There's No Place Like

Critics

LemonMeter

100 %

Reviews: 6

Audience

LemonMeter

Reviews: 2

Inspired by bus journeys, bumpy flights and the current news, There's No Place Like marks the US debut of international company Althea Theatre.
Hannah was a teacher before she moved to the UK. Now she works in a pub.
Jordan lost his mum six months ago. Six days ago, he lost his job, too.
With nothing to keep him here, Jordan walks into Hannah's pub looking for an answer to the question: is it time to go home? And, if the answer is ‘yes' – where exactly is that?

Combining award-winning theatre with a stunning live soundtrack, There's No Place Like is a bittersweet and timely play about longing, belonging and immigration.

Following a sold out run in London's West End and a critically acclaimed international tour, Althea Theatre are proud to present the American premiere of There's No Place Like this summer.

Written by Lilac Yosiphon
Directed by Marianne Mayer and Mike Cole
Set and costumes by Carolina Herran and Kitty Roe
Music by Sam Elwin

Performed by Sam Elwin and Lilac Yosiphon

Learn More at hollywoodfringe.org/projects/THERESNOPLACELIKE

Reviews

The UK-based touring company Althea Theatre had a short run of performances at the Hollywood Fringe: their success with a string of bookings around California was our loss because this is a beautifully-written play and deserves a far greater exposure in the Los Angeles theatre scene. I would like to see it staged in one of the mainstream houses like the Ahmanson or Kirk Douglas - it is a beautiful two-hander that explores the concepts of home, returning to our birthplace, and creating new homes where we are. A kind of theatrical cousin to the notion of “if you can't be with the one you love, love the one you're with” (or love the place you're in). The two actors, Lilac Yosiphon & Sam Elwin, present beautifully understated performances, with very clear and subtle acting choices that have been refined in their years of training at top London conservatoires. Lilac is also the director & writer, a triple delight of talents that hint at her shining future ahead. She is definitely “one to watch” & deserves a place in the Hollywood Reporter-style articles of “30 Under [the age of] 30” as her writing suggests a great maturity and depth beyond her years. One dominant theme of the play is the question of identity and what is 'home' for a modern Israeli Jew. Questions about Israel are present in the vast majority of “Jewish” plays (and I use that term lightly in this context, since the action takes place in a great British pub!). Lilac Yosiphon presents a brand new take on this Israel question, playing an Israeli Jew who loves her homeland but has no plans to return, albeit partly because her character is living in England on an expired working visa, so if she goes ‘home', there is no easy way to get back to her new ‘home'. The climax of the play is a beautiful song, sung simultaneously in Hebrew and English with perfect harmony. Its haunting and melodic tune has emotional depth that leads us back to our own heart to ask “where is home for you?”. I would end the review by saying “Go and see this play” but last night was their last performance at the Fringe. Next best, look ‘em up online and watch out for their next performance in the city, or book them to come back. There's no play like it.

sweet - Marcus J Freed


This is a beautifully polished production from the London-based Althea Theatre. A young man encounters a barmaid in a pub and their conversations touch on what the nature of home and belonging is. It could have been preachy and hard handed, but the characters are so well drawn that it effortlessly both provokes thought and gently entertains. I left the theatre feeling quite uplifted.

sweet - David Barber


This play is beautifully and profound and funny and sad. I have been a first generation immigrant in two countries, since I was 10 years old. And what it feels to be one has never been expressed more simply and more beautifully in my life, than in this play. The play is so simple and the dialogue is so natural, that the hour flew by too fast. I wanted to hear more and I wanted to find out more about these two characters. This is a must see show!

sweet - Enci Box - ...read full review


This show communicates an incredibly valuable lesson and one that larger audiences probably need to hear. It teaches that not every immigrant has the same story and that we can never truly understand the politics and cultures of other countries if we choose to be blind and just accept what we are told. Yosiphon does a wonderful job of treating serious and difficult matters with a light sense of humour, yet the comedy never overtakes the seriousness of the subject.

sweet - Tal Fox (A Younger Theatre) - ...read full review


Deep, meaningful, and pure piece of fringe theatre. Yosiphon gives us a charming and intelligent look at immigration, belonging, charity, and family, with a not-so- happy ending and a lot of provocative thought.

sweet - J Waygood (Grumpy Gay Critic) - ...read full review


A touching piece about belonging, and what we consider to make something our ‘home' – just the tonic for an uncertain political climate.

sweet - Debbie (Please Mind The Blog) - ...read full review


There's No Place Like, written and staring Lilac Yosiphon, is a tour de force of romantic and political drama wrapped around the lives of two people who meet by chance when one is working in a bar, and the other is seeking solace at the bottom of a bottle.

