Yes. No. Maybe.

Critics

LemonMeter

Reviews: 1

Audience

LemonMeter

100 %

Reviews: 11

What would you do for a million dollars? What would you do for someone you love? Can we ever be certain that we'll NEVER do something like have sex for money or career advancement? Thorne & his wife Fleur find themselves in a modern day twist of the Indecent Proposal scenario. Yes, people are being targeted by sexual predators, but what about the people who consciously use sex to get ahead? "Yes. No. Maybe." examines the moral implications of the ways in which we all prostitute ourselves to advance our careers, improve our bank balances, stay in power, keep a roof over our heads, or get whatever it is we feel we 'need' to survive, be happy or feel validated. We've all done things we regret, but what if you had a million dollars for each of those things you did that you regret? And if you were rich enough to buy anything, what's more enticing than something that money can't buy?

"Yes. No. Maybe." is a dramedy of manners for an adult audience unafraid to consider the possibility that their morals may not be as set in stone as they'd like to believe...

Comedy, drama and a splash of contemporary dance merge to create a unique theatrical experience.

Use discount code YNM-BL will get $2 off a $12 ticket

Reviews

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"Sharply written, well directed and beautifully acted. Both thought provoking and very entertaining, I would highly recommend it."

sweet - Richard Large


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"This show is edgy, thought provoking, and oh, so provative. I loved it. The show starting out with the best question: Blind or Deaf. Its days since I’ve seen the show and I am still pondering that question. The cast is perfect. I love the young couple, the very grounded wise and keep it real assistant. This show really stirred, so many thoughts about: money, sex and how we use our own personal resources to get ahead. Yes. No. Maybe, really awakens the energy of this new world breaking away from our Puritanical past.DeeDee was so grounded and funny. Being raised Southern Baptist, I found the young woman (as part of the couple) interesting, and fearless, this sort of dangerous open mindedness, I found myself rooting for her at times. What stood out the most to me in the writing was the twist of prospective. In society, we always see the one with the means of money and power as the predator, but In Yes. No. Maybe, I found myself understanding and compassionate for his loss. I am so excited Yes. No. Maybe has extended, I just might stop by again, this time with a large popcorn."

sweet - Crystal Bush


Avatar
"A proposal of what does sexual orientation actually mean on the surface, ‘Yes. No. Maybe.’ is a deeper piece of work wherein the language is current and the subject is vital. As our society begins to truly break down the barriers erected by generations past, a whole world of problematic issues is refined by a fine focus here with a married couple not afraid to bare who they are to each other, and us, but why when they are presented with an unorthodox solution to their millennial predicament. The characters are three dimensional, the dialogue is sharp and the heart invested by cast and audience alike is more than sweet."

sweet - Scot Shamblin


Avatar
"Amazingly done. Thought-provoking & unexpected twists carried out by a wonderful cast. Full of rich dialogue and touched on subjects that stayed with me long after the show had ended."

sweet - Danielle Johnson


Avatar
"Thought provoking character driven comedy about what money could convince you to do something you otherwise wouldn’t. Smart writing, well directed, and a strong ensemble. Definitely worth a watch!"

sweet - Tarah Pollock


Avatar
"A whip smart, well written commentary on sexuality, morality and socioeconomics. This smart and funny one act will have you reassessing who you are or thought you were and where your moral compass lands – would you say Yes No or Maybe? What I liked The writing was fabulous and smart. I loved the characters and was especially pleased with the role of the assistant. She was written wittily and moved the story along well without being just an instrument to that end. I loved the physicality of the show and thought the acro was used well to represent sex. I also loved that this show gave us a view of both sides of the coin. In showing both characters motivations and insecurities it really made you think about who was taking advantage of whom, or for that matter if anyone was taking advantage of anyone."

