The Woman Is Perfected

Critics

LemonMeter

Reviews: 1

Audience

LemonMeter

100 %

Reviews: 3

“The Woman Is Perfected” follows the psychological breakdown of a single young woman entangled in abusive relationships and a crippling compulsion to perfect her body through plastic surgery. Written by Ruth Fowler, starring Maliabeth Johnson (“Parks and Recreation,” “Mad Men,” “American Horror Story: Hotel”) and directed by Ryan McRee, this feminist “Everyman” tragedy will have its World Premiere at the Hollywood Fringe Festival. Ruth's “sharp and unsparing” writing has been praised by numerous critics, and the recent premiere of her play “bled for the household truth” at Rogue Machine Theatre was labeled by the L.A. Times “a timely exposé of what passes for intimacy in the Digital Age.” Now, having shifted her focus to the commodification of women's bodies, she presents a harrowing new psychodrama with her unique balance of clinical investigation and emotional exploration. The play challenges—in terms both literal and expressionistic—how to cling to a genuine sense of identity in a world in which appearances are dominant, artificiality is celebrated, and our customization options are very nearly infinite.

Reviews

This harrowing, fascinating portrait shows a woman who has absorbed misogyny into her psyche without condition or doubt.

sweet - David MacDowell Blue - Night Tinted Glasses - ...read full review


Excellent performance! With this intense and highly emotional material, a lesser actress could easily have lapsed into scenery-chewing melodrama. Ms Johnson has the skills to gradually bring this pot to a boil at its dramatic finish. Congratulations to everyone involved in this fine production.

sweet - Dan Hunting


The collaboration between the writer and actress was something that I could only describe as, beautiful magic. Ruth wrote a character with a multitude of layers, dealing with perfection and self-love that are extremely relevant and relatable to our society today. A character that I must say was nothing short of scary. It is every woman's worst nightmare to become her, but we also all play with that line every day. Maliabeth took the words off the page and fully unhinged herself, crossing that line. She brought you into the darkest places of not just her mind but yours too.

sweet - Allison Zahigian


Perfection is an impossibility. It's an ideal to be pursued. This play explores the dramatic ends we reach when we become obsessed with that which can not last. The audience is placed in the headspace of a woman in her late 20s who is struggling with her identity while going to increasingly drastic ends to stave off her physical decline. Viewers come away with a renewed understanding and empathy, not only for those suffering with body dysmorphia, but also for anyone searching for a way to feel validation in a world increasingly preoccupied with the superficial.

sweet - Shawn Alff


This harrowing, fascinating portrait shows a woman who has absorbed misogyny into her psyche without condition or doubt.

sweet - David MacDowell Blue - Night Tinted Glasses - ...read full review


Excellent performance! With this intense and highly emotional material, a lesser actress could easily have lapsed into scenery-chewing melodrama. Ms Johnson has the skills to gradually bring this pot to a boil at its dramatic finish. Congratulations to everyone involved in this fine production.

sweet - Dan Hunting


The collaboration between the writer and actress was something that I could only describe as, beautiful magic. Ruth wrote a character with a multitude of layers, dealing with perfection and self-love that are extremely relevant and relatable to our society today. A character that I must say was nothing short of scary. It is every woman's worst nightmare to become her, but we also all play with that line every day. Maliabeth took the words off the page and fully unhinged herself, crossing that line. She brought you into the darkest places of not just her mind but yours too.

sweet - Allison Zahigian


Perfection is an impossibility. It's an ideal to be pursued. This play explores the dramatic ends we reach when we become obsessed with that which can not last. The audience is placed in the headspace of a woman in her late 20s who is struggling with her identity while going to increasingly drastic ends to stave off her physical decline. Viewers come away with a renewed understanding and empathy, not only for those suffering with body dysmorphia, but also for anyone searching for a way to feel validation in a world increasingly preoccupied with the superficial.

sweet - Shawn Alff