Steven Sabel’s Twist on the Trade: Content Equals Character

We were all recently reminded that it was Martin Luther King Jr. who famously dreamed of a world where we would all be judged by the content of our character, but in our industry, artists are judged rather by the amount and quality of their generated content. Content equals character in a world where online presence is often the key to getting the job.

Whether we like it or not, the norm of the modern age of entertainment is to judge an artist by the amount and quality of the online content they can continue to generate. Relevant content equals relevance in the industry and viability as a marketable commodity. As an entertainment industry professional, you are a commodity. Or, you are not. We have all heard the stories about people getting work because of their large social media followings, YouTube subscriber base, or viral content. Go viral, or go extinct. Create a high profile, build an online presence, generate constant content, or slide into the oblivion of just another fantasy hobbyist. Get serious, or seriously reconsider your choice of profession.

Think about it. You are a business. Your commodity is you. You are your product and you are selling a service. In order to succeed in business, you must build your marketing machine, and your marketing machine must include an online presence filled with relevant content for prospective customers to seek, find, and assess before they will purchase. In today’s age, nobody purchases anything or uses any service without first researching the company or the product – even if all that entails is posting to the “hive mind” for recommendations of where to eat, what to buy, or who to use for a needed service. I won’t eat at a new restaurant, if they don’t have a website with a menu, photos, and reviews. Would you?

As entertainment professionals, we cannot expect that anyone will hire us if we are a complete unknown without a relevant online presence. If you don’t have a website, you don’t exist. If all you are is a collection of personal social media accounts, you are no different than your cousin, Cecil, who works at the canning factory back home in Wisconsin. Get real. Google yourself. I guarantee that casting directors will before they offer you a job. What will they find? Your personal Facebook page? Your Instagram account?

If you don’t have a fan page and a website associated with you as a commodity, then you are not a commodity. How serious can you really be about your professional career if you can’t take the time to register a domain name and build a simple website? Or if you’re completely tech illiterate – get a friend, bribe a friend, or pay a friend to build a site for you. Look at the major professionals whose careers you wish you could have. Assess what they all have in common when it comes to their online presence and generating relevant content. Most of them have people who do it for them, but until you are able to hire a marketing team – you are your marketing team.

If you don’t have available content associated with your career – you don’t have a career.

What you have is a fantasy life – no different than your best hometown friend, Sallie Mae, who you left behind back in Nebraska to become the manager of the local mini mart. If you happen to be the manager of a mini mart here in LA, but you’re not using every spare hour striving to demonstrate that you are something more than a fresh-off-the-bus fantasy player – then Sallie Mae has it all over you, because she isn’t paying $800 per month to rent a room with five other people in a three bedroom apartment in Koreatown with one bathroom. In fact, Sally Mae is laughing at you from her three bedroom, two bath house in Omaha, that (according to a Zillow search) she can get for $1,000 per month.

Get real. Get serious, or you might as well move back to Nebraska. If your only online presence is your personal social media accounts, you are not a professional business person – you’re a hobbyist. In this world, you are what you do. If all you do is post about drinking at local bars with friends – your social media presence says you are a bar fly, not an industry professional. If all you do is post about political issues that interest you – you are a gadfly, not an industry professional. If all you do is post about that great restaurant you ate at last night – you are a wanna-be food critic. You are not an entertainment industry professional.

Entertainment industry professionals post about the work they are doing – even when they do not currently have any employment in the industry. Remember my favorite Sabelism: you have to do the work to get the work. True professionals will post about anything and everything they are doing to better their career. They post about acting classes they are taking, auditions they are preparing for, new physical workouts and diet regimens they are committing to in order to enhance their physical viability for the roles they wish to play. At the very minimum, true professionals are posting about new scripts they are perusing, monologues they are learning, accents they are perfecting, skills they are acquiring, or industry books they are reading to learn more about their craft.

When they do have work, true professionals are generating content about that work. They are posting about learning their lines, studying their scenes, doing their research on their project’s time era, setting, hairstyles, clothing, manners, and any other thing that can assist their backstory and the creation of a viable character. They post about rehearsals. They post from the set while on break from filming. They post behind-the-scenes looks into their processes. They provide hints about their costuming or props, and they sell themselves as professionals on the job. Even when they are not on the job of fulfilling a role or a contract, they are on the job of getting more jobs by constantly generating content to demonstrate that they are true serious professionals.

