UNTIL THE FLOOD

Critics

LemonMeter

88 %

Reviews: 8

Audience

LemonMeter

Reviews: 1

Pulitzer Prize finalist and celebrated performer Dael Orlandersmith (Forever) explores the social uprising in Ferguson, Missouri following the shooting of teenager Michael Brown. Pulling from her extensive interviews with Missouri residents, Orlandersmith crafts a stunning theatrical experience that must be seen.

Reviews

Shari Barrett

During the play, Orlandersmith portrays several characters, both black and white, on both sides of the issue, by adding different costume pieces designed by Kaye Voyce to denote each one, with the actress changing her way of speaking and overall physicality with each new person she presents, with each name projected on the wall behind her. Every single one becomes unique thanks to her expert way of totally transforming herself, both physically and from her soul.

sweet - Shari Barrett - Broadway World - ...read full review


Deborah Klugman

Directed by Neel Keller, Until the Flood is a palette of grays, as well as a map that tracks the fault lines and schisms within families as well as races.....The writing itself is simple, eloquent, straight-to-the-heart storytelling, best suited to an intimate venue.

sweet - Deborah Klugman - Stage Raw - ...read full review


Avatar

I know we need Ms. Orlandersmith's performance but in the 4 years since she first brought this show to life, I wonder if we've seen enough to do without the distraction. I wonder if as an audience, as a country, we can hear what Ms. Orlandersmith's characters are trying to tell us?

You need to - we all do.

sweet - Anthony Byrnes - KCRW - ...read full review


Avatar

...It is this balance and depth of intuition that makes Until the Flood compelling. Orlandersmith’s work displays a deep acceptance of flawed human frailty and the helpless contradictions in all people. Until the Flood escalates in power and vision, ending on a poetic riff that is at once an unanswer, a lament for the state of affairs — and a way of saying, “you decide…”

sweet - Sylvie Drake - Cultural Weekly - ...read full review


Avatar

But something has changed for Orlandersmith with Flood: her acting is profoundly deeper than in the past, which is mandatory to offer a truer and more compassionate verdict of the Ferguson flash-point. It’s performed on scenic designer Takeshi Kata’s unadorned raised stage surrounded by candles, and other memorabilia honoring Michael Brown (lit beautifully by Mary Louise Geiger). Upstage, Nicholas Hussong’s projections display photos on a sheet not unlike a Klansman’s cloak. In this unsafe zone where fear clashes with broken trust, Orlandersmith transforms herself into a telling cross-section of townsfolk caught in the troubles.

sweet - Tony Frankel - Stage and Cinema - ...read full review


Avatar

The production, directed by Neel Keller with a finesse that never calls undue attention to itself, presents a stage with a few different seating options representing a living room, a flexible public venue and a barbershop. These spaces coexist as Orlandersmith transforms herself from one figure to the next by merely throwing on a shawl or a baseball jacket.

sweet - Charles McNulty - LA Times - ...read full review


Avatar

Director Neel Keller does an excellent job of bringing to life each of Orlandersmith’s alter-egos – whether they be black, white, male, female, young, or old. Takeshi Kata’s scenic design is simple but artful as Orlandersmith glides from personality to personality and center stage to corner space...

But above all, this is Orlandersmith’s show as she cleverly invites the audience to peek at the inner lives of so many interesting people experiencing the after-effects of trauma and racial bias. With subtle changes of expression, movement, and speech, she projects the dissimilarities – and similarities – of the individuals she spoke to. UNTIL THE FLOOD is a thought-provoking production which turns the philosophic into human form with all the faults, foibles, hopes, and dreams of real people.

sweet - Elaine Mura - Splash Magazines


Avatar

Orlandersmith uses body language and vocal inflection to excellent effect. Whether white or black, male or female, young or old, all of her characters come alive before our eyes, give voice to their pent-up, heart-felt emotions (some of which, it must be said, are racist to the core). In short, Orlandersmith delivers a stunning, tour de force performance, one which must be rated as memorable.

