You in Midair

Critics

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90 %

Reviews: 5

Audience

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Reviews: 0

Danna Schaeffer brings her uniquely Hollywood story — an intimate, harrowing, often funny and ultimately joyful story of loss, memory and hard-won wisdom — to the Hollywood Fringe Festival. On July 18, 1989, the blooming Hollywood career of actress Rebecca Schaeffer was cut tragically short when she was murdered on her front step by an obsessed fan. You In Midair is her mother's spell-binding story. “Audiences are rapt… real life on stage, capturing the essence of life, emotion, love, longing, grief.” — DeAnn Welker, Oregon ArtsWatch June 3 – June 17: Sun., June 3 at 2 p.m.; Sat., June 9 at 12 p.m.; Sun., June 10 at 6 p.m.; Thurs., June 14 at 10 p.m.; Sat., June 16 at 8 p.m.' Sun., June 17 at 4 p.m.; Lounge Theatre, 6201 Santa Monica Blvd, Hollywood CA 90038; $12; (323) 455-4585; www.YouInMidair.com

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Reviews

"All of the elements that went into making this most professional production are dazzling, especially direction by Julie Akers, lighting by Katelan Braymer, and sound design by Phil Johnson. This show is definitely among best of the Fringe ‘18."

sweet - Bonnie Priever - ...read full review


"With a sparse stage of just three chairs, a red rotary phone, and the issue of Seventeen magazine with Rebecca's visage on the cover, Danna gives a vibrant performance with more heartfelt humor than one might expect considering the narrative revolves around a murder. But there is pathos in her levity. And there's a steeliness in her maternal instincts. She's a likable performer with a breezy style. She's someone you'd like to know, which magnifies the tragedy that befalls her."

sweet - Harker Jones - Arts in LA - ...read full review


Shari Barrett
"I clearly remember when actress Rebecca Schaeffer was murdered in 1989 on her doorstep by a fan who was stalking her, long before this type of behavior was the norm as it seems to be today. This solo show, written and performed with amazing emotional insight by her mother Dana Schaeffer, begins with stories from her only child's childhood during which she worried if little Rebecca was out of her sight for a few minutes. So imagine how this proud mother, who spoke daily with her daughter when she moved from Oregon to Los Angeles to pursue her acting dreams after landing the lead role in My Sister Sam and then visited with her in Rome and Venice while filming a movie, reacted with disbelief when a call from a police officer in Los Angeles called to tell her that Rebecca had been gunned down and died. Dana somehow has the ability to recount the horror of that night and the weeks that followed from having to identify the body to planning a funeral. Shared with so much heartfelt emotion that you can feel her heart in yours, this production directed by Julie Akers, needs to be seen by anyone not believing that gun laws need to be enforced to keep crazed lunatics from creating havoc against innocent victims. With a 90 minute rum time, this show deserves a full at a local theater since Rebecca's death happened in this city. It would be great to include even more photos and videos from Rebecca's life so everyone can appreciate how her mother's never-ending love keeps her spirit alive."

sweet - Shari Barrett - ...read full review


"Danna is a descriptive playwright, not an actress, yet her performance had me paralyzed in my seat. I couldn't move as I sat riveted listening to her story... It uncomfortable trying to console someone dealing with grief and people with well intensions, sometimes say the wrong thing. That's when Danna infuses humor in a play so dark and sad. Danna's  scene where she and her mother have a blowout at LAX, and another when the two Rabbis have a smackdown at Rebecca's funeral, gives us permission to laugh out loud. It's hard to chuckle when the subject is about death, but Danna encourages it with her storytelling and facial expressions."

sweet - Jill Weinlein - On Stage - ...read full review


Mark Hein
""You in Midair: An Elegy for a Daughter" is not an elegy, and it's not about the daughter. A more accurate subtitle — “A Mother's Lament,” “Life with a Hole in It” ? — would better prepare us. What we experience is the long, often difficult journey of a mother whose bright child, a rising actor, was torn away by murder. Danna Schaeffer seasons the story with wit, and tells us movingly of her grief; but because she declines to enter it or share it fully, we are allowed no catharsis, no relief."

sweet-sour - Mark Hein - ...read full review


"All of the elements that went into making this most professional production are dazzling, especially direction by Julie Akers, lighting by Katelan Braymer, and sound design by Phil Johnson. This show is definitely among best of the Fringe ‘18."

sweet - Bonnie Priever - ...read full review


"With a sparse stage of just three chairs, a red rotary phone, and the issue of Seventeen magazine with Rebecca's visage on the cover, Danna gives a vibrant performance with more heartfelt humor than one might expect considering the narrative revolves around a murder. But there is pathos in her levity. And there's a steeliness in her maternal instincts. She's a likable performer with a breezy style. She's someone you'd like to know, which magnifies the tragedy that befalls her."

sweet - Harker Jones - Arts in LA - ...read full review


Shari Barrett
"I clearly remember when actress Rebecca Schaeffer was murdered in 1989 on her doorstep by a fan who was stalking her, long before this type of behavior was the norm as it seems to be today. This solo show, written and performed with amazing emotional insight by her mother Dana Schaeffer, begins with stories from her only child's childhood during which she worried if little Rebecca was out of her sight for a few minutes. So imagine how this proud mother, who spoke daily with her daughter when she moved from Oregon to Los Angeles to pursue her acting dreams after landing the lead role in My Sister Sam and then visited with her in Rome and Venice while filming a movie, reacted with disbelief when a call from a police officer in Los Angeles called to tell her that Rebecca had been gunned down and died. Dana somehow has the ability to recount the horror of that night and the weeks that followed from having to identify the body to planning a funeral. Shared with so much heartfelt emotion that you can feel her heart in yours, this production directed by Julie Akers, needs to be seen by anyone not believing that gun laws need to be enforced to keep crazed lunatics from creating havoc against innocent victims. With a 90 minute rum time, this show deserves a full at a local theater since Rebecca's death happened in this city. It would be great to include even more photos and videos from Rebecca's life so everyone can appreciate how her mother's never-ending love keeps her spirit alive."

sweet - Shari Barrett - ...read full review


"Danna is a descriptive playwright, not an actress, yet her performance had me paralyzed in my seat. I couldn't move as I sat riveted listening to her story... It uncomfortable trying to console someone dealing with grief and people with well intensions, sometimes say the wrong thing. That's when Danna infuses humor in a play so dark and sad. Danna's  scene where she and her mother have a blowout at LAX, and another when the two Rabbis have a smackdown at Rebecca's funeral, gives us permission to laugh out loud. It's hard to chuckle when the subject is about death, but Danna encourages it with her storytelling and facial expressions."

sweet - Jill Weinlein - On Stage - ...read full review


Mark Hein
""You in Midair: An Elegy for a Daughter" is not an elegy, and it's not about the daughter. A more accurate subtitle — “A Mother's Lament,” “Life with a Hole in It” ? — would better prepare us. What we experience is the long, often difficult journey of a mother whose bright child, a rising actor, was torn away by murder. Danna Schaeffer seasons the story with wit, and tells us movingly of her grief; but because she declines to enter it or share it fully, we are allowed no catharsis, no relief."

sweet-sour - Mark Hein - ...read full review