True professionals post about the projects they are working on – promoting themselves and whatever it is they are doing day and night. The best way to market your product and services to new potential customers, is to promote the work you are currently doing for existing customers. It is far easier to generate relevant content when you are working, and far more important too, if you want to keep the string of work flowing. When you book a gig, it isn’t an excuse to take a break from doing the work, but should rather serve as the impetus for doing even more work to line up the next project.

Build and fill your website. Create a public fan page. Flood your sites with relevant content. Do your best to be the only Joanie Jones or Sam Smith on the first page of a Google search. Content is character, and if your dream is to make a living in this industry, you must know that you will be judged by your content, or lack of it….


Steven Sabel's Twist on the Trade: Get Resolved

A new year, and everybody is talking, tweeting, posting, snap-gramming, and insta-chatting about their New Year’s Resolutions. I find it ironic that we wait until Dec. 31 to get resolved about things in our lives which obviously need resolving every other day of our year, but are then ignored. When it comes to your craft, you better resolve yourself to make some kind of effort every single day to better your chances of success, or you might as well resolve yourself to a lifetime of waiting tables, babysitting, dog-walking, customer greeting, Ubering, or whatever it is you’re currently doing to pay your bills. For that matter, if you have resolved yourself to a life of driving other people around for money while they ask you questions such as: “Oh, are you trying to be an actor?” and “Are you doing that ‘acting’ thing?” then you might as well resolve yourself to Lyfting in a city that isn’t so damned expensive, and leave Hollywood behind you.

If it takes the new year to encourage you to resolve yourself to making more effort each day to advance your entertainment career, then so be it. Nonetheless, if you want to make it, you are going to have to set a new resolution every day. Every day!

So many of us have taken that “day job” to help us pay our bills, and then allowed it to derail our efforts to make a living through our craft. So many of us get overwhelmed by our “adulating” responsibilities that we forget to concentrate our available time and energy toward at least improving our craft. Every day. You have to do the work to get the work.

You absolutely have to resolve yourself to doing at least one important thing every day toward perfecting your craft and advancing your career hopes. If you want to escape Uber hell, then you have to be constantly working toward that escape – one spoon full of earth at a time, if necessary, to dig your way out of the restaurant server servitude and the like.

While you are reading this, ask yourself right now what you have done today to advance your entertainment career, and then resolve yourself to set an immediate plan to do something more before the day is over.

Resolutions are such a curious thing. The word itself has so many profound meanings. We commonly adhere to the most prevalent meaning: to be earnest in a decision; determined. Yet to resolve also means to separate into parts, or to break up; even “disintegrate.” Perfect. Then as artists it should be our goal to resolve the obstacles in our path to success. Separate them into parts. Break them up, and accomplish them one at a time, every day. Resolve to eventually disintegrate them.

Additional meanings of resolve include: to transform by any process; reduce by mental analysis; to deal with conclusively; to clear away or dispel; answer.

Certainly. If you can’t disintegrate an obstacle, then resolve it into something else in order to resolve the problem. Here’s the problem with most people – not just artists: They spend 90 percent of their time doing what it takes in order to provide the means necessary to do what they want to do with the other 10 percent of their time. That may be true for you, but it doesn’t change the fact that you need to spend 100 percent of your energy toward your goals during that 10 percent of time available to you to pursue your craft.

Listen to plays or books about the craft on tape, or podcasts about your art while you drive around waiting for that next customer who needs a ride. Read a play or a screen play on your breaks or lunch hours. Turn off the LuLoo at night in favor of practicing a new audition monologue, or perfecting the one you have that hasn’t been winning you any roles lately. Don’t spend time caught in the Flix Net, binge watching the latest series. Watch documentaries about your craft, and the best people who have succeeded in the craft. Learn from them. Here’s something they all have in common: they did the work to get the work.

Get resolved.

In chemistry, resolve means to separate into “optically active components.” Nothing could be more clear. You have to be able to actively “see” the components to each and every goal. You cannot reach any point without knowing how to get there, and crossing the countless points in between. That requires seeing the points in between with a clear plan about how to traverse them. When we resolve an image, we “separate and make visible the individual parts.” These principles of optics are important to pursuing your craft – one facet of the spectrum at a time, if need be.

In music we “resolve” a chord, or a harmony section from dissonance to consonance. If you are not resolved to pursue your craft every single day, you have cognitive dissonance about your chances of making a living through your art. Resolve to create some consonance between your dreams and your actions. Get busy.