Yosiphon wrote and performed this play in her second language. Artistry like that is something that if we allow to be lost from our stages will be a true sadness. For all of our wisdom and imagination, being at the heart of another's shared experience is something tremendous.

sweet - Dominic Stevenson - ...read full review


A real jewel of staging and interpretation for questions that arise for every human being at a time of his life.

sweet - Claire Bonnot - ...read full review


This play is beautifully and profound and funny and sad. I have been a first generation immigrant in two countries, since I was 10 years old. And what it feels to be one has never been expressed more simply and more beautifully in my life, than in this play. The play is so simple and the dialogue is so natural, that the hour flew by too fast. I wanted to hear more and I wanted to find out more about these two characters. This is a must see show!

sweet - Enci Box - ...read full review


This show communicates an incredibly valuable lesson and one that larger audiences probably need to hear. It teaches that not every immigrant has the same story and that we can never truly understand the politics and cultures of other countries if we choose to be blind and just accept what we are told. Yosiphon does a wonderful job of treating serious and difficult matters with a light sense of humour, yet the comedy never overtakes the seriousness of the subject.

sweet - Tal Fox (A Younger Theatre) - ...read full review


Deep, meaningful, and pure piece of fringe theatre. Yosiphon gives us a charming and intelligent look at immigration, belonging, charity, and family, with a not-so- happy ending and a lot of provocative thought.

sweet - J Waygood (Grumpy Gay Critic) - ...read full review


A touching piece about belonging, and what we consider to make something our ‘home' – just the tonic for an uncertain political climate.

sweet - Debbie (Please Mind The Blog) - ...read full review


There's No Place Like, written and staring Lilac Yosiphon, is a tour de force of romantic and political drama wrapped around the lives of two people who meet by chance when one is working in a bar, and the other is seeking solace at the bottom of a bottle.

Yosiphon wrote and performed this play in her second language. Artistry like that is something that if we allow to be lost from our stages will be a true sadness. For all of our wisdom and imagination, being at the heart of another's shared experience is something tremendous.

sweet - Dominic Stevenson - ...read full review


A real jewel of staging and interpretation for questions that arise for every human being at a time of his life.

sweet - Claire Bonnot - ...read full review


The UK-based touring company Althea Theatre had a short run of performances at the Hollywood Fringe: their success with a string of bookings around California was our loss because this is a beautifully-written play and deserves a far greater exposure in the Los Angeles theatre scene. I would like to see it staged in one of the mainstream houses like the Ahmanson or Kirk Douglas - it is a beautiful two-hander that explores the concepts of home, returning to our birthplace, and creating new homes where we are. A kind of theatrical cousin to the notion of “if you can't be with the one you love, love the one you're with” (or love the place you're in). The two actors, Lilac Yosiphon & Sam Elwin, present beautifully understated performances, with very clear and subtle acting choices that have been refined in their years of training at top London conservatoires. Lilac is also the director & writer, a triple delight of talents that hint at her shining future ahead. She is definitely “one to watch” & deserves a place in the Hollywood Reporter-style articles of “30 Under [the age of] 30” as her writing suggests a great maturity and depth beyond her years. One dominant theme of the play is the question of identity and what is 'home' for a modern Israeli Jew. Questions about Israel are present in the vast majority of “Jewish” plays (and I use that term lightly in this context, since the action takes place in a great British pub!). Lilac Yosiphon presents a brand new take on this Israel question, playing an Israeli Jew who loves her homeland but has no plans to return, albeit partly because her character is living in England on an expired working visa, so if she goes ‘home', there is no easy way to get back to her new ‘home'. The climax of the play is a beautiful song, sung simultaneously in Hebrew and English with perfect harmony. Its haunting and melodic tune has emotional depth that leads us back to our own heart to ask “where is home for you?”. I would end the review by saying “Go and see this play” but last night was their last performance at the Fringe. Next best, look ‘em up online and watch out for their next performance in the city, or book them to come back. There's no play like it.

sweet - Marcus J Freed


This is a beautifully polished production from the London-based Althea Theatre. A young man encounters a barmaid in a pub and their conversations touch on what the nature of home and belonging is. It could have been preachy and hard handed, but the characters are so well drawn that it effortlessly both provokes thought and gently entertains. I left the theatre feeling quite uplifted.

sweet - David Barber