of artist Marc Chagall and his wife, I had to compare it with the movie depicting the life and work of artist Alberto Giacometti. They were unique in their styles and their temperaments: while Giacometti's long-body sculptures and paintings were dramatic and intense, Chagall's fantasy paintings were happy and brightly colored and served to overcome the harsh realities of his life. The film and the play were both superb, especially when seen in the same week,

sweet - Cynthia Citron - Santa Monica Daily Press - ...read full review


Eric A Gordon

The jaunty, fun-embracing, always clever and athletic staging (set and costume design by Sophia Clist) offers the Chagall story almost as a clown show on a sharply raked platform, a virtual Punch and Judy show within the play. Marc's face is painted mime-white, and Bella is dressed like a Russian folk mannequin. The Flying Lovers makes sure to hit the high points of the Chagalls' early lives, but stops far short of probing into causes and problems. At one point, after the Revolution, Marc exclaims about the new climate in Soviet Russia, “A poor Jew is free in Petersburg.” But how it started falling apart for them doesn't receive much attention. Theatrically, it's warmly engaging; historically it's glib and sentimental.... On the way out on opening night (Feb. 24), we heard people use the word “cute” a lot. Yes, it was, a sweet Valentine—in both the positive and negative ways.

sweet-sour - Eric A Gordon - ...read full review


Steven Stanley

While Marc Chagall's paintings have transformed him into an art world legend, his wife's writings have made Bella considerably less of a literary name. The exquisite The Flying Lovers Of Vitebsk gives both Chagalls the attention and acclaim they are due.

sweet - Steven Stanley - Stage Scene LA - ...read full review