Work doesn’t always have to be work. We are creative people. We can create ways to enjoy doing the work. Instead of inviting that fellow actor friend out for drinks, invite them over for a bottle of wine to share monologues. Perform for each other. Give each other notes. Help each other grow as performers. If you are writers, then share some pages with each other of what you are currently working on. Give each other feedback. Advance the draft just one step further…..Every day!

Cartoon of the Algonquin Round Table by Al Hirschfeld. Clockwise, from the bottom left: Robert E. Sherwood, Dorothy Parker, Robert Benchley, Alexander Woollcott, Heywood Broun, Marc Connelly, Franklin Pierce Adams, Edna Ferber and George S. Kaufman. In the background, left to right, Lynn Fontanne, Alfred Lunt, Frank Crowninshield, and Frank Case, manager of the Algonquin Hotel.

It’s 2019 – the 100th anniversary of the founding of the Algonquin Round Table. The new Roaring Twenties are upon us! When you plan that next dinner party, become your own John Peter Toohey, and create your own Round Table of artists. Do acting exercises with each other, play theater games to keep your skills sharp, and read plays or screen plays out loud together. Plan your next production, Perform scenes and monologues together, and for each other, to learn from each other and improve your craft. Write. Share ideas. Work on accents together.

Resolve yourself to host a theme party for your industry friends. Choose a genre of theatre or film to inspire your theme. Choose a playwright, and ask everyone to come to the party prepared to do a scene or monologue from one of the plays. Choose an accent for the evening, or make it a game throughout the night that every hour on the hour someone draws a new accent out of a hat, and everyone has to do their best to maintain it for the next hour.

We can create ways to have fun doing the work, but we must be resolved to be diligent in our continued pursuit of our craft, and we must stay resolved; whether it is Jan. 1, or Feb. 1, or March 10, or July 29, or tomorrow. And tomorrow, and tomorrow…


Steven Sabel's Twist on the Trade: Just Getting Warmed Up

 

