Too Heavy for Your Pocket

Critics

LemonMeter

92 %

Reviews: 6

Audience

LemonMeter

Reviews: 0

In rural Tennessee at the height of the Civil Rights Movement, two young African-American couples struggle to understand justice, love, and their own responsibilities. TOO HEAVY FOR YOUR POCKET beautifully explores the sacrifices and tolls in the fight for freedom and equality that are placed, not only on the fighters, but the people they love.

Reviews

Shari Barrett

The memories I have of 1961 include watching JFK being sworn in as President at the beginning of year, with the promise of better times ahead for everyone. And even though we were still required to have "drop drills" to prepare us for an atomic bomb attack, knowing full well hiding under our desks would not prevent our demise, we could still go home and feel safe and accepted in our small community. But it never dawned on me at that time that others lived their lives in fear and separation based only on the color of their skin as I, too, lived in a segregated community at the other end of the spectrum.

I had several reasons for wanting to see the West Coast Premiere of Jireh Breon Holder's TOO HEAVY FOR MY POCKET, produced by Scott Golden for Sacred Fools Theater Company, brilliantly directed by the talented Michael A. Shepperd, Artistic Director of Los Angeles' award-winning Celebration Theatre. I knew he would honor this delicate story of aspiration and familial love Review: TOO HEAVY FOR MY POCKET Reflects the Belief a Better Future was Possible in 1961centering on two African-American couples struggling to find their way in a year filled with the promise of a better future for everyone, taking place at the height of the Civil Rights Movement when Freedom Fighters took to the road in buses to battle justice in the Deep South, firmly believing that equal rights for all people deserved to be the law of the land. And that boys will be boys and women will always forgive them their trespasses when babies are part of the equation by speaking out for equality in their own lives and homes.

sweet - Shari Barrett - Broadway World - ...read full review


Dan Berkowitz

Watching the West Coast premiere of Jireh Breon Holder's Too Heavy for Your Pocket at the Broadwater Black Box, I couldn't help thinking I was eavesdropping more than watching a play. Part of it is due to the size of the small theatre, where no seat is more than three rows from the stage. Part is that the actors sometimes venture off the stage proper, to speak, argue, or sing only inches from someone in the audience. But most of all, I think, it's because director Michael A. Shepperd has created a sense of intimacy, a feeling that we're peeking, uninvited, through a window and seeing what four Black people in the early 1960s American South actually talk about, feel, and think when they believe no white folks are around.

sweet - Dan Berkowitz - The Los Angeles Post - ...read full review


Avatar

While the play features familiar dramaturgical stereotypes, it achieves poignancy and freshness by focusing on the Civil Rights movement through the prism of class and gender.

sweet-sour - Vanessa Cate - Stage Raw - ...read full review


David MacDowell Blue

Bozie, who seems our hero, clearly plays the role of clown, and his friends enjoy it. Truth to tell, they all have wonderful senses of humor. Yet there's an edge, one we see first in Bozie. Even as they celebrate his acceptance into college, he has a brief explosion of rage amid his own pride. What lies behind it?

sweet - David MacDowell Blue - Night Tinted Glasses - ...read full review


Matt Ritchey

Too Heavy For Your Pocket, the West Coast Premiere of Jiréh Breon Holder's fantastic play about two families in 1960's Nashville, is a touching and emotional success on every level and a wonderful production by Sacred Fools. - Highly Recommended

sweet - Matt Ritchey - Gia on the Move - ...read full review


Avatar

This play written by Jireh Breon Holder takes a historical point in 20th century American history and develops a melodrama that is both stirring and fiery in terms of emotion. The ensemble cast of these four players show their skills to portray their characters with a sense of believability through Michael A. Shepperd's stage direction.

sweet - Rich Borowy - Accessibly Live Off-Line - ...read full review


Shari Barrett

The memories I have of 1961 include watching JFK being sworn in as President at the beginning of year, with the promise of better times ahead for everyone. And even though we were still required to have "drop drills" to prepare us for an atomic bomb attack, knowing full well hiding under our desks would not prevent our demise, we could still go home and feel safe and accepted in our small community. But it never dawned on me at that time that others lived their lives in fear and separation based only on the color of their skin as I, too, lived in a segregated community at the other end of the spectrum.

I had several reasons for wanting to see the West Coast Premiere of Jireh Breon Holder's TOO HEAVY FOR MY POCKET, produced by Scott Golden for Sacred Fools Theater Company, brilliantly directed by the talented Michael A. Shepperd, Artistic Director of Los Angeles' award-winning Celebration Theatre. I knew he would honor this delicate story of aspiration and familial love Review: TOO HEAVY FOR MY POCKET Reflects the Belief a Better Future was Possible in 1961centering on two African-American couples struggling to find their way in a year filled with the promise of a better future for everyone, taking place at the height of the Civil Rights Movement when Freedom Fighters took to the road in buses to battle justice in the Deep South, firmly believing that equal rights for all people deserved to be the law of the land. And that boys will be boys and women will always forgive them their trespasses when babies are part of the equation by speaking out for equality in their own lives and homes.

sweet - Shari Barrett - Broadway World - ...read full review


Dan Berkowitz

Watching the West Coast premiere of Jireh Breon Holder's Too Heavy for Your Pocket at the Broadwater Black Box, I couldn't help thinking I was eavesdropping more than watching a play. Part of it is due to the size of the small theatre, where no seat is more than three rows from the stage. Part is that the actors sometimes venture off the stage proper, to speak, argue, or sing only inches from someone in the audience. But most of all, I think, it's because director Michael A. Shepperd has created a sense of intimacy, a feeling that we're peeking, uninvited, through a window and seeing what four Black people in the early 1960s American South actually talk about, feel, and think when they believe no white folks are around.

sweet - Dan Berkowitz - The Los Angeles Post - ...read full review


Avatar

While the play features familiar dramaturgical stereotypes, it achieves poignancy and freshness by focusing on the Civil Rights movement through the prism of class and gender.

sweet-sour - Vanessa Cate - Stage Raw - ...read full review


David MacDowell Blue

Bozie, who seems our hero, clearly plays the role of clown, and his friends enjoy it. Truth to tell, they all have wonderful senses of humor. Yet there's an edge, one we see first in Bozie. Even as they celebrate his acceptance into college, he has a brief explosion of rage amid his own pride. What lies behind it?

sweet - David MacDowell Blue - Night Tinted Glasses - ...read full review


Matt Ritchey

Too Heavy For Your Pocket, the West Coast Premiere of Jiréh Breon Holder's fantastic play about two families in 1960's Nashville, is a touching and emotional success on every level and a wonderful production by Sacred Fools. - Highly Recommended

sweet - Matt Ritchey - Gia on the Move - ...read full review


Avatar

This play written by Jireh Breon Holder takes a historical point in 20th century American history and develops a melodrama that is both stirring and fiery in terms of emotion. The ensemble cast of these four players show their skills to portray their characters with a sense of believability through Michael A. Shepperd's stage direction.

sweet - Rich Borowy - Accessibly Live Off-Line - ...read full review