sweet - Lea Walker


Avatar
"What I liked SPOILER ALERT AHEAD I liked everybody, in particular Al LaFleur and Dee Dee Stephen’s performances. Al LaFleur playing Thorne Ellison, a handsome go-go dancer/aspiring actor whose intentions are noble at first but slowly becomes corrupted by the greed of his wife Fleur (played by Kelly Rook Daly) who entices him to take the money a tycoon has offered in exchange of sex that will get them out of her parents’ garage and out of their misery, basically “take one for the team”. Dee Dee plays Michelle Wyllie, personal assistant to Austen Kenwood (Raymond-Kym Suttle), whose loyalty shows when the couple comes to his house to “complete the deed” and allow Thorne to sleep with Austen in Indecent Proposal fashion. Dee Dee’s is the only voice of reason in a cynical and materialistic world where consenting adults cross the boundaries of relationship and love for the love of money. What I didn't like The music was at times too loud when I wanted to focus on the dialogue. Also, the lighting could have been dimmed as the actors prepared the next scene. My overall impression A tight and clever script that may be easily adapted into a movie script. What Raymond-Kym Suttle has written is short of amazing."

sweet - Victor Sotomayor


Avatar
"“Yes. No. Maybe.” is a totally engaging night at the theater. Beautifully written, produced, directed and acted by Raymond-Kym Suttle, the play is funny, thought provoking, edgy and unique. All of the performances are wonderful and the chemistry between Raymond-Kym, Al LaFleur, Kelly Rook Daly and Dee Dee Stephens is electric. Should you go see “Yes. No. Maybe?” Yes, Yes, Yes!"

sweet - Juliet Landau


Avatar
"Yes, No, Maybe was a complete joy to watch! It’s a contained dramedy featuring 4 characters who are exploring the limits of their morality, loneliness, sexuality and desperation. Bonds of love and humility are tested when a young (and very attractive) couple is propositioned by an older (and powerful) film producer. I don’t want to spoil it for you but I really can’t. It’s the deal with the devil parable albeit with enough new wrinkles that it feels fresh. What really makes this one stand out is how it lands the dismount, leaving the audience with no single devil one which we can place the blame, just a bunch of little demons who will seemingly never have their fill. Al LaFleur and Kelly Rook Daly perfectly sell the complexities of being a hot, thoughtful, hot, artistic, hot, creative and hot couple working in entertainment in LA. One almost gets the sense that they are actually hot, thoughtful, hot artistic, hot, creative and hot people off the stage as well. Dee Dee Stephens plays the often-ignored voice of reason. While I wanted her voice to be heard more throughout the story, I imagine the other three who have more than earned her admonishments would only and always ignore them. Sorry, Dee Dee… you’re too wise for this story. Finally, there’s writer-director-star Raymond-Kym Suttle. It’s rare to see that many hyphens in front of an actor’s name and still see them take the stage as the heel of the story. Raymond-Kym’s commitment to his character’s own narcissistic emptiness is impressive and clearly the work of a seasoned actor who knows story comes first. Leave the kids at home for this one."

sweet - Jesse Koester


Avatar
"A Brilliant well written and excellently directed play by Raymond Kym-Suttle! The acting is outstanding by all the cast! A play that keeps you on your toes guessing what the initial outcome will be. I liked that I had to keep guessing right up until the end what the outcome was going to be. Wasn’t predictable and very clever twists and turns. Everyone seemed to have an equal chance of the spotlight."

sweet - Nichola Fynn


Rob Stevens
"It’s a well-crafted script with depth and humor, deftly directed by Suttle? (no program credit is given) with strong performances by the quartet of actors. Yes.No.Maybe. may pose or answer a few questions for its audience."

sweet - Rob Stevens - Haines His Way - ...read full review


Avatar
"An intriguing little dramady that explores boundaries in more ways than one. The show has a lot to say, and it says so very wittily and with superb acting - and without battering the audience over the head with the message stick. All four performers are excellently cast. They all have fully realized inner lives and solid senses of comedic timing. For the most part, the play is naturalistic, but there occasional breaks into something a little more abstract that I really enjoy, like in the way sex scenes are handled. Each character also gives a monologue to the audience that sums up a unique part of their character. So much about the situation these characters find themselves in is fraught. It begs questions about the ethical conduct of those in power, but also about those who consentingly(?) choose to sleep to the top. There are a lot of questions raised and no real answers given. It's all left up for the audience to come to their own conclusions without firm judgment cast down on any one character. Everyone behaves in a flawed manner... but also behaves generously. The gray areas will leave you scratching your head for days. And did I mention it's really funny? The dialogue is full of witticisms and one-liners that you'll wish you thought of. There is a survey given before they show. I'm curious to see what will be done with it. I know the dialogue is quick and quippy, but occasionally a line was spoken so quickly that I didn't know what was said. The introduction of the main couple, while funny, didn't quite work for me. Maybe it's because I hate the game of rhetorical impossible questions. Actually, it's probably more that they both initially come off as unlikeable and I grew to like them as the story went on. I wanted to be in at least one of their courts at the outset. These are minor quibbles. The show succeeded in what it set out to do and is enjoyable and provocative the whole way through."