Just Getting Warmed Up

Welcome to a new monthly column which I hope will add some perspective to our trade – sometimes new, and sometimes perhaps tired out from over stating, but yet somehow still needing to be stated again and again. I have been a student of this craft for most of my entire life. Cast in my first summer stock stage production at the age of 9, I developed the “bug” (as we often call it), and never found the cure. I produced and directed my first production in 1993, and there have been 126 more since then, at an average of five productions per year for the last 25 consecutive years. I’ve seen a lot. I haven’t seen it all – yet – but I’ve seen a lot.
Throughout the past 25 years I have viewed more than 40,000 head shots and resumes; I have witnessed more than 10,000 audition monologues; and I have worked with nearly 2,000 different actors. The range of talent I have seen runs the entire gamut, from children as young as 5, to aging actors in their late 70s; from the greenest of the green, to the most seasoned veterans, and everything in between. Many of the lessons to be learned from working with such a variety of artists are the same year after year, show after show, and the artists who have worked with me repeatedly know that I have certain mantras, maxims, aphorisms, and axioms that some actors have heard so often they call them “Sabelisms.” They are indeed, my twists on the trade.
This new monthly column will attempt to deliver those Sabelisms in such a way as to explain their meaning, relevance, and origins. They have developed over time, and no matter how old I get, or how many shows I produce, they remain an essential aspect of doing the work to get the work. There’s one: You have to do the work to get the work.
Most actors are lazy. Don’t be offended. Most people are lazy. We are designed to seek the path of least resistance. It is part of the learning process of the human species. Yet the most successful artists I have worked with know that there is nothing easy about succeeding in this trade. It is work. It is hard work. Those who are willing to do the hard work, will continue to find work to do. Those who demonstrate an ability to do the work, will develop a reputation for doing the work, and find themselves sought after when there is work to be found. We hear it all of the time: “She’s always working,” or “He is the first to arrive, and the last to leave,” or “That artist is so great to work with.” When was the last time anyone said any of those things about you as an artist?
A vast number of the actors I have worked with have to come the trade with a degree in hand from an expensive school with a major theatre or film department behind them. I always marvel at how an actor struggling under the weight of student loans and stifling debt incurred through their artistic education, can so quickly throw out so much of the education they paid so highly for. Nearly every theatre program I have ever heard of, known of, or have been associated with teaches certain precepts in year one of their program. They teach these aspects in year one, because they are the foundational beginnings of doing the work.
One essential aspect of that training is the importance of a good warm-up routine. Acting is a physical craft. Acting is 90 percent what you DO, and 10 percent what you say (there’s another Sabelism). Text Nazis, stringent stage managers, and dramaturgs everywhere often get upset at me for reiterating this aphorism, but it is true nonetheless. Pitch, tone, inflection, and rate of speech are all physical choices made by an actor, just as much as are posture, stance, gait, and gesture. We have all heard – perhaps ad nausea – how important our bodies and voices are as the tools of our trade. Yet every show I produce, I find myself having to remind actors to do their warm ups. It is ridiculous. It is ridiculous for anyone to think that they can ignore the importance of their tools – in some cases, outright neglect their tools – and hope to do their best work. This is true in ANY trade. Imagine a surgeon without a sharpened scalpel. Ridiculous of course, except I have seen so many actors bring a butter knife into the operating room of their trade.
Warm ups are not just a good idea, they are essential to the craft. Finding and creating that neutral physical place to build the character from is just the beginning. Warming up and strengthening the body for doing the work of maintaining the physical character – especially in a two-hour live performance – is the difference between presenting a believable performance, or “phoning it in.” You cannot possibly hope to accurately speak your lines with proper clarity, diction, and projection without first warming up your voice, your face, your tongue (one of the strongest muscles in the body), your jaw, your diaphragm, etc. You wouldn’t go out and pitch a World Series game without first warming up your arm…
“But Sabel, not every role I play is equitable to a World Series game.” That’s part of your problem. How you view the work, is how you will be viewed in the work, and how you will be viewed by your fellow artists. Treat every role like that starring role in a feature film, or don’t accept the role. If you are not willing to do the work, then don’t accept the work.
“But Sabel, this isn’t even a paying gig.” You cannot expect to receive offers for paying gigs, if you can’t demonstrate your ability to properly perform every gig you accept. You have to do the work to get the work.
Warm ups are not just for your body, but also for your mind. They should be a part of your routine that also helps you focus on creating and truly performing the character. Many actors incorporate their lines into their warm up routines. Some actors incorporate exercises that are specific to the physicality of the role they are playing. The great actor, Fredric March, used to walk completely around the outside of the theatre doing his vocal warm ups while he assumed the gait and posture of the character before making his first entrance. He was also known for his intense focus backstage. No chit-chat, no socializing – just an actor focused on doing the work. You cannot hope to walk onto the stage in full character, completely focused on the scene at hand, when three minutes ago you were chatting with a fellow actor about the Dodgers, or skimming social media for the latest click bait.
You have to do the work to get the work, and the work begins with a proper warm up, proper focus, and maintaining that focus throughout the job. The actor who is properly stretching, developing muscle isolation, focusing on breathe control, generating a physical character different from self, dwelling within the mind of the character while warming up the apparatus of performance, is the actor who is going to do the best work. Period. That goes for auditions as well as performances. Nobody wants to hire a lazy actor. Nobody wants to hire a lazy employee in ANY trade. Don’t be lazy. Do the work. Now go look in the mirror, and ask yourself whether or not you are willing to do the work. If not: Get out of the way for the rest of us who are doing the work.
Got your nose out of joint? Check back for next month’s column on head shots, because I’m just getting warmed up….


