CANCELLED - The Winter's Tale

Critics

LemonMeter

100 %

Reviews: 4

Audience

LemonMeter

Reviews: 0

King Leontes, consumed by unwarranted jealous rage, unleashes catastrophic violence upon his loved ones, shattering the royal family and plunging him into deep remorse. But bitter winter’s thaw ushers in a spring of regeneration and miraculous forgiveness in William Shakespeare’s celebrated romance.

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Running Time: 2 hours and 35 minutes, including one 15-minute intermission

Reviews

Leigh Kennicott

At A Noise Within, The Winter’s Tale, begins with yet another of Shakespeare’s jealous main characters and ends with a Satyr dance and a bear. An the intrepid design staff does it’s best to keep up with a structural set, a trap door and a number of bear costumes. Director Geoff Elliott takes his proficient cast through its paces: longtime ensemble actors, Frederick Stuart and Deborah Strang are especially strong as the jealous monarch, Leontes, and resourceful servant, Paulina, respectively, although Jeremy Rabb as the faithful Camillo, and Alan Blumenfeld as the shepherd run a close second. Finally, the notable movement choreographed by Fight Master, Kenneth R. Merckx, Jr. and dances from co-artistic director, Julia Rodriguez Elliott, fill the bill.

sweet - Leigh Kennicott - ShowMag - ...read full review


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A Noise Within’s new production of The Winter’s Tale focuses on Leontes’ breakdown and ultimate redemption. This production sets the play in the early part of the twentieth century, and features some excellent performances, particularly by Trisha Miller as Hermione, Deborah Strang as Paulina and Frederick Stuart as Leontes.

sweet - Michael Doherty - Mostly Shakespeare - ...read full review


Avatar

Geoff Elliott directs, streamlining the script. Frederica Nascimento’s scenic design makes the Sicilian scenes densely somber, the characters living within walls of thick black stone. Brightness and congeniality fill the Bohemian scenes, as the characters dance in pastoral beauty while life blooms all around them.

Leontes realizes his unrestrained jealousy has ruined his life and the lives of too many others. A happy ending, beautifully rendered, reminds us, as do all these productions this week, that we can’t always control others so we must learn to control ourselves.

sweet - Dany Margolies - Daily News - ...read full review


Avatar

The two parts seem like different plays, but Elliott homes in on their connecting logic, trimming the text for focus and flow. Momentum slows occasionally, and performances sometimes turn leaden, but overall, Elliott is well served by his cast of 15 and by his designers (Frederica Nascimento, sets; Ken Booth, lights; and Garry Lennon, costumes).

sweet - Daryl H. Miller - LA Times - ...read full review


Leigh Kennicott

At A Noise Within, The Winter’s Tale, begins with yet another of Shakespeare’s jealous main characters and ends with a Satyr dance and a bear. An the intrepid design staff does it’s best to keep up with a structural set, a trap door and a number of bear costumes. Director Geoff Elliott takes his proficient cast through its paces: longtime ensemble actors, Frederick Stuart and Deborah Strang are especially strong as the jealous monarch, Leontes, and resourceful servant, Paulina, respectively, although Jeremy Rabb as the faithful Camillo, and Alan Blumenfeld as the shepherd run a close second. Finally, the notable movement choreographed by Fight Master, Kenneth R. Merckx, Jr. and dances from co-artistic director, Julia Rodriguez Elliott, fill the bill.

sweet - Leigh Kennicott - ShowMag - ...read full review


Avatar

A Noise Within’s new production of The Winter’s Tale focuses on Leontes’ breakdown and ultimate redemption. This production sets the play in the early part of the twentieth century, and features some excellent performances, particularly by Trisha Miller as Hermione, Deborah Strang as Paulina and Frederick Stuart as Leontes.

sweet - Michael Doherty - Mostly Shakespeare - ...read full review


Avatar

Geoff Elliott directs, streamlining the script. Frederica Nascimento’s scenic design makes the Sicilian scenes densely somber, the characters living within walls of thick black stone. Brightness and congeniality fill the Bohemian scenes, as the characters dance in pastoral beauty while life blooms all around them.

Leontes realizes his unrestrained jealousy has ruined his life and the lives of too many others. A happy ending, beautifully rendered, reminds us, as do all these productions this week, that we can’t always control others so we must learn to control ourselves.

sweet - Dany Margolies - Daily News - ...read full review


Avatar

The two parts seem like different plays, but Elliott homes in on their connecting logic, trimming the text for focus and flow. Momentum slows occasionally, and performances sometimes turn leaden, but overall, Elliott is well served by his cast of 15 and by his designers (Frederica Nascimento, sets; Ken Booth, lights; and Garry Lennon, costumes).

sweet - Daryl H. Miller - LA Times - ...read full review