sweet - Drew Petriello


Rob Stevens
"It’s a well-crafted script with depth and humor, deftly directed by Suttle? (no program credit is given) with strong performances by the quartet of actors. Yes.No.Maybe. may pose or answer a few questions for its audience."

sweet - Rob Stevens - Haines His Way - ...read full review


Avatar
"Sharply written, well directed and beautifully acted. Both thought provoking and very entertaining, I would highly recommend it."

sweet - Richard Large


Avatar
"This show is edgy, thought provoking, and oh, so provative. I loved it. The show starting out with the best question: Blind or Deaf. Its days since I’ve seen the show and I am still pondering that question. The cast is perfect. I love the young couple, the very grounded wise and keep it real assistant. This show really stirred, so many thoughts about: money, sex and how we use our own personal resources to get ahead. Yes. No. Maybe, really awakens the energy of this new world breaking away from our Puritanical past.DeeDee was so grounded and funny. Being raised Southern Baptist, I found the young woman (as part of the couple) interesting, and fearless, this sort of dangerous open mindedness, I found myself rooting for her at times. What stood out the most to me in the writing was the twist of prospective. In society, we always see the one with the means of money and power as the predator, but In Yes. No. Maybe, I found myself understanding and compassionate for his loss. I am so excited Yes. No. Maybe has extended, I just might stop by again, this time with a large popcorn."

sweet - Crystal Bush


Avatar
"A proposal of what does sexual orientation actually mean on the surface, ‘Yes. No. Maybe.’ is a deeper piece of work wherein the language is current and the subject is vital. As our society begins to truly break down the barriers erected by generations past, a whole world of problematic issues is refined by a fine focus here with a married couple not afraid to bare who they are to each other, and us, but why when they are presented with an unorthodox solution to their millennial predicament. The characters are three dimensional, the dialogue is sharp and the heart invested by cast and audience alike is more than sweet."

sweet - Scot Shamblin


Avatar
"Amazingly done. Thought-provoking & unexpected twists carried out by a wonderful cast. Full of rich dialogue and touched on subjects that stayed with me long after the show had ended."

sweet - Danielle Johnson


Avatar
"Thought provoking character driven comedy about what money could convince you to do something you otherwise wouldn’t. Smart writing, well directed, and a strong ensemble. Definitely worth a watch!"

sweet - Tarah Pollock


Avatar
"A whip smart, well written commentary on sexuality, morality and socioeconomics. This smart and funny one act will have you reassessing who you are or thought you were and where your moral compass lands – would you say Yes No or Maybe? What I liked The writing was fabulous and smart. I loved the characters and was especially pleased with the role of the assistant. She was written wittily and moved the story along well without being just an instrument to that end. I loved the physicality of the show and thought the acro was used well to represent sex. I also loved that this show gave us a view of both sides of the coin. In showing both characters motivations and insecurities it really made you think about who was taking advantage of whom, or for that matter if anyone was taking advantage of anyone."

sweet - Lea Walker


Avatar
"What I liked SPOILER ALERT AHEAD I liked everybody, in particular Al LaFleur and Dee Dee Stephen’s performances. Al LaFleur playing Thorne Ellison, a handsome go-go dancer/aspiring actor whose intentions are noble at first but slowly becomes corrupted by the greed of his wife Fleur (played by Kelly Rook Daly) who entices him to take the money a tycoon has offered in exchange of sex that will get them out of her parents’ garage and out of their misery, basically “take one for the team”. Dee Dee plays Michelle Wyllie, personal assistant to Austen Kenwood (Raymond-Kym Suttle), whose loyalty shows when the couple comes to his house to “complete the deed” and allow Thorne to sleep with Austen in Indecent Proposal fashion. Dee Dee’s is the only voice of reason in a cynical and materialistic world where consenting adults cross the boundaries of relationship and love for the love of money. What I didn't like The music was at times too loud when I wanted to focus on the dialogue. Also, the lighting could have been dimmed as the actors prepared the next scene. My overall impression A tight and clever script that may be easily adapted into a movie script. What Raymond-Kym Suttle has written is short of amazing."