OVATION TV PARTNERS WITH THE ACTORS STUDIO FOR NEW EPISODES OF INSIDE THE ACTORS STUDIO TO PREMIERE IN FALL 2019

LOS ANGELES: Ovation TV, America’s only arts network, has completed an agreement with the Actors Studio to produce and air future episodes of Inside The Actors Studio, the award-winning interview series about the art of acting. As part of the agreement, the network will also curate content from the series’ extensive library for additional episodes.
Ovation will premiere the new Inside The Actors Studio in the Fall of 2019. James Lipton, the series’ creator, original host and executive producer, will turn the microphone over to a number of rotating guest hosts, who are in consideration now by the network and The Actors Studio.
“It’s very gratifying to see the legacy of Inside The Actors Studio being carried forward for a new generation to appreciate and enjoy,” said James Lipton. “I made a vow early on that we would not deal in gossip — only in craft, and Ovation, as a network dedicated to the arts, will continue that tradition with the next seasons of the series. I’m excited to see the new hosts engage with the guests and students and continue to entertain viewers in the U.S. and around the world.”
Inside The Actors Studio is a series that fits perfectly with Ovation’s mission to provide viewers with diverse arts programming, and we’re doing it from the heart of New York City with the support of our partners at AT&T/DIRECTV, Comcast, Charter, Verizon FiOS and independent cable operators across the country,” said Charles Segars, CEO, Ovation.
Inside The Actors Studio began and will continue to be a televised craft seminar for the students of The Actors Studio MFA program at Pace University. Paul Newman, a former Actors Studio president, was the show’s first televised guest. The series has gone on to host a veritable “Who’s Who” of award-winning actors and directors over the past two decades, over 200 in all, including Sally Field, Ellen Burstyn, Alec Baldwin, Bradley Cooper, Brad Pitt, Sidney Pollack, Carol Burnett, Jessica Lange, Julia Roberts, Willem Dafoe, Billy Crystal, Shirley MacLaine, Meryl Streep, Spike Lee, Martin Scorsese, Jeremy Irons, Barbra Streisand, Clint Eastwood, Al Pacino, George Clooney, Angelina Jolie, and scores of others. The series has received 20 Emmy nominations in the Outstanding Informational Series or Special category. The series received an Emmy in this category in 2013. James Lipton also won the Critics Choice award for Best Host in 2015.
“Ovation is dedicated to supporting The Actors Studio’s commitment to providing the best educational resources for its students. In so doing, we will uphold the high standard set by James Lipton for excellence in producing programming that is multicultural, informational, enlightening and entertaining,” said Scott Woodward, EVP of Programming and Production, Ovation TV. “We look forward to introducing a whole new generation to the craft of acting through vibrant new hosts and guests that we will begin to announce in the coming months.”
“Over the years this series has had a profound impact on the Studio’s MFA program at Pace University,” said Ellen Burstyn. “I know my co-presidents, Alec Baldwin and Al Pacino, and our Board of Directors, share my enthusiasm that Ovation has come on board to continue this enduring legacy.”
The series is filmed at the Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts at Pace University’s New York City campus. Ovation will continue filming at this venue.
In addition to having exclusive linear and digital rights in the U.S. to new episodes of Inside The Actors Studio, Ovation will also control all international rights to such episodes.
Gray Coleman of Davis Wright Tremaine and Michael Kagan of ICM Partners represented The Actors Studio, and Rob Rader, General Counsel, negotiated on behalf of Ovation.


Antaeus Academy Classes Open for Enrollment

Antaeus Academy is offering now 12 classes and this is the time to enroll for these summer sessions!
If you’re interested in any of the classes below, visit http://antaeus.org/arts-education/academy/academy-3/ and click on the “Enroll Now” button to use the enrollment form on the website.
If you take more than one class, you can get a “buy one, get one 50% off” discount.
Friends and Colleagues: Harold Pinter & Simon Gray
Moderated by Nike Doukas
Mondays 12-4pm, June 25-August 27 (10 weeks)
$450 (Early Bird Discount $400, due by June 11)
Class Size: 14-16
Harold Pinter and Simon Gray wrote very different kinds of plays: Pinter is terse and mysterious; Gray is verbose and more naturalistic – but they are both darkly comic and subversive. They were great friends and Pinter directed Gray’s perhaps most popular play, Butley. In this class, the class will focus on the plays of Pinter (Betrayal, Lovers, The Birthday Party, The Homecoming, etc) but also take a look at some by Gray: Butley, Otherwise Engaged, Quartermaine’s Terms, and others. Both men are dazzling masters of language who demonstrate those skills with vastly different approaches. Prepare to be thrilled by the experience of interpreting their work.
Myth, Superstition & the Blues: The Poetry of August Wilson
Moderated by Gregg Daniel

Mondays 7-11pm, June 11-July 16 (6 weeks)
$310 (Early Bird Discount $280, due by May 28)
Class Size: 14-16
Two-time Pulitzer Prize winner August Wilson is arguably one of the great playwrights of the 20th century. His ambitious ten-part play series known as “The Century Cycle” chronicles the African American experience during each decade of the 20th century. His work has garnered a Tony Award as well as the New York Drama Critics Circle Award.
In this workshop, the class will examine the themes, sources and personal history that make the playwright’s work so resonant. Through scene and monologue work, you will delve into the musicality, rhythm, prose and poetry which distinguishes Wilson’s text. As Wilson stated, “the more my characters talk, the more I find out about them.”
This class is open to students of all ethnicities, races and backgrounds.
An Amuse-Bouche of Masters: A Scene Study/Technique Class
Moderated by Daniel Blinkoff