sweet - Marie J. Kilker - Total Theater - ...read full review


Avatar

In fairness, it's important to note that the actor's words do, indeed, tell her stories, but the virtual dearth of movement made it difficult to stay politely awake. Theatre requires action and interaction:

sour - Michael Sheehan - On Stage Los Angeles - ...read full review


Shari Barrett

During the play, Orlandersmith portrays several characters, both black and white, on both sides of the issue, by adding different costume pieces designed by Kaye Voyce to denote each one, with the actress changing her way of speaking and overall physicality with each new person she presents, with each name projected on the wall behind her. Every single one becomes unique thanks to her expert way of totally transforming herself, both physically and from her soul.

sweet - Shari Barrett - Broadway World - ...read full review


Deborah Klugman

Directed by Neel Keller, Until the Flood is a palette of grays, as well as a map that tracks the fault lines and schisms within families as well as races.....The writing itself is simple, eloquent, straight-to-the-heart storytelling, best suited to an intimate venue.

sweet - Deborah Klugman - Stage Raw - ...read full review


Avatar

I know we need Ms. Orlandersmith's performance but in the 4 years since she first brought this show to life, I wonder if we've seen enough to do without the distraction. I wonder if as an audience, as a country, we can hear what Ms. Orlandersmith's characters are trying to tell us?

You need to - we all do.

sweet - Anthony Byrnes - KCRW - ...read full review


Avatar

...It is this balance and depth of intuition that makes Until the Flood compelling. Orlandersmith’s work displays a deep acceptance of flawed human frailty and the helpless contradictions in all people. Until the Flood escalates in power and vision, ending on a poetic riff that is at once an unanswer, a lament for the state of affairs — and a way of saying, “you decide…”

sweet - Sylvie Drake - Cultural Weekly - ...read full review


Avatar

But something has changed for Orlandersmith with Flood: her acting is profoundly deeper than in the past, which is mandatory to offer a truer and more compassionate verdict of the Ferguson flash-point. It’s performed on scenic designer Takeshi Kata’s unadorned raised stage surrounded by candles, and other memorabilia honoring Michael Brown (lit beautifully by Mary Louise Geiger). Upstage, Nicholas Hussong’s projections display photos on a sheet not unlike a Klansman’s cloak. In this unsafe zone where fear clashes with broken trust, Orlandersmith transforms herself into a telling cross-section of townsfolk caught in the troubles.

sweet - Tony Frankel - Stage and Cinema - ...read full review


Avatar

The production, directed by Neel Keller with a finesse that never calls undue attention to itself, presents a stage with a few different seating options representing a living room, a flexible public venue and a barbershop. These spaces coexist as Orlandersmith transforms herself from one figure to the next by merely throwing on a shawl or a baseball jacket.

sweet - Charles McNulty - LA Times - ...read full review


Avatar

Orlandersmith uses body language and vocal inflection to excellent effect. Whether white or black, male or female, young or old, all of her characters come alive before our eyes, give voice to their pent-up, heart-felt emotions (some of which, it must be said, are racist to the core). In short, Orlandersmith delivers a stunning, tour de force performance, one which must be rated as memorable.

sweet - Marie J. Kilker - Total Theater - ...read full review


Avatar

In fairness, it's important to note that the actor's words do, indeed, tell her stories, but the virtual dearth of movement made it difficult to stay politely awake. Theatre requires action and interaction:

sour - Michael Sheehan - On Stage Los Angeles - ...read full review


Avatar

Director Neel Keller does an excellent job of bringing to life each of Orlandersmith’s alter-egos – whether they be black, white, male, female, young, or old. Takeshi Kata’s scenic design is simple but artful as Orlandersmith glides from personality to personality and center stage to corner space...

But above all, this is Orlandersmith’s show as she cleverly invites the audience to peek at the inner lives of so many interesting people experiencing the after-effects of trauma and racial bias. With subtle changes of expression, movement, and speech, she projects the dissimilarities – and similarities – of the individuals she spoke to. UNTIL THE FLOOD is a thought-provoking production which turns the philosophic into human form with all the faults, foibles, hopes, and dreams of real people.

sweet - Elaine Mura - Splash Magazines