THE POW AND THE GIRL

Critics

LemonMeter

57 %

Reviews: 7

Audience

LemonMeter

Reviews: 0

The POW and the Girl  is both Riveting &  Surprising!!

A new play based in part on true  and personal experiences of writer Katrina Wood and her father British character actor Percy Herbert who was both in the Japanese POW camp and built the Bridge on the River Kwai and then went on to be cast in the movie with Alec Guinness at the start of his extensive film career )

Set  in Punk Era  London in the 1980s this story also has deep roots in World War II and the Japanese Changi Prison. Playwright Wood tells of a grandfather, the POW, who survived the notorious Changi prison complex known as the Death Camp.
. He lives with his granddaughter, the Girl, in working-class northern London.

Its a time of fast-moving change in Britain!  Video games and punk rock have revolutionized pop culture.! Women have made their way into the work force in great numbers  notably the strong-willed Margaret Thatcher, who has just taken the helm of the United Kingdom.

Despite the change of modernization in the 80s, mental health treatment remains in its adolescence. Little is known in particular regarding treatment of veterans with Post Traumatic stress syndrome  at the time often referred to by its historic name, shell shock.

Haunted by memories of the war and his former life in London, the POW exhibits classic symptoms of PTSD. He grapples with his demons at the same time he has thrust upon him the responsibility of supporting and protecting his granddaughter, ( at least he sees it that way) !  a college student. The pair are left alone after the death of the Girls mother, his daughter.

The Girl looks to her future, full of hopes and dreams. The POW remains wounded and embittered. The challenges are great for both characters and their familial relationship. Woods drama suggests that war trauma is not just relegated to veterans but is often  indiscriminately passed down through the generations. This play is one not to be missed!

Both shocking and unexpected, this play is full of  humor and heart .  Woven with amazing War time music and Punk music from the ’80 s !  The POW and the Girl unveils the extraordinary courage and resilience demonstrated by families who find a way through the harrowing maze of PTSD!

This story touches the lives of many in unimagined ways.

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Reviews

"Director Trace Oakley, working with a tiny space, brings the present and past to life through his concentration on character rather than lavish sets. He’s also not hesitant to show that, as in real life, there is humor alongside tragedy."

sweet - Morna Murphy Martell - Theatre Spoken Here - ...read full review


"The P.O.W and the Girl is an interesting take on two unbearably different lives being lived and how past experience effects each and every one of us. It’s a unique take on how family means coping with the vast differences between two generations and their experiences. Unfortunately, this production doesn’t live up to the play’s potential."

sour - Audrey Schlief - Stage Raw - ...read full review


"But the combination of a predictable story and a lackluster production leaves our expectations unfulfilled. What should be highly impactful due to the weighty theme lacks any real punch. The spectator is neither drawn into the proceedings nor involved with the characters, and so is left emotionally unaffected. There is also an unfinished quality to the production, as though it were still in the rehearsal stage."

sour - Iris Mann - Stage Raw - ...read full review


"nfortunately, the characters as written lack dimension. They are not helped much by the director, Trace Oakley, who has them doing a lot of heated shouting. And there are staging problems in the small Sherry Theatre space."

sour - Paul Myrvold - Theatre Notes - ...read full review


"It is a show that will remind you of the perseverance of the human spirit bundled with a lot of soul. Starring two wonderful and very talented actors in the demanding leading roles, the action never stops. Chas Mitchell and Samantha Mallory shine independently and together. This is a production well worth the price of a ticket."

sweet - Gerie Rhosen - NoHo Arts District - ...read full review


David MacDowell Blue
"But what stands out remains my emotional reaction. I'm too jaded to be satisfied by a play that goes through the motions or performances that don't ultimately feel like human beings talking, reacting, deciding. Sarah, Paul and Johnny ended up a trio who touched my heart. What happens with, to and by them by play's end feels achieved. More it reminds us there's more to life than tragedy or regret, even if we are very lucky not to end up with lots of both."

sweet - David MacDowell Blue - Night Tinted Glasses - ...read full review


"She and her elder repel with one another at times, but it all comes out as good in the end. This is the idea to what this play is all about without attempting to provide a lesson to what is proper or what should be done about it. This notion is shown throughout. Trace Oakley’s stage direction keep the pacing in gear following this conviction in a progressive stretch."

sweet - Rich Borowy - Accessibly Live Off-Line - ...read full review


"Director Trace Oakley, working with a tiny space, brings the present and past to life through his concentration on character rather than lavish sets. He’s also not hesitant to show that, as in real life, there is humor alongside tragedy."

sweet - Morna Murphy Martell - Theatre Spoken Here - ...read full review


"The P.O.W and the Girl is an interesting take on two unbearably different lives being lived and how past experience effects each and every one of us. It’s a unique take on how family means coping with the vast differences between two generations and their experiences. Unfortunately, this production doesn’t live up to the play’s potential."

sour - Audrey Schlief - Stage Raw - ...read full review


"But the combination of a predictable story and a lackluster production leaves our expectations unfulfilled. What should be highly impactful due to the weighty theme lacks any real punch. The spectator is neither drawn into the proceedings nor involved with the characters, and so is left emotionally unaffected. There is also an unfinished quality to the production, as though it were still in the rehearsal stage."

sour - Iris Mann - Stage Raw - ...read full review


"nfortunately, the characters as written lack dimension. They are not helped much by the director, Trace Oakley, who has them doing a lot of heated shouting. And there are staging problems in the small Sherry Theatre space."

sour - Paul Myrvold - Theatre Notes - ...read full review


"It is a show that will remind you of the perseverance of the human spirit bundled with a lot of soul. Starring two wonderful and very talented actors in the demanding leading roles, the action never stops. Chas Mitchell and Samantha Mallory shine independently and together. This is a production well worth the price of a ticket."

sweet - Gerie Rhosen - NoHo Arts District - ...read full review


David MacDowell Blue
"But what stands out remains my emotional reaction. I'm too jaded to be satisfied by a play that goes through the motions or performances that don't ultimately feel like human beings talking, reacting, deciding. Sarah, Paul and Johnny ended up a trio who touched my heart. What happens with, to and by them by play's end feels achieved. More it reminds us there's more to life than tragedy or regret, even if we are very lucky not to end up with lots of both."

sweet - David MacDowell Blue - Night Tinted Glasses - ...read full review


"She and her elder repel with one another at times, but it all comes out as good in the end. This is the idea to what this play is all about without attempting to provide a lesson to what is proper or what should be done about it. This notion is shown throughout. Trace Oakley’s stage direction keep the pacing in gear following this conviction in a progressive stretch."

sweet - Rich Borowy - Accessibly Live Off-Line - ...read full review