Tuesdays 2-6pm, June 12-August 14 (10 weeks)
$450 (Early Bird Discount $400, due by May 29)
Class Size: 14-16
This 10-week Intensive will focus on Chekhov, Stanislavski, and Earle Gister’s technique of acting developed at The Yale School of Drama. Whether you have a lot of experience with any of these innovators of the theatre, or none at all, it doesn’t matter. Your curiosity and passion is all that is required. Just like the Master’s Program at Yale, this class will start exactly where you are and work from there. With a main focus on Chekhov’s plays and short stories, the class will focus on The Moscow Art Theatre’s approach to Chekhov, examining Stanislavski’s scene analysis while combining it with the exercises that The Moscow Art Theatre utilizes in interpreting Chekhov’s plays so the actor is no longer thinking about the play but experiencing it in a kinesthetic physical manner. Once this is established, Earle Gister’s technique of acting will be introduced as an aid in releasing the work. Through this scene study, focusing on Chekhov and then possibly bridging out towards more modern texts, the class will experience the common threads between all of these master teachers and how they resonate in all different kinds of texts. This class is an opportunity to strip away our own misconceptions with these three masters of the theatre and to experience their approaches in a positive and beneficial way that we can use today.
Mind the (Gender) Gap
Moderated by John Sloan

Tuesdays 7-11, June 5-August 21 (12 weeks)
$550 (Early Bird Discount $500, due by May 24)
Class Size: 16-18
Every word a woman writes changes the story of the world, revises the official version.–Carolyn See
In the 21st century, female playwrights are taking center stage (and creating some of our favorite television shows too). But for so many years, the work of female playwrights hasn’t been given the attention it deserves. In this class the company will focus their scene study work on plays written by women from all over the world, from the earliest days of the theater to the rich and varied works of contemporary times. Through the exploration of what dramaturg Susan Jonas called “the other canon,” the class will challenge our assumptions, expand our horizons, enrich our craft, and add depth to our experience as actors and as people.
The Dive In: Othello
Moderated by Elizabeth Swain

Tuesdays 1-5, July 3-31 (5 weeks)
Tuition: $280 (Early Bird Rate $250, due no later than June 19)
Class Size: 14-16
How well do you really know this play? Through deep textual analysis, set against knowledge of Shakespeare’s times, the class will dig and dive and gain more understanding of Shakespeare’s meanings. In the long held Antaean tradition the actors will read the play together, playing any parts they choose. Occasionally the class participants might stage a scene to clarify (he did intend the plays for performance!) but the intention is to gain a new understanding of Shakespeare’s text through extended table work, readying them all for a production. The final class will include a reading of the play, all participants alternating roles.
A Holistic Look at Dialects: UK Edition
Moderated by Lauren Lovett-Cohen

Wednesdays 1-4, July 11-August 29 (8 weeks)
Tuition: $310 (Early Bird Rate $280, due no later than June 27)
Class Size: 14-16
It’s 2018, and thankfully there are more and more TV/Film/Web and theater projects that include roles from all over the world. The idea of a Standard American dialect or RP or the “correct” way to speak is giving way to the specificity of the who/what/where and the history of each character.
Join Antaeus for this class where they open up a new way of looking at dialects — with a concentration on the UK for this round — to give you the tools for getting more work in today’s projects. There will be monologues and scene work from various plays penned by British authors from the turn of the 20th century through today.
Shakespeare: Making the Bard’s Words Your Words
Moderated by Rob Nagle

Wednesdays 7-11, June 6-August 29* (12 weeks)
$550 (Early Bird Discount $500, due by May 25)
Class Size: 16-18
*no class the week of July 4
Why is Shakespeare such a challenge to so many, not only to perform, but also to comprehend? Could it be that we get caught up in the academic, an analytic study of the text through reading it, and then find ourselves neglecting the characters, the people we are attempting to bring to life. In this class, through action and scene study, participants will find a way to use the scansion and the poetry to make them bolder actors — and in so doing, participants will find his words coming out of their mouths as conversational and current, but not casual or contemporary.
Fitzmaurice Voicework
Moderated by Scott Ferrara