sweet - Victor Sotomayor


Avatar
"“Yes. No. Maybe.” is a totally engaging night at the theater. Beautifully written, produced, directed and acted by Raymond-Kym Suttle, the play is funny, thought provoking, edgy and unique. All of the performances are wonderful and the chemistry between Raymond-Kym, Al LaFleur, Kelly Rook Daly and Dee Dee Stephens is electric. Should you go see “Yes. No. Maybe?” Yes, Yes, Yes!"

sweet - Juliet Landau


Avatar
"Yes, No, Maybe was a complete joy to watch! It’s a contained dramedy featuring 4 characters who are exploring the limits of their morality, loneliness, sexuality and desperation. Bonds of love and humility are tested when a young (and very attractive) couple is propositioned by an older (and powerful) film producer. I don’t want to spoil it for you but I really can’t. It’s the deal with the devil parable albeit with enough new wrinkles that it feels fresh. What really makes this one stand out is how it lands the dismount, leaving the audience with no single devil one which we can place the blame, just a bunch of little demons who will seemingly never have their fill. Al LaFleur and Kelly Rook Daly perfectly sell the complexities of being a hot, thoughtful, hot, artistic, hot, creative and hot couple working in entertainment in LA. One almost gets the sense that they are actually hot, thoughtful, hot artistic, hot, creative and hot people off the stage as well. Dee Dee Stephens plays the often-ignored voice of reason. While I wanted her voice to be heard more throughout the story, I imagine the other three who have more than earned her admonishments would only and always ignore them. Sorry, Dee Dee… you’re too wise for this story. Finally, there’s writer-director-star Raymond-Kym Suttle. It’s rare to see that many hyphens in front of an actor’s name and still see them take the stage as the heel of the story. Raymond-Kym’s commitment to his character’s own narcissistic emptiness is impressive and clearly the work of a seasoned actor who knows story comes first. Leave the kids at home for this one."

sweet - Jesse Koester


Avatar
"A Brilliant well written and excellently directed play by Raymond Kym-Suttle! The acting is outstanding by all the cast! A play that keeps you on your toes guessing what the initial outcome will be. I liked that I had to keep guessing right up until the end what the outcome was going to be. Wasn’t predictable and very clever twists and turns. Everyone seemed to have an equal chance of the spotlight."

sweet - Nichola Fynn


Avatar
"An intriguing little dramady that explores boundaries in more ways than one. The show has a lot to say, and it says so very wittily and with superb acting - and without battering the audience over the head with the message stick. All four performers are excellently cast. They all have fully realized inner lives and solid senses of comedic timing. For the most part, the play is naturalistic, but there occasional breaks into something a little more abstract that I really enjoy, like in the way sex scenes are handled. Each character also gives a monologue to the audience that sums up a unique part of their character. So much about the situation these characters find themselves in is fraught. It begs questions about the ethical conduct of those in power, but also about those who consentingly(?) choose to sleep to the top. There are a lot of questions raised and no real answers given. It's all left up for the audience to come to their own conclusions without firm judgment cast down on any one character. Everyone behaves in a flawed manner... but also behaves generously. The gray areas will leave you scratching your head for days. And did I mention it's really funny? The dialogue is full of witticisms and one-liners that you'll wish you thought of. There is a survey given before they show. I'm curious to see what will be done with it. I know the dialogue is quick and quippy, but occasionally a line was spoken so quickly that I didn't know what was said. The introduction of the main couple, while funny, didn't quite work for me. Maybe it's because I hate the game of rhetorical impossible questions. Actually, it's probably more that they both initially come off as unlikeable and I grew to like them as the story went on. I wanted to be in at least one of their courts at the outset. These are minor quibbles. The show succeeded in what it set out to do and is enjoyable and provocative the whole way through."

sweet - Drew Petriello