The Wrong Kind of People

Critics

LemonMeter

92 %

Reviews: 6

Audience

LemonMeter

Reviews: 0

Theo, an African-American law student, needing privacy to study for the California Bar Exam during 1942, checks in at the exclusive Guardian Hotel located in downtown Los Angeles. He is assigned to “The Colored Room” a rarely used, run-down room at the back of the hotel. During his first night at the Guardian his studies are interrupted by four diverse “denizens of the night” who seek private entry to the hotel via his window. During the course of the evening, there will be sexual shenanigans, a shady card game, and an inconvenient corpse. Theo gains the “real world education” needed to prepare him for the challenges of a career as an attorney.

Written by George W. Corbin. Directed by C. Julian White. Presented by The Robey Theatre Company.

Reviews

Leigh Kennicott

The Wrong Kind of People, by George W. Corbin, is a contemporary look at some of the sort of every-day prejudices that still inform some aspects of African-American life, in the style of the drawing-room comedies of bygone days.

The location is “the colored room,” a room designated in every hotel to accommodate African-American guests. Theo (Ken Ivey) has booked the room in order to find some peace and quiet in order to study for the California Bar. But there is a catch. One of the bellmen, the resourceful Fixit (Damon Rutledge), uses the room to ferry an assortment of back-door players into the hotel. What could possibly go wrong?

The Robey players, nimbly directed by C. Julian White, strike just the right comedic tone. Foremost among them, Rutledge as Fixit shows a quiet dignity; while the Purdys (Darrell Philip and Stephanie Schulz), maintain a realistic, love/hate balance that exemplifies long-married spouses. Artistic Director and producer, Ben Guillory, enables the performance with solid production values, while director White laces the proceedings with evocative pop songs of the period.

sweet - Leigh Kennicott - ShowMag - ...read full review


Avatar

Under C. Julian White’s direction, the show moves at an even pace. The quick-witted lines provided by Corbin coincides with the actor’s actions. Nothing feels rushed and the heartfelt laughter derived from the audience is as authentic as Corbin and White’s execution of a wonderful story.

sweet - Mary Montoro - All About the Stage - ...read full review


Avatar

However, mischievous director C. Julian White forgot that audiences need to hear, as well as see, since his excellent actors spoke so softly and intimately to each other that about 50% of the dialogue was incomprehensible. Otherwise, a great deal of fun was had by all.

sweet - Morna Murphy Martell - Theatre Spoken Here - ...read full review


Avatar

George W. Corbin has written a marvelous play, an oblique comedy that was enjoyable from start to finish. The Wrong Kind of People is smartly written and clever in every sense of the word. The characters are multi-dimensional and the dialogue takes this viewer back to 1942.  Placed perfectly, in the screwball comedy era of the 1940s, this show never lets up.

sweet - Joe Straw - Joe Straw #9 - ...read full review


Eric A Gordon

As a screwball piece of nonsense, it works almost as cleverly as a Swiss watch. But produced by the 25-year-old Robey Theatre Company, dedicated to providing opportunities to Black actors in works that tell stories of the global Black experience, the zany play hasn’t a great deal of substance to offer. Perhaps the title sums it up best, forcing us to ask who really are “the wrong kind of people.”

sweet-sour - Eric Gordon - People's World - ...read full review


Avatar

The play is a fun night, full of film noir–esque twists and turns. As the heightened circumstances get more and more ridiculous, the risk that Theo’s bright future could fade increases.

sweet - Julia Stier - Stage Raw - ...read full review


Leigh Kennicott

The Wrong Kind of People, by George W. Corbin, is a contemporary look at some of the sort of every-day prejudices that still inform some aspects of African-American life, in the style of the drawing-room comedies of bygone days.

The location is “the colored room,” a room designated in every hotel to accommodate African-American guests. Theo (Ken Ivey) has booked the room in order to find some peace and quiet in order to study for the California Bar. But there is a catch. One of the bellmen, the resourceful Fixit (Damon Rutledge), uses the room to ferry an assortment of back-door players into the hotel. What could possibly go wrong?

The Robey players, nimbly directed by C. Julian White, strike just the right comedic tone. Foremost among them, Rutledge as Fixit shows a quiet dignity; while the Purdys (Darrell Philip and Stephanie Schulz), maintain a realistic, love/hate balance that exemplifies long-married spouses. Artistic Director and producer, Ben Guillory, enables the performance with solid production values, while director White laces the proceedings with evocative pop songs of the period.

sweet - Leigh Kennicott - ShowMag - ...read full review


Avatar

Under C. Julian White’s direction, the show moves at an even pace. The quick-witted lines provided by Corbin coincides with the actor’s actions. Nothing feels rushed and the heartfelt laughter derived from the audience is as authentic as Corbin and White’s execution of a wonderful story.

sweet - Mary Montoro - All About the Stage - ...read full review


Avatar

However, mischievous director C. Julian White forgot that audiences need to hear, as well as see, since his excellent actors spoke so softly and intimately to each other that about 50% of the dialogue was incomprehensible. Otherwise, a great deal of fun was had by all.

sweet - Morna Murphy Martell - Theatre Spoken Here - ...read full review


Avatar

George W. Corbin has written a marvelous play, an oblique comedy that was enjoyable from start to finish. The Wrong Kind of People is smartly written and clever in every sense of the word. The characters are multi-dimensional and the dialogue takes this viewer back to 1942.  Placed perfectly, in the screwball comedy era of the 1940s, this show never lets up.

sweet - Joe Straw - Joe Straw #9 - ...read full review


Eric A Gordon

As a screwball piece of nonsense, it works almost as cleverly as a Swiss watch. But produced by the 25-year-old Robey Theatre Company, dedicated to providing opportunities to Black actors in works that tell stories of the global Black experience, the zany play hasn’t a great deal of substance to offer. Perhaps the title sums it up best, forcing us to ask who really are “the wrong kind of people.”

sweet-sour - Eric Gordon - People's World - ...read full review


Avatar

The play is a fun night, full of film noir–esque twists and turns. As the heightened circumstances get more and more ridiculous, the risk that Theo’s bright future could fade increases.

sweet - Julia Stier - Stage Raw - ...read full review