Thursdays 1-5pm, July 19-September 6 (8 weeks)
$350 (Early Bird Discount $300, due by June 7)
Class Size: 14-16
Whether you work in theatre, film or television, all mediums of our craft call for vocal strength, flexibility, and specificity. This class uses a holistic approach to body/mind/ voice work, to help the participant explore the dynamics between body, breath, voice, imagination, language, and presence.This approach liberates the mind, body and voice by strengthening the connection between what the participants are feeling and what they’re expressing. By integrating physical exercises with mental focus, the class will bring the full richness of the actors’ experiences to their work. By strengthening the “support” for the participants voice, the class will also add more variety to the expression of the performers use of it, be that in pitch, volume, singing – all without straining the voice or vocal chords. And then the class will combine Classical Text with the voice work, further developing the awareness, trust and freedom with the actors’ breathing, body, feelings, imagination, and voice and add more vibrancy and presence in performance.
Shaw, Wilde & Coward
Moderated by Kitty Swink

Thursdays 7-11, June 7-August 30* (12 weeks)
$550 (Early Bird Discount $500, due by May 19)
Class Size: 14-16
*no class on July 12
“This suspense is terrible. I hope it will last.” Oscar Wilde
This class will engage participants in the wit, craft and social commentary of three of the English language’s most celebrated playwrights, Oscar Wilde, George Bernard Shaw and Noel Coward. Participants will learn to contextualize their times, manners and behaviors, and using scene work they will embrace truthfulness, imagination, concentration and living in the actor’s body while performing biting satire and high comedy. The powerful combination of technical expertise and emotional truth brings each of the playwrights to life and makes the participants understand why these three have been performed for more than a century. Open to actors of all ages.
Shakespeare 2.0
Moderated by Armin Shimerman

Saturdays 10am-2pm, June 9-July 28 (8 weeks)
$400 (Early Bird Discount $350, due by May 24)
Class Size: 14-16
This class is a further exploration of Shakespearean acting skills for people who have already studied with Armin at Antaeus. This class will further intensify the actor’s awareness of the text and how to clearly communicate that to an audience. To enroll, participants must apply and be approved.
Real, Safe, and Kicka**: Stage Violence for Actors
Moderated by Ned Mochel

Saturdays 10am-2pm, July 7-August 25 (8 weeks)
Tuition: $350 (Early Bird Rate $300, due no later than June 22)
Class Size: 14-16
This class focuses on an exciting, new approach toward stage violence in the American theater that’s rougher, tougher, and more realistic. This is not your traditional stage combat class; this class prepares the modern actor to engage in a more realistic, intense style of stage action.
Ned Mochel has been building stage violence for over 25 years. His violence design has been showcased in plays at Steppenwolf Theatre Company in Chicago, on and off Broadway in NYC, Geffen Playhouse, as well as at Antaeus Theatre Company. He’s been changing the way audiences perceive stage violence one production at a time. If you’ve been immersed in stage action in the past or if you’re interested in diving in for the first time, this is the class for you. It’s a rough, tough, fun approach–an experience you’ll never forget. Learn how to make it real, stay safe, and kick ass. From hand to hand fighting and gun work to detailed sword training, you’ll find yourself building new skills to set you apart from the others. This is new cutting edge stage action and it’s happening at Antaeus.
Shakespeare: Getting Started – WAIT LIST ONLY
Moderated by Armin Shimerman

Wednesdays 1-5pm, June 13-August 8* (8 weeks)
$400 (Early Bird Discount $350, due by May 30)
Class Size: 14-16
*no class the week of July 4
This class is designed for those who have never studied Shakespeare with Armin before. It will include monologue/scene study and a thorough approach to acting, understanding, and communicating through language, history, religion, social mores, and – the Rosetta stone to performing Shakespeare – Elizabethan rhetoric. Any fear of performing/reading Shakespeare will be cured. You may laugh as well.


Fire, Glass-Walk With Me: A Revealing Interview With Vixen DeVille

Fire-eating, glass-walking, circus aerial, magic, burlesque, costume crafting, comedy, and acting—British actress Cat LaCohie fits all of these skills into her life and her new solo show “Vixen DeVille Revealed”, coming to the Hollywood Fringe Festival this June.

Originally from Newcastle, LaCohie began her career in London, with appearances at Cafe De Paris, The Ritz Hotel and at the Charing Cross Theatre in West End, since relocating to Los Angeles.

Having performed regularly at The Viper Room, LA Convention Center, The Roosevelt Hotel, Harvelle’s Santa Monica and Long Beach, and at The Orleans Casino and Hotel in Las Vegas, and with multiple television appearances like “Masters Of Illusion,” she also teaches her craft both privately and in group workshops with classes that range from “Introduction to Burlesque & Body Confidence”—where she teaches you to “embrace the freedom to express yourself…the good, the bad and the wobbly!”—to full “Solo Act Development”, along with “Costume Crafting” and specialty performance skills that include fire performance, aerial and more.



Also currently performing with the Doll Face Dames, where there are over 30 people in the troupe who perform in rotation throughout LA, LaCohie often serves as a form of host—or Mistress of Ceremonies—a position she found through her unique use of comedy, burlesque, and having the additional benefit of a British accent in Los Angeles.

In that, she works up the audience in preparation for the show to come, laying out the rules and restrictions with charm.

“We want you to be loud and rowdy, in certain ways!,” said LaCohie. “So as the host we’ll get people up and shouting. We’ll tell you what the rules are—don’t touch the girls, don’t do this, do this, don’t do that—It’s kind of like a stand-up comedienne.”

Starting her career in burlesque in 2006, she performed for nearly eight years in the U.K. When coming to Los Angeles, she only brought three burlesque outfits, just in case she needed them, because her idea and goal was to focus on acting.

“I figured, if I need to, I can make some money doing burlesque,” she said. But ultimately, she simply missed it as a performance artist and decided to continue her style of burlesque performing in Los Angeles, which then lead to teaching.

Photos by Monique A. LeBleu
Cat LaCohie, Vixen DeVille, teaches burlesque technique, style, confidence, personalization at Madilyn Clark Studios, in Burbank, Calfornia, April 9, 2018.

She began teaching basic burlesque routine moves for a company, which she found pedestrian at the time. But in conversations, people expressed fascination and a desire to perform themselves, but had reservations varying from body confidence issues to disbelief that they could ever learn the skills or master the courage.

“I met people who said ‘Oh, I could never perform burlesque!’ or “I could never do … but, want to do it!,'” said LaCohie. “If you have anything in you that wants to do this, then why are you talking yourself out of it?”

In teaching, she then began focusing not on the dance moves, or the technique of it. “Looking at your confidence, looking at your character, what pleases you, and what you’re going to have fun doing in front of an audience … do you want to show your dark side, or your fun side, or your sexy side,” said LaCohie.

Aside from burlesque, LaCohie is trained in fire performance—including fire eating, fire fans and fire spinning, and body burning—aerial performance, and glass walking, the latter of which she incorporates a dance where she rolls in glass and experiments with ballet. But her experimentation has not been without dangers.

From minor injuries to her knee and legs while performing in an acting class in the UK, to more serious injuries while focused and teaching after coming to Los Angeles.

Early on, while training in the Meisner Acting Technique, she thought to incorporate the new skill of glass walking into a scene with another student. After smashing a bottle in the scene, while focused on the scene, she knelt into it – a risky transaction for the yet fully trained glass walker.

Cat LaCohie, Vixen DeVille, at Madilyn Clark Studios, in Burbank, Calfornia, April 9, 2018.

“[during the scene] I thought, ‘Why is it cold?’ And there’s blood dripping all over me. And my teacher goes. ‘Whatever hinders you is your task, continue with the scene!,'” said LaCohie, so she did. “So then the guy with me in the scene is helping me mop up the blood. So I thought, ‘Well I guess I can’t kneel down in it!'”

Another incident, in a distracted moment while teaching, LaCohie leaned back into preset broken glass, cutting deep enough into her hand to tear tendons. Once again, she quickly made temporary self-ministrations to her wounds so that she could continue while teaching in the moment, leaving a lengthy and costly recovery for a future time.

Encouraged after speaking with friends who’ve participated in the annual Hollywood Fringe Festival, LaCohie has now decided to pull her skills into a solo show. For the annual festival that brings Hollywood smaller theaters to the forefront of attention each summer, she will premiere “Vixen DeVille Revealed.”

Incorporating burlesque, circus, magic, comedy, LaCohie promises to reveal “the truth behind her multi-talented Burlesque persona, VixenDeVille’”, and invite you to “discover your own inner Vixen.”

With a limited VIP Experience, she will even teach you to eat fire or walk on broken glass, live on stage as part of the show.

In the meantime, LaCohie will be teaching a two-hour workshop at The Lounge Theatre on Saturday, May 19, 2018, at 11 a.m. with an introduction to the Basics of Burlesque Performance.

With plans to return to Newcastle and London sometime soon after the Hollywood Fringe Festival, LaCohie plans to bring Vixen DeVille Revealed home.

Vixen DeVille Revealedopens June 1, 2018, at the Lounge Theatre, 6201 Santa Monica Blvd, CA 90038.

Go here for more show information and tickets.

For more on Cat LaCohie, listen to the podcast: